Special Issue "Vitamin C Metabolism in Plants"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Patricia L. Conklin

Biological Sciences Department, State University of New York at Cortland, Bowers Hall, Cortland, NY 13045, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ascorbic acid biosynthesis; oxidative stress; regulation; signal transduction
Guest Editor
Prof. Nick Smirnoff

School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QD, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +01392 725168
Interests: metabolism and functions of ascorbic acid; antioxidants; photoprotection; hydrogen peroxide signaling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is one of the most abundant soluble small molecules in plants and is intimately familiar to most people as an important dietary antioxidant. How essential this antioxidant and enzyme co-factor is to the health and development of plants has become apparent in recent years. Plants, protists and animals all synthesize ascorbic acid but via different pathways. Over the last decade, our understanding of how plants synthesize ascorbic acid has increased exponentially. It is apparent that the major pathway in green plants is via D-mannose and L-galactose (the Smirnoff/Wheeler pathway). Other pathways (for example via D-galacturonic acid) have also been proposed but not fully established. Additionally, more recently, our understanding of the products and pathways of ascorbate breakdown has increased greatly. This Special Issue of Plants will highlight recent research that has moved beyond basic pathway discovery towards an understanding of the regulation of ascorbic acid biosynthesis and catabolism, and our increased ability to manipulate plant ascorbic acid content.  

Dr. Patricia L. Conklin
Dr. Nick Smirnoff
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • L-ascorbic acid
  • vitamin C
  • antioxidant
  • L-galactose
  • vtc mutants
  • L-galactonolactone dehydrogenase
  • threonic acid
  • oxalic acid

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Light-Induced Vitamin C Accumulation in Tomato Fruits is Independent of Carbohydrate Availability
Received: 2 March 2019 / Revised: 22 March 2019 / Accepted: 2 April 2019 / Published: 3 April 2019
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Abstract
L-ascorbate (ASC) is essential for human health. Therefore, there is interest in increasing the ASC content of crops like tomato. High irradiance induces accumulation of ASC in green tomato fruits. The D-mannose/L-galactose biosynthetic pathway accounts for the most ASC in plants. The myo-inositol [...] Read more.
L-ascorbate (ASC) is essential for human health. Therefore, there is interest in increasing the ASC content of crops like tomato. High irradiance induces accumulation of ASC in green tomato fruits. The D-mannose/L-galactose biosynthetic pathway accounts for the most ASC in plants. The myo-inositol and galacturonate pathways have been proposed to exist but never identified in plants. The D-mannose/L-galactose starts from D-glucose. In a series of experiments, we tested the hypothesis that ASC levels depend on soluble carbohydrate content when tomato fruits ripen under irradiances that stimulate ASC biosynthesis. We show that ASC levels considerably increased when fruits ripened under light, but carbohydrate levels did not show a parallel increase. When carbohydrate levels in fruits were altered by flower pruning, no effects on ASC levels were observed at harvest or after ripening under irradiances that induce ASC accumulation. Artificial feeding of trusses with sucrose increased carbohydrate levels, but did not affect the light-induced ASC levels. We conclude that light-induced accumulation of ASC is independent of the carbohydrate content in tomato fruits. In tomato fruit treated with light, the increase in ASC was preceded by a concomitant increase in myo-inositol. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vitamin C Metabolism in Plants)
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Open AccessArticle
Dynamic Changes of Ascorbic Acid, Phenolics Biosynthesis and Antioxidant Activities in Mung Beans (Vigna radiata) until Maturation
Received: 11 February 2019 / Revised: 13 March 2019 / Accepted: 22 March 2019 / Published: 25 March 2019
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Abstract
To better understand the regulatory mechanism of phenolics and ascorbic acid accumulation as well as antioxidant activities in mung beans during legume development, the gene expression profiles of 25 key-coding genes in ascorbic acid and phenolics metabolic pathways were analyzed. As well as [...] Read more.
To better understand the regulatory mechanism of phenolics and ascorbic acid accumulation as well as antioxidant activities in mung beans during legume development, the gene expression profiles of 25 key-coding genes in ascorbic acid and phenolics metabolic pathways were analyzed. As well as the dynamitic changes of ascorbic acid, phenolic profiles and antioxidant activities with legume development were studied. The results indicated that gene expression profiles were closely related to the ascorbic acid and phenolics accumulation regularity during legume development. VrVTC2 and VrGME played important roles for ascorbic acid accumulation from 8 to 17 days after flowering (DAF). VrPAL and VrCHS exhibited positive correlations with daidzein and glycitin accumulation, and VrIFS had a strong positive correlation with glycitin biosynthesis. Antioxidant activities dramatically increased during mung bean maturing, which were significantly related to ascorbic acid and phenolics accumulation. Eight days after flowering was the essential stage for ascorbic acid and phenolics biosynthesis in mung beans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vitamin C Metabolism in Plants)
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