Special Issue "Carcinogenic and Anti-carcinogenic Bacteria"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817). This special issue belongs to the section "Bacterial Pathogens".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Tomasz M. Karpiński
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chair and Department of Medical Microbiology, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, Wieniawskiego 3, 61-712 Poznań, Poland
Interests: microbiology; molecular biology; microbial pathogenesis; bacterial proteins and toxins; antimicrobials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For many years, the most known bacterial carcinogen was Helicobacter pylori. With the development of science, especially molecular diagnostics, including NGS, it has been noticed that other bacteria may also be involved in cancer. A particular role is currently attributed to oral pathogens (e.g., Streptococcus sp., Prevotella sp., Fusobacterium sp., Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Capnocytophaga gingivalis). These pathogens can have an impact on the development of oral and esophageal cancers. Many works have also shown that mainly Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis play an important role in the development of colorectal and pancreatic cancer. On the other hand, already in the nineteenth century, Dr. William Coley presented anti-cancer microbes, now called the Coley’s toxin. Anti-carcinogenic activity may also exert probiotic bacteria (e.g., Lactobacillus sp.). For this Special Issue, we invite you to send original or review papers on aspects of bacterial carcinogenesis and the anti-cancer activity of bacteria.

Assoc. Prof. Tomasz Karpiński
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carcinogenic bacteria
  • anti-cancer bacteria
  • chronic inflammation
  • antiapoptotic activity
  • cancerogenic substances
  • probiotics
  • pathogenesis
  • virulence factors

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Single Donor FMT Reverses Microbial/Immune Dysbiosis and Induces Clinical Remission in a Rat Model of Acute Colitis
Pathogens 2021, 10(2), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10020152 - 02 Feb 2021
Viewed by 397
Abstract
Deviation in the gut microbial composition is involved in various pathologies, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Faecal microbiota transplant (FMT) can act as a promising approach to treat IBD by which changes in microbiome can be reversed and homeostasis restored. Therefore, the aim [...] Read more.
Deviation in the gut microbial composition is involved in various pathologies, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Faecal microbiota transplant (FMT) can act as a promising approach to treat IBD by which changes in microbiome can be reversed and homeostasis restored. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of FMT on the remission of acute inflammatory response using dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced rat colitis model. Faecal microbial communities were analysed using the 16S rRNA approach, and clinical manifestations together with histological/haematological/biochemical/immunological analyses were assessed. Our study demonstrated significant shifts in the dominant species of microbiota under inflammatory conditions induced by DSS and evident restoration effect of FMT treatment on microbial composition. These faecal microbial alterations in FMT-treated rats led to a relative restoration of colon length, and a significant decrease in both epithelium damage and disease severity, which was reflected in lower serum pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Haematological/biochemical parameters in DSS-treated animals showed signs of anaemia with a significant reduction in red blood cell count together with increasing levels of total bilirubin, creatinine and phosphorus suggesting potential protective effect of FMT. These results support FMT as a valuable therapeutic strategy to control inflammation during acute colitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carcinogenic and Anti-carcinogenic Bacteria)
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