Biodegradable Polymers for Drug Releasing

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 October 2023) | Viewed by 8674

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Center for Advanced Biomaterials for Health Care, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT@CRIB), 80125 Naples, Italy
2. Department of Chemical, Materials and Industrial Production Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples, Italy
Interests: drug delivery; microneedles; biodegradable; microparticle; nanoparticle

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Guest Editor
National Research Council - Piazzale Aldo Moro, 7 - 00185 Rome, Italy
Interests: drug delivery; antimicrobial materials; biomedical applications; chitosan

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Co-Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical nanotechnology School of pharmacy, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran
Interests: nano/bio catalysis; nano/bio materials; novel drug delivery systems; asymmetric catalysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polymeric-based carriers have attracted great attention in drug delivery settings. They offer a number of clear advantages, such as increasing bioavailability, reducing adverse effects, and enhancing absorption into targeted organs. We can discuss the impact of encapsulation of various therapeutic agents into biodegradable systems such as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) poly(lactic acid), chitosan, gelatin, and polycaprolactone. Biodegradable drug carriers are responsible for delivering drugs and then typically degrading through hydrolysis or common proteases for physiological clearance. This Special Issue is devoted to the most recent research on these topics, covering all aspects concerning the different biodegradable polymeric materials and their nanocomposites for drug delivery applications. Both original research papers and comprehensive reviews are welcome.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: natural polymers such as polysaccharides; biodegradable synthetic polymers; micro- and nanoplatforms, e.g., microneedles and nanocomposites; and biomedical applications in cancer treatment, infection therapy, regenerative medicines, and drug delivery.

Dr. Rezvan Jamaledin
Dr. Esmaeel Sharifi
Dr. Aziz Maleki
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • drug delivery
  • microneedles
  • biodegradable
  • microparticle
  • nanoparticle

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 4068 KiB  
Article
Ketorolac Loaded Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Coating of AZ31 in the Treatment of Bone Fracture Pain
by Matteo Puccetti, Eleonora Cusati, Cinzia Antognelli, Maurizio Ricci, Valeria Ambrogi and Aurélie Schoubben
Polymers 2023, 15(10), 2246; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15102246 - 9 May 2023
Viewed by 1546
Abstract
Biodegradable metal alloys may be successfully used to support bone repair, avoiding second surgery commonly needed when inert metal alloys are used. Combining a biodegradable metal alloy with a suitable pain relief agent could improve patient quality of life. AZ31 alloy was coated [...] Read more.
Biodegradable metal alloys may be successfully used to support bone repair, avoiding second surgery commonly needed when inert metal alloys are used. Combining a biodegradable metal alloy with a suitable pain relief agent could improve patient quality of life. AZ31 alloy was coated using a poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) polymer loaded with ketorolac tromethamine using the solvent casting method. The ketorolac release profile from the polymeric film and the coated AZ31 samples, the PLGA mass loss of polymeric film, and the cytotoxicity of the optimized coated alloy were assessed. The coated sample showed a ketorolac release that was prolonged for two weeks, which was slower than that of just the polymeric film, in simulated body fluid. PLGA mass loss was complete after a 45-day immersion in simulated body fluid. The PLGA coating was able to lower AZ31 and ketorolac tromethamine cytotoxicity observed in human osteoblasts. PLGA coating also prevents AZ31 cytotoxicity, which was identified in human fibroblasts. Therefore, PLGA was able to control ketorolac release and protect AZ31 from premature corrosion. These characteristics allow us to hypothesize that the use of ketorolac tromethamine-loaded PLGA coating on AZ31 in the management of bone fractures can favor osteosynthesis and relief pain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodegradable Polymers for Drug Releasing)
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11 pages, 2062 KiB  
Article
Shape-Tunable UV-Printed Solid Drugs for Personalized Medicine
by Bobby Aditya Darmawan, Sang Bong Lee, Minghui Nan, Van Du Nguyen, Jong-Oh Park and Eunpyo Choi
Polymers 2022, 14(13), 2714; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14132714 - 2 Jul 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1549
Abstract
Several recent advances have emerged in biotherapy and the development of personal drugs. However, studies exploring effective manufacturing methods of personal drugs remain limited. In this study, solid drugs based on poly(ethylene glycol)diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel and doxorubicin were fabricated, and their final geometry [...] Read more.
Several recent advances have emerged in biotherapy and the development of personal drugs. However, studies exploring effective manufacturing methods of personal drugs remain limited. In this study, solid drugs based on poly(ethylene glycol)diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel and doxorubicin were fabricated, and their final geometry was varied through UV-light patterning. The results suggested that the final drug concentration was affected by the geometrical volume as well as the UV-light exposure time. The analysis of PEGDA showed no effect on the surrounding cells, indicating its high biocompatibility. However, with the addition of doxorubicin, it showed an excellent therapeutic effect, indicating that drugs inside the PEGDA structure could be successfully released. This approach enables personal drugs to be fabricated in a simple, fast, and uniform manner, with perfectly tuned geometry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodegradable Polymers for Drug Releasing)
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Review

