Advances in Polymer Optical Fibers

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Fibers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2022) | Viewed by 4413

Special Issue Editors

Center for Cognition and Neuroergonomics, State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Zhuhai 519087, China
Interests: microstructured optical fiber; polymer optical fiber; optical fiber sensing; speckle analysis; microwave photonics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Research Center for Advanced Optics and Photoelectronics, Department of Physics, College of Science, Shantou University, Shantou 515063, China
Interests: fiber Bragg gratings; tilted fiber Bragg gratings; polymer optical fiber sensors; surface plasmon resonance; biosensors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Photonics Research Centre, Department of Electrical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong 999077, China
Interests: polymer optical fiber; biomedical application; microwave photonics; optical fiber sensing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polymer optical fibers (POF) have been proven in recent years to be very attractive fibers due to their large sensitivity to external environments, biocompatibility, and easy handling, among their other advantages. Short distance telecommunications and sensing have been identified as fields with an increasing number of potential applications. The purpose of this Special Issue is to collect advances in fundamental research, development of technologies, as well as innovative applications of polymer optical fibers for sensing and communications.  

It is our pleasure to invite you to submit original research papers, short communications, or state-of-the-art reviews within the scope of this Special Issue. Contributions can range from fundamental properties of polymer fibers, their fabrication and characterization, as well as innovations in processing technologies for the development of applications.

Topics include but are not limited to theoretical and experimental original work on the following:

  • New polymer fibers: materials and special structures, etc.;
  • Polymer optical fiber transmission simulation, etc.;
  • Polymer optical fiber networks: indoor, in-vehicles, etc.;
  • Multiformat signal transmission over polymer fibers;
  • POF transceivers;
  • Multiplexing/demultiplexing techniques in POF networks;
  • Physical, chemical, mechanical, electromagnetic, biological, and medical sensors;
  • Sensors based on colorimetry, evanescent wave, and infrared spectroscopies;
  • Plasmonic-based sensors;
  • Interferometers and polarimetric configurations (as FP cavities, MMI, Michelson, Mach-Zehnder, and Sagnac, among others);
  • Micro and nano fabrication, smart structures, and sensors including gratings (FBG, LPFG), tapers, and etched configurations;
  • Functionalization methods and thin films coatings (including metals, oxides, and graphene);
  • Sensor networking and distributed sensing;
  • New concepts for photonic sensing;
  • Applications including, but not limited to aquaculture, mechanical, civil, pharmaceutical, oil and gas industries, human and animal health monitoring, environment monitoring, harsh environments, food processing and monitoring, medical instrumentation.

Dr. Rui Min
Dr. Xuehao Hu
Dr. Xin Cheng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polymer optical fiber
  • sensing application
  • communication application
  • plasmonic
  • multifunctional POF
  • biomedical application

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 5006 KiB  
Article
Direct Bragg Grating Inscription in Single Mode Step-Index TOPAS/ZEONEX Polymer Optical Fiber Using 520 nm Femtosecond Pulses
by Xuehao Hu, Yuhang Chen, Shixin Gao, Rui Min, Getinet Woyessa, Ole Bang, Hang Qu, Heng Wang and Christophe Caucheteur
Polymers 2022, 14(7), 1350; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14071350 - 26 Mar 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2225 | Correction
Abstract
We experimentally report fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in a single mode step-index polymer optical fiber (POF) with a core made of TOPAS and cladding made of ZEONEX using 520 nm femtosecond pulses and a point-by-point (PbP) inscription method. With different pulse energies between [...] Read more.
We experimentally report fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in a single mode step-index polymer optical fiber (POF) with a core made of TOPAS and cladding made of ZEONEX using 520 nm femtosecond pulses and a point-by-point (PbP) inscription method. With different pulse energies between 9.7 nJ and 11.2 nJ, 12 FBGs are distributed along the cores of two pieces of POFs with negative averaged effective index change up to ~6 × 10−4 in the TOPAS. For POF 1 with FBGs 1–6, the highest reflectivity 45.1% is obtained with a pulse energy of 10.6 nJ. After inscription, good grating stability is reported. Thanks to the post-annealing at 125 °C for 24 h, after cooling the grating reflectivity increases by ~10%. For POF 2 with FBGs 7–12, similar FBG data are obtained showing good reproducibility. Then, the FBGs are annealed at 125 °C for 78 h, and the average reflectivity of the FBGs during the annealing process increases by ~50% compared to that before the annealing, which could be potentially applied to humidity insensitive high temperature measurement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Polymer Optical Fibers)
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7 pages, 1550 KiB  
Communication
Treatment of Mode Coupling in Step-Index Multimode Microstructured Polymer Optical Fibers by the Langevin Equation
by Svetislav Savović, Linqing Li, Isidora Savović, Alexandar Djordjevich and Rui Min
Polymers 2022, 14(6), 1243; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14061243 - 19 Mar 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1523
Abstract
By solving the Langevin equation, mode coupling in a multimode step-index microstructured polymer optical fibers (SI mPOF) with a solid core was investigated. The numerical integration of the Langevin equation was based on the computer-simulated Langevin force. The numerical solution of the Langevin [...] Read more.
By solving the Langevin equation, mode coupling in a multimode step-index microstructured polymer optical fibers (SI mPOF) with a solid core was investigated. The numerical integration of the Langevin equation was based on the computer-simulated Langevin force. The numerical solution of the Langevin equation corresponded to the previously reported theoretical data. We demonstrated that by solving the Langevin equation (stochastic differential equation), one can successfully treat a mode coupling in multimode SI mPOF as a stochastic process, since it is caused by its intrinsic random perturbations. Thus, the Langevin equation allowed for a stochastic mathematical description of mode coupling in SI mPOF. Regarding the efficiency and execution speed, the Langevin equation was more favorable than the power flow equation. Such knowledge is useful for the use of multimode SI mPOFs for potential sensing and communication applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Polymer Optical Fibers)
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