Special Issue "Inorganic Nanoparticles for Cancer Immunotherapy and Diagnosis"

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanomedicine and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 July 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Nam-Hyuk Cho

Guest Editor
1. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03080, Korea;
2. Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03080, Korea
Interests: nanocomposites; vaccine; cancer; immunotherapy; host-pathogen interactions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The application of nanomaterials has enormously contributed to the technical advances in various biomedical fields. This Special Issue is focused on advanced platforms and technologies using inorganic nanomaterials for cancer immunotherapy and in vivo imaging to achieve enhanced therapeutic outcomes and diagnostic monitoring. Recent advances in nanotechnologies based on inorganic metals, carbon nanostructures, or others could be covered by the Special Issue. We believe your contribution, based on your expertise, would be a valuable addition to our collection.

Prof. Nam-Hyuk Cho
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • inorganic nanoparticles
  • nanocomposites
  • cancer
  • immunotherapy
  • in vivo imaging
  • diagnosis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Improving Tumor Retention of Effector Cells in Adoptive Cell Transfer Therapies by Magnetic Targeting
Pharmaceutics 2020, 12(9), 812; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12090812 - 27 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 710
Abstract
Adoptive cell transfer therapy is a promising anti-tumor immunotherapy in which effector immune cells are transferred to patients to treat tumors. However, one of its main limitations is the inefficient trafficking of inoculated effector cells to the tumor site and the small percentage [...] Read more.
Adoptive cell transfer therapy is a promising anti-tumor immunotherapy in which effector immune cells are transferred to patients to treat tumors. However, one of its main limitations is the inefficient trafficking of inoculated effector cells to the tumor site and the small percentage of effector cells that remain activated when reaching the tumor. Multiple strategies have been attempted to improve the entry of effector cells into the tumor environment, often based on tumor types. It would be, however, interesting to develop a more general approach, to improve and facilitate the migration of specific activated effector lymphoid cells to any tumor type. We and others have recently demonstrated the potential for adoptive cell transfer therapy of the combined use of magnetic nanoparticle-loaded lymphoid effector cells together with the application of an external magnetic field to promote the accumulation and retention of lymphoid cells in specific body locations. The aim of this review is to summarize and highlight the recent findings in the field of magnetic accumulation and retention of effector cells in tumors after adoptive transfer, and to discuss the possibility of using this approach for tumor targeting with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inorganic Nanoparticles for Cancer Immunotherapy and Diagnosis)
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Open AccessReview
Nanoparticle-Mediated Therapeutic Application for Modulation of Lysosomal Ion Channels and Functions
Pharmaceutics 2020, 12(3), 217; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12030217 - 02 Mar 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 869
Abstract
Applications of nanoparticles in various fields have been addressed. Nanomaterials serve as carriers for transporting conventional drugs or proteins through lysosomes to various cellular targets. The basic function of lysosomes is to trigger degradation of proteins and lipids. Understanding of lysosomal functions is [...] Read more.
Applications of nanoparticles in various fields have been addressed. Nanomaterials serve as carriers for transporting conventional drugs or proteins through lysosomes to various cellular targets. The basic function of lysosomes is to trigger degradation of proteins and lipids. Understanding of lysosomal functions is essential for enhancing the efficacy of nanoparticles-mediated therapy and reducing the malfunctions of cellular metabolism. The lysosomal function is modulated by the movement of ions through various ion channels. Thus, in this review, we have focused on the recruited ion channels for lysosomal function, to understand the lysosomal modulation through the nanoparticles and its applications. In the future, lysosomal channels-based targets will expand the therapeutic application of nanoparticles-associated drugs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inorganic Nanoparticles for Cancer Immunotherapy and Diagnosis)
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