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24 pages, 3623 KiB  
Review
Drug Delivery of Gelatin Nanoparticles as a Biodegradable Polymer for the Treatment of Infectious Diseases: Perspectives and Challenges
by Osama A. Madkhali
Polymers 2023, 15(21), 4327; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15214327 - 5 Nov 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2130
Abstract
In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the use of gelatin nanoparticles (GNPs) for the treatment of infectious diseases. The inherent properties of these nanoparticles make them attractive options for drug delivery. Their biocompatibility ensures that they can interact with [...] Read more.
In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the use of gelatin nanoparticles (GNPs) for the treatment of infectious diseases. The inherent properties of these nanoparticles make them attractive options for drug delivery. Their biocompatibility ensures that they can interact with biological systems without causing adverse reactions, while their biodegradability ensures that they can break down harmlessly in the body once their function is performed. Furthermore, their capacity for controlled drug release ensures that therapeutic agents can be delivered over a sustained period, thereby enhancing treatment efficacy. This review examines the current landscape of GNP-based drug delivery, with a specific focus on its potential applications and challenges in the context of infectious diseases. Key challenges include controlling drug release rates, ensuring nanoparticle stability under physiological conditions, scaling up production while maintaining quality, mitigating potential immunogenic reactions, optimizing drug loading efficiency, and tracking the biodistribution and clearance of GNPs in the body. Despite these hurdles, GNPs hold promising potential in the realm of infectious disease treatment. Ongoing research and innovation are essential to overcome these obstacles and completely harness the potential of GNPs in clinical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodegradable Polymers for Drug Releasing)
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29 pages, 2365 KiB  
Review
Biodegradable Polymer Electrospinning for Tendon Repairment
by Yiming Zhang, Yueguang Xue, Yan Ren, Xin Li and Ying Liu
Polymers 2023, 15(6), 1566; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15061566 - 21 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2442
Abstract
With the degradation after aging and the destruction of high-intensity exercise, the frequency of tendon injury is also increasing, which will lead to serious pain and disability. Due to the structural specificity of the tendon tissue, the traditional treatment of tendon injury repair [...] Read more.
With the degradation after aging and the destruction of high-intensity exercise, the frequency of tendon injury is also increasing, which will lead to serious pain and disability. Due to the structural specificity of the tendon tissue, the traditional treatment of tendon injury repair has certain limitations. Biodegradable polymer electrospinning technology with good biocompatibility and degradability can effectively repair tendons, and its mechanical properties can be achieved by adjusting the fiber diameter and fiber spacing. Here, this review first briefly introduces the structure and function of the tendon and the repair process after injury. Then, different kinds of biodegradable natural polymers for tendon repair are summarized. Then, the advantages and disadvantages of three-dimensional (3D) electrospun products in tendon repair and regeneration are summarized, as well as the optimization of electrospun fiber scaffolds with different bioactive materials and the latest application in tendon regeneration engineering. Bioactive molecules can optimize the structure of these products and improve their repair performance. Importantly, we discuss the application of the 3D electrospinning scaffold’s superior structure in different stages of tendon repair. Meanwhile, the combination of other advanced technologies has greater potential in tendon repair. Finally, the relevant patents of biodegradable electrospun scaffolds for repairing damaged tendons, as well as their clinical applications, problems in current development, and future directions are summarized. In general, the use of biodegradable electrospun fibers for tendon repair is a promising and exciting research field, but further research is needed to fully understand its potential and optimize its application in tissue engineering. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodegradable Polymers for Drug Releasing)
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