Special Issue "Intranasal Administration: Potential Route as Diverse Targeting Systems"

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Drug Targeting and Design".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Tomoyuki Furubayashi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Kobe Pharmaceutical University, Kobe 658-8558, Japan
Interests: nasal absorption; cervical lymph node targeting; lymphatic delivery; powdery formulation; peptide drug delivery; brain targeting
Dr. Daisuke Inoue
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Noji-Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga, Japan
Interests: nasal absorption; nasal powder formulation; nose-to-brain; nasal drug delivery; mucosal absorption; cns drug delivery; formulation development; brain targeting

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The intranasal administration route can deliver drugs directly to the brain, central nervous system (CNS) region, and the lymphatic tissues, as well as through mucosal absorption. The drug delivery system using the intranasal administration is a useful tool for the development of new treatment strategies for various diseases (e.g., CNS diseases, tumour, and acute pain). This Special Issue will address the advances of the nasal drug delivery system, focusing the development of the drug delivery system to various target tissues (e.g., nose-to-brain, nose-to lymph, mucosal absorption, and nasal topical use). In addition, this Issue includes not only drug targeting to the brain and lymph, but also nasal formulation development such as newly dosage forms (powder, mucoadhesion, gelation, micro (nano) particulation, etc.), intranasal dissolution, and mucosal permeation.

Dr. Tomoyuki Furubayashi
Dr. Daisuke Inoue
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Intranasal administration
  • Brain targeting
  • Lymphatic delivery
  • Mucosal absorption
  • Nasal formulation development
  • Intranasal dissolution and permeation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Quality by Design Approach for the Development of Liposome Carrying Ghrelin for Intranasal Administration
Pharmaceutics 2021, 13(5), 686; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics13050686 - 10 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 677
Abstract
The therapeutic use of peptides has increasingly recognized in the development of new therapies. However, the susceptible enzymatic cleavage is a barrier that needs to overcome. Nose-to-brain delivery associated with liposomes can protect peptides against biodegradation and improve the accessibility to brain targets. [...] Read more.
The therapeutic use of peptides has increasingly recognized in the development of new therapies. However, the susceptible enzymatic cleavage is a barrier that needs to overcome. Nose-to-brain delivery associated with liposomes can protect peptides against biodegradation and improve the accessibility to brain targets. The aim was to develop a liposomal formulation as ghrelin carrier. The quality by design (QbD) approach was used as a strategy for method development. The initial risk assessments were carried out using a fishbone diagram. A screening design study was performed for the critical material attributes/critical process parameters (CMAs/CPPs) on critical quality attributes (CQAs). Liposomes were obtained by hydrating phospholipid films, followed by extrusion or homogenization, and coated with chitosan. The optimized liposome formulation was produced by high-pressure homogenization coated with chitosan, and the resulted were liposomes size 72.25 ± 1.46 nm, PDI of 0.300 ± 0.027, the zeta potential of 50.3 ± 1.46 mV, and encapsulation efficiency of 53.2%. Moreover, chitosan coating improved performance in ex vivo permeation and mucoadhesion analyzes when compared to the uncoated liposome. In this context, chitosan coating is essential for the performance of the formulations in the ex vivo permeation and mucoadhesion analyzes. The intranasal administration of ghrelin liposomes coated with chitosan offers an innovative opportunity to treat cachexia. Full article
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Review
Intranasal Administration for Pain: Oxytocin and Other Polypeptides
Pharmaceutics 2021, 13(7), 1088; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics13071088 - 16 Jul 2021
Viewed by 335
Abstract
Pain, particularly chronic pain, remains one of the most debilitating and difficult-to-treat conditions in medicine. Chronic pain is difficult to treat, in part because it is associated with plastic changes in the peripheral and central nervous systems. Polypeptides are linear organic polymers that [...] Read more.
Pain, particularly chronic pain, remains one of the most debilitating and difficult-to-treat conditions in medicine. Chronic pain is difficult to treat, in part because it is associated with plastic changes in the peripheral and central nervous systems. Polypeptides are linear organic polymers that are highly selective molecules for neurotransmitter and other nervous system receptors sites, including those associated with pain and analgesia, and so have tremendous potential in pain therapeutics. However, delivery of polypeptides to the nervous system is largely limited due to rapid degradation within the peripheral circulation as well as the blood–brain barrier. One strategy that has been shown to be successful in nervous system deposition of polypeptides is intranasal (IN) delivery. In this narrative review, we discuss the delivery of polypeptides to the peripheral and central nervous systems following IN administration. We briefly discuss the mechanism of delivery via the nasal–cerebral pathway. We review recent studies that demonstrate that polypeptides such as oxytocin, delivered IN, not only reach key pain-modulating regions in the nervous system but, in doing so, evoke significant analgesic effects. IN administration of polypeptides has tremendous potential to provide a non-invasive, rapid and effective method of delivery to the nervous system for chronic pain treatment and management. Full article
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