Special Issue "Thin Films: Deposition, Growth and Characterization Techniques"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanofabrication and Nanomanufacturing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Yong-Jun Oh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Hanbat National University (HNU), Yusong, Daejeon 302-719, Republic of Korea
Interests: Material Characterization; Nanomaterials Thin Film Nanotechnology; Material Characteristics; Thin Films Deposition; Nanostructured Materials; Chemical Vapor Deposition; Functional Materials; Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Thin Film Processing; Films; Pulsed Laser Deposition; RF Sputtering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Solid thin film technology plays an important role as a key elemental technology for producing various devices, including energy-generating systems, biological and environmental sensing devices, integrated electronic and magnetic devices, or optical and plasmonic devices. The current breakthroughs in device technologies demand more advanced thin film technologies in micro- or nano-scales.

With its basis on material science, thin film technology encompasses a fairly wide range of topics within engineering. Its common topics consist of the functionality of thin film as compared to bulk, the morphological and microstructural changes in thin film surfaces and in the interface with its adjacent material according to material types and processing conditions, the instability of thin films due to its high surface-to-volume ratio, and the formation of new intermediate layers through the reactions of thin films to substrates or other adjacent materials. In-depth research on these subjects will greatly inspire the creation of new hierarchical devices. 

In this Special Issue, we encourage submissions on novel deposition and material processing of thin films on hard or flexible substrates, technologies applying thin films to devices, and innovative uses of thin films through material selection and processing. We also welcome experimental, theoretical or phenomenological studies on the formation, growth, and instability of thin films, thin film crystallography, the interfacial phenomena between thin films and substrates, and characterization of various properties of thin films in devices.

It is my pleasure to invite your contribution to this Special Issue.

Prof. Yong-Jun Oh
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Fabrication of thin film and nanostructured materials
  • Application of thin film for devices
  • Optical, electrical or other functional properties of thin film
  • Surface or interfacial behavior
  • Thin film crystallography or epitaxy
  • Thin film characterization

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Preparation of High-Performance Metal-Free UV/Near Infrared-Shielding Films for Human Skin Protection
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(8), 1954; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11081954 - 29 Jul 2021
Viewed by 455
Abstract
A series of metal-free UV/near infrared (NIR)-shielding coatings are successfully fabricated by shielded cathodic arc plasma evaporation (CAPE) and substrate-biased RF magnetron sputtering processes. The UV/NIR-shielding coatings comprising quarter-wave stacks of TiO2/SiO2 multilayers and high-conductivity sputter-deposited ITO films with a [...] Read more.
A series of metal-free UV/near infrared (NIR)-shielding coatings are successfully fabricated by shielded cathodic arc plasma evaporation (CAPE) and substrate-biased RF magnetron sputtering processes. The UV/NIR-shielding coatings comprising quarter-wave stacks of TiO2/SiO2 multilayers and high-conductivity sputter-deposited ITO films with a thickness in the range of 200–600 nm could block IRA and IRB radiations, respectively. The total thicknesses of UV/near infrared-shielding films are in the range from 375 nm to 1513.8 nm. The anatase-phase TiO2 films with absorption edge located at ∼375 nm were deposited by shielded CAPE at ∼100 °C. Further, the well-crystallized ITO films were found to have high free-electron concentrations (1.12 × 1021 cm−3), resulting in strong absorption of IRB due to the plasmon resonance absorption. The optimal optical design and ITO film thickness were investigated, and the TiO2(SiO2/TiO2)3 multilayer combined with an ITO film thickness of 400 nm was found to provide a high NIR-shielding rate of 94.8%, UVB to UVA-shielding rate of 92.7%, and average visible light transmittance of 68.1%. Further, human skin cells protected by a UV/NIR-shielding coating showed significantly decreased reactive oxygen species generation and inflammatory cytokine expression as compared to those of unprotected cells. The results demonstrate that the development of multifunction coatings have potential for transparent heat insulation windows and human skin protection against UV/IR radiations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thin Films: Deposition, Growth and Characterization Techniques)
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