Special Issue "Streptomyces Microbiomes in Agriculture"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Giovanni Bubici
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto per la Protezione Sostenibile delle Piante, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Bari, Italy
Interests: plant pathology; soil-borne plant pathogens; beneficial microbes; soil microbiome; biological control; Verticillium; Pyrenocaheta; Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense; Streptomyces; screening for resistance; plant-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions; functional genomics; transcriptomics; metagenomics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Maria Isabella Prigigallo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto per la Protezione Sostenibile delle Piante, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin, Italy
Interests: beneficial microorganisms; soil microbiome; Phytophthora spp.; Fusarium; biological control; plant–microbe interaction; metagenomics; plant functional genomics; molecular plant pathology; plant genetic resistance
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Streptomycetes are the largest taxon of antibiotic producers in the microbial world. They are Gram positive, filamentous bacteria in the Streptomycetaceae family, with the genus Streptomyces as the sole member and more than 500 species. Streptomycetes are widely distributed in soil and rhizosphere, where they form dynamic assemblies representing nearly 40% of soil bacteria. They also colonize water and several other natural environments. Because of their production of antibiotics and a plethora of other bioactive secondary metabolites, streptomycetes receive a huge interest for biotechnological applications. In addition, their lifestyle makes them good competitors in the soil, as well as strong antagonists of plant pathogens. A huge amount of literature has been produced on the use of streptomycetes as biological control agents of plant diseases. On the other hand, biological control, including that relying on streptomycetes, has historically suffered from inconsistent results over the years and in various environments. Indeed, very few Streptomyces-based plant protection products have been released in the market. Therefore, it is important to identify critical points in the Streptomyces-mediated biocontrol, and possible improvements for a better biocontrol efficacy. For this purpose, “-omics” sciences offer new opportunities for a deep study of the interactions of streptomycetes with plants, pathogens, and other beneficial microbes.

For this Special Issue, we invite you to submit review articles and research results covering all aspects of the knowledge about Streptomyces microbiomes in agriculture, with the objectives to unveil the mechanistic aspects of biocontrol, suppressive soils or interactions with plants and other organisms, and the dynamics of streptomycetes assemblies under diverse natural and anthropological pressures. Reviews beyond the mere description of the literature and bringing to the light new evidence of scientific relevance thanks to a critical analysis of the past research will be particularly appreciated. Furthermore, primary and applied research opening novel, yet unexplored applications of streptomycetes is cherished.

We look forward to your contribution.

Dr. Giovanni Bubici
Dr. Maria Isabella Prigigallo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biological control
  • integrated disease management
  • soil/plant microbiome
  • soil-borne plant pathogens
  • suppressive soil
  • plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR)
  • endophytes
  • abiotic stresses
  • volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
  • induced systemic resistance
  • symbionts
  • antibiotics
  • plant–microbe interaction
  • microbe–microbe interaction
  • bioformulation
  • mycotoxin degradation or reduction
  • heavy metals
  • bioremediation

References:

  1. Chater, K.F. Recent advances in understanding Streptomyces. F1000Research 2006, 5, 2795.
  2. Chaurasia, A.; Meena, B.R.; Tripathi, A.N.; Pandey, K.K.; Rai, A.B.; Singh, B. Actinomycetes: An unexplored microorganisms for plant growth promotion and biocontrol in vegetable crops. World J. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 2018, 34, 132.
  3. Hasani, A.; Kariminik, A.; Issazadeh, K. Streptomycetes: Characteristics and their antimicrobial activities. Int. JAdvBiolBiomed. Res. 2014, 2, 63–75.
  4. Law, J.W.-F.; Ser, H.-L.; Khan, T.M.; Chuah, L.-H.; Pusparajah, P.; Chan, K.-G.; Goh, B.-H.; Lee, L.-H. The potential of Streptomyces as biocontrol agents against the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae (Pyricularia oryzae). Front. Microbiol. 2017, 8, 3.
  5. Pieterse, C.M.; Zamioudis, C.; Berendsen, R.L.; Weller, D.M.; Van Wees, S.C.; Bakker, P.A. Induced systemic resistance by beneficial microbes. Annu. Rev. Phytopathol. 2014, 52, 347–375.
  6. Sabaratnam, S.; Traquair, J.A. Formulation of a Streptomyces Biocontrol Agent for the Suppression of Rhizoctonia Damping-off in Tomato Transplants. Biol. Control 2002, 23, 245–253.
  7. Seipke, R.F.; Kaltenpoth, M.; Hutchings, M.I. Streptomyces as symbionts: an emerging and widespread theme? FEMS Microbiol. Rev. 2012, 36, 862–876.
  8. Shimizu, M. Endophytic actinomycetes: biocontrol agents and growth promoters. In Bacteria in Agrobiology: Plant Growth Responses, Maheshwari, D.K., ed.; Springer: Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany, 2011; pp. 201–220.
  9. Strap, J.L. Actinobacteria–Plant Interactions: A Boon to Agriculture. In Bacteria in Agrobiology: Plant Growth Responses, Maheshwari, D.K., ed.; Springer: Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany, 2011; pp. 285–307.
  10. Vetsigian, K.; Jajoo, R.; Kishony, R. Structure and evolution of Streptomyces interaction networks in soil and in silico. PLoS Biol. 2011, 9, e1001184.
  11. Viaene, T.; Langendries, S.; Beirinckx, S.; Maes, M.; Goormachtig, S. Streptomyces as a plant's best friend? FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 2016, 8, 92.
  12. Vurukonda, S.S.K.P.; Giovanardi, D.; Stefani, E. Plant growth promoting and biocontrol activity of Streptomyces spp. as endophytes. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 4, 19.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Article
Evaluation of Biocontrol Activities of Streptomyces spp. against Rice Blast Disease Fungi
Pathogens 2020, 9(2), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9020126 - 15 Feb 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1876
Abstract
Rhizosphere bacteria can positively influence plant growth by direct and indirect mechanisms. A total of 112 bacterial strains were isolated from the rhizosphere of rice and tested for plant beneficial activities such as siderophore production, cell-wall-degrading enzyme production, hydrogen cyanide (HCN) production and [...] Read more.
Rhizosphere bacteria can positively influence plant growth by direct and indirect mechanisms. A total of 112 bacterial strains were isolated from the rhizosphere of rice and tested for plant beneficial activities such as siderophore production, cell-wall-degrading enzyme production, hydrogen cyanide (HCN) production and antifungal activity against rice blast disease fungus. The actinomycetes count was 3.8 × 106 CFU/g soil. Streptomyces strains PC 12, D 4.1, D 4.3 and W1 showed strong growth inhibition of blast disease fungus, Pyricularia sp. (87.3%, 82.2%, 80.0% and 80.5%) in vitro. Greenhouse experiments revealed that rice plants treated with Streptomyces strain PC 12 recorded maximum plant height, root length and root dry weight compared to the control. Taxonomic characterization of this strain on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence led to its identification as Streptomyces palmae PC 12. Streptomyces palmae PC 12 may be used as biofertilizer to enhance the growth and productivity of commercially important rice cultivar RD6 and the biocontrol of blast disease fungus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Streptomyces Microbiomes in Agriculture)
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Review

