Special Issue "Nitrogen-Fixing Plants "

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. David A. Dalton Website E-Mail
Reed College, Department of Biology, Portland, OR 97202, United States
Interests: nitrogen fixation; antioxidants; reactive oxygen species; forest ecophysiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nitrogen fixation is a vital process for enhancing plant productivity in both agricultural and natural systems. As an alternative to nitrogen-based fertilizers, nitrogen fixation has the potential to support plant growth while reducing the harmful effects of nitrogen pollution and its accompanying problems of toxicity in ground water that result from nitrate accumulation and the creation of dead zones in downstream waters due to eutrophication. Nitrogen-based fertilizers have the further disadvantage of requiring huge amounts of fossil fuel for their synthesis in the Haber Bosch process. In many developing countries, the high cost of nitrogen fertilizers makes their use prohibitive. Major efforts have been carried out over the last century in order to understand the biochemistry and molecular biology of nitrogen fixation in plants. The stage is now set for applying this knowledge to improving the process and possibly extending the ability to new crop species such as cereals. This Special Issue will explore current developments concerning the limitations and potential promises of nitrogen fixation in plants as well as advances in the fundamentals of physiology, ecology, and molecular biology. 

Prof. David A. Dalton
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • nitrogen fixation
  • nitrogenase
  • nif genes
  • novel nitrogen-fixing systems
  • biotechnological and agronomical approaches
  • legumes
  • root nodules
  • Rhizobium

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Regulation of Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in Legume Root Nodules
Plants 2019, 8(9), 333; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8090333 - 06 Sep 2019
Abstract
In most legume nodules, the di-nitrogen (N2)-fixing rhizobia are present as organelle-like structures inside their root host cells. Many processes operate and interact within the symbiotic relationship between plants and nodules, including nitrogen (N)/carbon (C) metabolisms, oxygen flow through nodules, oxidative [...] Read more.
In most legume nodules, the di-nitrogen (N2)-fixing rhizobia are present as organelle-like structures inside their root host cells. Many processes operate and interact within the symbiotic relationship between plants and nodules, including nitrogen (N)/carbon (C) metabolisms, oxygen flow through nodules, oxidative stress, and phosphorous (P) levels. These processes, which influence the regulation of N2 fixation and are finely tuned on a whole-plant basis, are extensively reviewed in this paper. The carbonic anhydrase (CA)-phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)-malate dehydrogenase (MDH) is a key pathway inside nodules involved in this regulation, and malate seems to play a crucial role in many aspects of symbiotic N2 fixation control. How legumes specifically sense N-status and how this stimulates all of the regulatory factors are key issues for understanding N2 fixation regulation on a whole-plant basis. This must be thoroughly studied in the future since there is no unifying theory that explains all of the aspects involved in regulating N2 fixation rates to date. Finally, high-throughput functional genomics and molecular tools (i.e., miRNAs) are currently very valuable for the identification of many regulatory elements that are good candidates for accurately dissecting the particular N2 fixation control mechanisms associated with physiological responses to abiotic stresses. In combination with existing information, utilizing these abundant genetic molecular tools will enable us to identify the specific mechanisms underlying the regulation of N2 fixation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nitrogen-Fixing Plants )
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