Special Issue "Materials and Technology: Dental 3D Printing"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Processing and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 March 2023 | Viewed by 702

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jingwei He
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China
Interests: molecule synthesis, dental materials, polymerization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Sufyan Garoushi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomaterials Science and Turku Clinical Biomaterials Center –TCBC, Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland
Interests: fiber reinforced composites, dental materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Lippo Lassila
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomaterials Science, Institute of Dentistry and BioCity Turku Biomaterial Research Program, University of Turku, Turku 20520, Finland
Interests: fiber reinforeced composites; biomechanics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Different additive manufacturing methods are rapidly increasing in dentistry. However, 3D printing technologies are very new and novel innovations are coming all the time. Furthermore, materials, especially polymeric materials, are increasingly covering widely all indication areas of dentistry. Few years ago eg. polymer based dental restorations materials are brought to market as a temporary use, but nowadays many materials with permanent indications are already established to market. As clinical requirement and demands of materials are increasing, more complex printing technology are coming available like multimaterial printing or printing fiber reinforced resin composites or printing different multilayered colour shades.

However, still lot of challenges exist with 3D polymeric materials that are already on the market and used clinically: post processing, stability of materials, storage time, printing accuracy, alternative green materials, even allergenic aspect for dental professionals or patients has to be considered.

Especially, the current heterogeneity of materials and printing technology is still challenging the dental community and there is a need to understand the risks and benefits of 3D printing technology.

This Special Issue welcomes all kinds of research topics including novel development or challenges/future perspectives in polymer-based 3D print dental materials or relative 3D print technology: Research articles, Review articles, and Short communications are all welcome.

Dr. Jingwei He
Dr. Sufyan Garoushi
Dr. Lippo Lassila
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • additive manufacturing
  • Dental 3D printing
  • polymeric material
  • s dental restorations materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Effect of Nitrogen Gas Post-Curing and Printer Type on the Mechanical Properties of 3D-Printed Hard Occlusal Splint Material
Polymers 2022, 14(19), 3971; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14193971 - 22 Sep 2022
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Abstract
Although three-dimensional (3D) printing is clinically convenient to fabricate occlusal splints, it is still unclear how the post-curing method and the printer type can affect 3D-printed splints. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of stroboscopic post-curing at a nitrogen gas (N2 [...] Read more.
Although three-dimensional (3D) printing is clinically convenient to fabricate occlusal splints, it is still unclear how the post-curing method and the printer type can affect 3D-printed splints. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of stroboscopic post-curing at a nitrogen gas (N2) atmosphere versus post-curing in an air atmosphere, as well as the printer type (liquid crystal display (LCD) and digital light processing (DLP)) on the mechanical properties of a 3D-printed hard-type occlusal splint material. Flexural strength, flexural modulus, Vickers hardness number (VHN), fracture toughness, degree of double bond conversion (DC), 3D microlayer structure, water sorption, and water solubility were evaluated. The post-curing method significantly affected all evaluated properties except fracture toughness and 3D microlayer structure, while the printer type significantly affected all evaluated properties except flexural strength and flexural modulus. VHN and DC were significantly higher, and the smoother surface was noticeably obtained when printed by LCD printer and post-cured at an N2 atmosphere. The current results suggested that the post-curing method and the printer type would play a role in the mechanical properties of the evaluated material and that the combination of post-curing at an N2 atmosphere and LCD printer could enhance its mechanical properties and surface smoothness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials and Technology: Dental 3D Printing)
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Article
Mechanical Properties and In Vitro Biocompatibility of Hybrid Polymer-HA/BAG Ceramic Dental Materials
Polymers 2022, 14(18), 3774; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym14183774 - 09 Sep 2022
Viewed by 250
Abstract
The aim of this study is to prepare hybrid polymer–ceramic dental materials for chairside computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) applications. The hybrid polymer–ceramic materials were fabricated via infiltrating polymerizable monomer mixtures into sintered hydroxyapatite/bioactive glass (HA/BAG) ceramic blocks and thermo-curing. The microstructure was observed [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to prepare hybrid polymer–ceramic dental materials for chairside computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) applications. The hybrid polymer–ceramic materials were fabricated via infiltrating polymerizable monomer mixtures into sintered hydroxyapatite/bioactive glass (HA/BAG) ceramic blocks and thermo-curing. The microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy and an energy-dispersive spectrometer. The phase structure was analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The composition ratio was analyzed by a thermogravimetric analyzer. The hardness was measured by a Vickers hardness tester. The flexural strength, flexural modulus, and compressive strength were measured and calculated by a universal testing machine. The growth of human gingival fibroblasts was evaluated by a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay and immunofluorescence staining. The results showed that the sintering temperature and BAG content affected the mechanical properties of the hybrid polymer–ceramic materials. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed that high-temperature sintering promoted the partial conversion of HA to β-tricalcium phosphate. The values of the hardness, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and compressive strength of all the hybrid polymer–ceramic materials were 0.89–3.51 GPa, 57.61–118.05 MPa, 20.26–39.77 GPa, and 60.36–390.46 MPa, respectively. The mechanical properties of the hybrid polymer–ceramic materials were similar to natural teeth. As a trade-off between flexural strength and hardness, hybrid polymer–ceramic material with 20 wt.% BAG sintered at 1000 °C was the best material. In vitro experiments confirmed the biocompatibility of the hybrid polymer–ceramic material. Therefore, the hybrid polymer–ceramic material is expected to become a new type of dental restoration material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials and Technology: Dental 3D Printing)
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