Special Issue "Transmission of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Genes: Unveiling the Jigsaw Pieces of a One Health Problem"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ana R. Freitas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Postdoc Researcher. UCIBIO-REQUIMTE, Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
Interests: bacteriology and antibiotic resistance; clinical microbiology; diagnostics and infectious diseases; surveillance; typing; public health; food safety; omics high-throughput methods; genetic basis for transmission of antibiotic resistance and typing of emergent antibiotic resistance mechanisms; epidemiology and evolution of Enterococcus from different hosts
Asst. Prof. Carla Novais
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Assistant Professor. UCIBIO-REQUIMTE, Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
Interests: bacteriology; resistance to antibiotics and other compounds (e.g., metals and disinfectants); clinical microbiology; food safety; surveillance; typing; epidemiology and ecology of Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Enterococcus, Staphylococcus); evolution of Enterococcus clones and mobile genetic elements

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The evolution of antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens is a complex and multifactorial process requiring urgent concerted global efforts. A One Health approach integrating human, animal, and environmental surveillance data is crucial to counteract the spread of multidrug-resistant pathogens and develop efficient control strategies. To better understand the dynamics influencing the selection and transmission of resistance, this Special Issue aims to bring together research studies related to the transmission of antibiotic-resistant (ABR) bacterial pathogens within and between different hosts and environments; the impact of emergent clones and mobile genetic elements in ABR persistence and dissemination; or focusing on different drivers promoting ABR transmission. Papers suggesting strategies to limit the transmission of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes are also welcome.

This issue intends to enlarge the available literature regarding the transmission of multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens in recent collections from both clinical and non-clinical contexts.

Dr. Ana R. Freitas
Asst. Prof. Carla Novais
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Transmission of bacterial pathogens
  • Antibiotic Resistance surveillance & epidemiology
  • Virulence & Biofilm production in antibiotic-resistant bacteria
  • Clones and mobile genetic elements promoting transmission of antibiotic resistance
  • Genomics and Bioinformatic Analysis
  • Genetics and Evolution
  • Infection prevention and control
  • One Health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
First Detection of Carbapenem-Resistant Escherichia fergusonii Strains Harbouring Beta-Lactamase Genes from Clinical Samples
Pathogens 2019, 8(4), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens8040164 - 25 Sep 2019
Abstract
Recently discovered extraintestinal Escherichia fergusonii obtained from non-clinical samples has exhibited the potential for acquiring multiple beta-lactamase genes, just like many extraintestinal Escherichia coli strains. Albeit, they are often omitted or classified as E. coli. This study aimed to, therefore, identify carbapenem-resistant [...] Read more.
Recently discovered extraintestinal Escherichia fergusonii obtained from non-clinical samples has exhibited the potential for acquiring multiple beta-lactamase genes, just like many extraintestinal Escherichia coli strains. Albeit, they are often omitted or classified as E. coli. This study aimed to, therefore, identify carbapenem-resistant extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing E. fergusonii isolates from clinical samples, determine their evolutionary relatedness using 16S rRNA sequencing analysis and screen for beta-lactamase genes. A total of 135 septic wound samples were obtained from patients on referral at a General Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. For the phenotypic identification of isolates from culture-positive samples, morphological, and physiological tests were carried out. Identities of the isolates harbouring beta-lactamase genes were assigned to their genus strains using the 16S rRNA sequencing. The Kirby Bauer disc diffusion technique and double-disc synergy test were used to screen isolates for multidrug resistance and ESBL production. Carbapenem-resistant ESBL producing isolates were screened for beta-lactamase genes in a polymerase chain reaction. Three E. fergusonii isolates (CR11, CR35 and CR49) were obtained during this study. E. fergusonii strains were motile, non-lactose and non-sorbitol fermenting but positive for cellobiose and adonitol fermentation. The I6S rRNA assigned the phenotypically identified isolates to E. fergusonii species. All three isolates were multidrug-resistant, carbapenem-resistant and ESBL producers. Isolates CR11 and CR35 harboured cefotaximase (CTX-M) and temoniera (TEM) beta-lactamase genes while CR49 harboured sulfhydryl variable (SHV) beta-lactamase gene. We herein report the detection of multiple beta-lactamase genes in carbapenem-resistant ESBL producing E. fergusonii from clinical samples. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Non-typhoidal Salmonella in the Pig Production Chain: A Comprehensive Analysis of Its Impact on Human Health
Pathogens 2019, 8(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens8010019 - 29 Jan 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Salmonellosis remains one of the most frequent foodborne zoonosis, constituting a worldwide major public health concern. The most frequent sources of human infections are food products of animal origin, being pork meat one of the most relevant. Currently, particular pig food production well-adapted [...] Read more.
Salmonellosis remains one of the most frequent foodborne zoonosis, constituting a worldwide major public health concern. The most frequent sources of human infections are food products of animal origin, being pork meat one of the most relevant. Currently, particular pig food production well-adapted and persistent Salmonella enterica serotypes (e.g., Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella 1,4,[5],12:i:-, Salmonella Derby and Salmonella Rissen) are frequently reported associated with human infections in diverse industrialized countries. The dissemination of those clinically-relevant Salmonella serotypes/clones has been related to the intensification of pig production chain and to an increase in the international trade of pigs and pork meat. Those changes that occurred over the years along the food chain may act as food chain drivers leading to new problems and challenges, compromising the successful control of Salmonella. Among those, the emergence of antibiotic resistance in non-typhoidal Salmonella associated with antimicrobials use in the pig production chain is of special concern for public health. The transmission of pig-related multidrug-resistant Salmonella serotypes, clones and/or genetic elements carrying clinically-relevant antibiotic resistance genes, frequently associated with metal tolerance genes, from pigs and pork meat to humans, has been reported and highlights the contribution of different drivers to the antibiotic resistance burden. Gathered data strengthen the need for global mandatory interventions and strategies for effective Salmonella control and surveillance across the pig production chain. The purpose of this review was to provide an overview of the role of pig and pork meat in human salmonellosis at a global scale, highlighting the main factors contributing to the persistence and dissemination of clinically-relevant pig-related Salmonella serotypes and clones. Full article
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