Special Issue "Q Fever"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Eric Ghigo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
IHU-Méditerranée Infection, Marseille, France
Interests: Transmissible diseases and tropical pathologies; Lipopolysaccharide; Q fever; Coxiella burnetii; Phagosome; Planarians; Evolution; Antibacterial response

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Query fever so called Q fever is caused by Coxiella burnetii, a gram negative bacteria. The Q fever, is a zoonosis characterized by a lethal endocarditis. Because of its virulence Coxiella burnetii is considered as potential biowarfare and bioterrorism agent. Coxiella burnetii infect a wide range of animals and is an intracellular bacteria that replicates within a membrane-bound compartment. The introduction of the axenic culture of Coxiella burnetii allowed a better characterization of this pathogen. Because of the The genetic analysis of the various strain of Coxiella burnetii, the of virulence determinants are now better known as well the molecular variations in lipopolysaccharide a major outer membrane component, of Coxiella burnetii. The Q fever has a worldwide distribution, the immune response engage by the host during the Q fever is now well characterized, however is interestingly to note that the last epidemic outbreaks unravelled that the epidemiological features of the Q fever vary according to the geographic.

This special issue aims to take stock of the latest advances in research on Q fever and its agent, Coxiella burnetii, from a microbiological, clinical, genetic and immunological point of view, as well as from a cell biology point of view.

Dr. Eric Ghigo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Q fever
  • C. burnetii
  • Vectors
  • Phagosome
  • Immunity
  • Genomic
  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology
  • Clinical

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Validation of a Novel Commercial ELISA Test for the Detection of Antibodies against Coxiella burnetii
Pathogens 2020, 9(12), 1075; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9121075 - 21 Dec 2020
Viewed by 562
Abstract
Q fever is a zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii, a Gram-negative pathogen with a complex life cycle and a high impact on public and animal health all over the world. The symptoms are indistinguishable from those belonging to other diseases, and the [...] Read more.
Q fever is a zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii, a Gram-negative pathogen with a complex life cycle and a high impact on public and animal health all over the world. The symptoms are indistinguishable from those belonging to other diseases, and the disease could be symptomless. For these reasons, reliable laboratory tests are essential for an accurate diagnosis. The aim of this study was to validate a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test, named the Chorus Q Fever Phase II IgG and IgM Kit (DIESSE, Diagnostica Senese S.p.A), which is performed by an instrument named Chorus, a new device in medical diagnostics. This diagnostic test is employed for the detection of antibodies against C. burnetii Phase II antigens in acute disease. Our validation protocol was performed according to the Italian Accreditation Body (ACCREDIA) (Regulation UNI CEI EN ISO/IEC 17025:2018 and 17043:2010), OIE (World Organization for Animal Health), and Statement for Reporting Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD). Operator performance was evaluated along with the analytical specificity and sensitivity (ASp and ASe) and diagnostic accuracy of the kit, with parameters such as diagnostic specificity and sensitivity (DSp and DSe) and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV), in addition to the repeatability. According to the evaluated parameters, the diagnostic ELISA test was shown to be suitable for validation and commercialization as a screening method in human sera and a valid support for clinical diagnostics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Q Fever)
Open AccessArticle
Comparison of Coxiella burnetii Excretion between Sheep and Goats Naturally Infected with One Cattle-Associated Genotype
Pathogens 2020, 9(8), 652; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9080652 - 13 Aug 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1025
Abstract
The main reservoir of Coxiella (C.) burnetii are ruminants. They shed the pathogen through birth products, vaginal mucus, faeces and milk. A direct comparison of C. burnetii excretions between naturally infected sheep and goats was performed on the same farm to investigate species-specific [...] Read more.
The main reservoir of Coxiella (C.) burnetii are ruminants. They shed the pathogen through birth products, vaginal mucus, faeces and milk. A direct comparison of C. burnetii excretions between naturally infected sheep and goats was performed on the same farm to investigate species-specific differences. The animals were vaccinated with an inactivated C. burnetii phase I vaccine at the beginning of the study period for public health reasons. Vaginal and rectal swabs along with milk specimens were taken monthly during the lambing period and once again at the next lambing season. To estimate the environmental contamination of the animals’ housings, nasal swabs from every animal were taken simultaneously. Moreover, dust samples from the windowsills and straw beddings were collected. All samples were examined by qPCR targeting the IS1111 gene and the MLVA/VNTR typing method was performed. Whole genome sequencing was applied to determine the number of IS1111 copies followed by a calculation of C. burnetii genome equivalents of each sample. The cattle-associated genotype C7 was detected containing 29 IS1111 copies. Overall, goats seem to shed more C. burnetii through vaginal mucus and in particular shed more and for longer via the rectal route than sheep. This is supported by the larger quantities of C. burnetii DNA detected in caprine nasal swabs and environmental samples compared to the ovine ones. Transmission of C. burnetii from cattle to small ruminants must also be considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Q Fever)
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Open AccessBrief Report
New Genotypes of Coxiella burnetii Circulating in Brazil and Argentina
Pathogens 2020, 9(1), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9010030 - 28 Dec 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1433
Abstract
Coxiella burnetii, the zoonotic agent of Q fever, has a worldwide distribution. Despite the vast information about the circulating genotypes in Europe and North America, there is a lack of data regarding C. burnetii strains in South America. Here, we show the [...] Read more.
Coxiella burnetii, the zoonotic agent of Q fever, has a worldwide distribution. Despite the vast information about the circulating genotypes in Europe and North America, there is a lack of data regarding C. burnetii strains in South America. Here, we show the presence of novel multispacer sequence typing (MST) genotypes of C. burnetii in two clusters detected in Brazil and Argentina that seem to be distant in parenthood. Argentinian strains isolated from a tick belongs to a new phylogenetic branch of C. burnetii, and the Brazilians strains may be related to MST 20 and 61. Multilocus variable number tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) typing provided a deeper resolution that may be related to host clusters of bovines, caprine, ovine, and ticks. Our results corroborate with the reports of geotypes of C. burnetii. Thus, we highlight the need for more genotyping studies to understand the genetic diversity of C. burnetii in South America and to confirm the hypothesis of host-related genotypes. We also emphasize the importance of virulence studies for a better understanding of Q fever in the region, which may help in surveillance and disease prevention programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Q Fever)
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