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Review
Potential of Bioremediation and PGP Traits in Streptomyces as Strategies for Bio-Reclamation of Salt-Affected Soils for Agriculture
Pathogens 2020, 9(2), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9020117 - 13 Feb 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1473
Abstract
Environmental limitations influence food production and distribution, adding up to global problems like world hunger. Conditions caused by climate change require global efforts to be improved, but others like soil degradation demand local management. For many years, saline soils were not a problem; [...] Read more.
Environmental limitations influence food production and distribution, adding up to global problems like world hunger. Conditions caused by climate change require global efforts to be improved, but others like soil degradation demand local management. For many years, saline soils were not a problem; indeed, natural salinity shaped different biomes around the world. However, overall saline soils present adverse conditions for plant growth, which then translate into limitations for agriculture. Shortage on the surface of productive land, either due to depletion of arable land or to soil degradation, represents a threat to the growing worldwide population. Hence, the need to use degraded land leads scientists to think of recovery alternatives. In the case of salt-affected soils (naturally occurring or human-made), which are traditionally washed or amended with calcium salts, bio-reclamation via microbiome presents itself as an innovative and environmentally friendly option. Due to their low pathogenicity, endurance to adverse environmental conditions, and production of a wide variety of secondary metabolic compounds, members of the genus Streptomyces are good candidates for bio-reclamation of salt-affected soils. Thus, plant growth promotion and soil bioremediation strategies combine to overcome biotic and abiotic stressors, providing green management options for agriculture in the near future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Streptomyces Microbiomes in Agriculture)
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Review
Biocontrol of Cereal Crop Diseases Using Streptomycetes
Pathogens 2019, 8(2), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens8020078 - 13 Jun 2019
Cited by 37 | Viewed by 3649
Abstract
A growing world population and an increasing demand for greater food production requires that crop losses caused by pests and diseases are dramatically reduced. Concurrently, sustainability targets mean that alternatives to chemical pesticides are becoming increasingly desirable. Bacteria in the plant root microbiome [...] Read more.
A growing world population and an increasing demand for greater food production requires that crop losses caused by pests and diseases are dramatically reduced. Concurrently, sustainability targets mean that alternatives to chemical pesticides are becoming increasingly desirable. Bacteria in the plant root microbiome can protect their plant host against pests and pathogenic infection. In particular, Streptomyces species are well-known to produce a range of secondary metabolites that can inhibit the growth of phytopathogens. Streptomyces are abundant in soils and are also enriched in the root microbiomes of many different plant species, including those grown as economically and nutritionally valuable cereal crops. In this review we discuss the potential of Streptomyces to protect against some of the most damaging cereal crop diseases, particularly those caused by fungal pathogens. We also explore factors that may improve the efficacy of these strains as biocontrol agents in situ, as well as the possibility of exploiting plant mechanisms, such as root exudation, that enable the recruitment of microbial species from the soil to the root microbiome. We argue that a greater understanding of these mechanisms may enable the development of protective plant root microbiomes with a greater abundance of beneficial bacteria, such as Streptomyces species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Streptomyces Microbiomes in Agriculture)
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