Special Issue "Textiles Nanotechnology"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 June 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Juan P. Hinestroza
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Fiber Science and Apparel Design, College of Human Ecology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-4401, USA
Interests: textiles; nanotechnology; nanofibers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Textiles were the main products of the industrial revolution in the early 1800s. In the late 1900s, the nanoscience revolution enabled the synthesis of materials with molecular precision. The combination of nanomaterials and textiles has exploded in the last 20 years, offering unique opportunities for the creation of new functionalities in traditional textiles as well as new textile materials.
The present Special Issue of Nanomaterials aims at presenting the current state-of-the-art in the use of nanotechnology in textiles—new fibers, new finishes, new functionalities, new metrologies, and new integrative approaches for manufacturing and modifying fibrous materials. The scope of this Special Issue includes all types of fibrous materials from filters to apparel, from carpets to geotextiles, from electronic textiles to protective clothing. We will have invited contributions from leading groups in the field offering a balanced perspective of the current state-of-the-art and discussions on the future direction for the use of nanotechnology in textiles.

I look forward to receive your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Juan P. Hinestroza
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • textile nanomaterials
  • fibrous nanomaterials
  • nanotechnology in textiles

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Continuous Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Flexible Composite Film
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(10), 182; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano6100182 - 12 Oct 2016
Cited by 13
Abstract
To investigate the effect of continuous multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the thermal and mechanical properties of composites, we propose a fabrication method for a buckypaper-filled flexible composite film prepared by a two-step process involving buckypaper fabrication using vacuum filtration of MWCNTs, and [...] Read more.
To investigate the effect of continuous multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the thermal and mechanical properties of composites, we propose a fabrication method for a buckypaper-filled flexible composite film prepared by a two-step process involving buckypaper fabrication using vacuum filtration of MWCNTs, and composite film fabrication using the dipping method. The thermal conductivity and tensile strength of the composite film filled with the buckypaper exhibited improved results, respectively 76% and 275% greater than those of the individual MWCNT-filled composite film. It was confirmed that forming continuous MWCNT fillers is an important factor which determines the physical characteristics of the composite film. In light of the study findings, composite films using buckypaper as a filler and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as a flexible matrix have sufficient potential to be applied as a heat-dissipating material, and as a flexible film with high thermal conductivity and excellent mechanical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Textiles Nanotechnology)
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Open AccessArticle
Monitoring Damage Propagation in Glass Fiber Composites Using Carbon Nanofibers
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(9), 169; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano6090169 - 10 Sep 2016
Cited by 8
Abstract
In this work, we report the potential use of novel carbon nanofibers (CNFs), dispersed during fabrication of glass fiber composites to monitor damage propagation under static loading. The use of CNFs enables a transformation of the typically non-conductive glass fiber composites into new [...] Read more.
In this work, we report the potential use of novel carbon nanofibers (CNFs), dispersed during fabrication of glass fiber composites to monitor damage propagation under static loading. The use of CNFs enables a transformation of the typically non-conductive glass fiber composites into new fiber composites with appreciable electrical conductivity. The percolation limit of CNFs/epoxy nanocomposites was first quantified. The electromechanical responses of glass fiber composites fabricated using CNFs/epoxy nanocomposite were examined under static tension loads. The experimental observations showed a nonlinear change of electrical conductivity of glass fiber composites incorporating CNFs versus the stress level under static load. Microstructural investigations proved the ability of CNFs to alter the polymer matrix and to produce a new polymer nanocomposite with a connected nanofiber network with improved electrical properties and different mechanical properties compared with the neat epoxy. It is concluded that incorporating CNFs during fabrication of glass fiber composites can provide an innovative means of self-sensing that will allow damage propagation to be monitored in glass fiber composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Textiles Nanotechnology)
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Open AccessArticle
Flexible Textile-Based Organic Transistors Using Graphene/Ag Nanoparticle Electrode
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(8), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano6080147 - 16 Aug 2016
Cited by 8
Abstract
Highly flexible and electrically-conductive multifunctional textiles are desirable for use in wearable electronic applications. In this study, we fabricated multifunctional textile composites by vacuum filtration and wet-transfer of graphene oxide films on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) textile in association with embedding Ag [...] Read more.
Highly flexible and electrically-conductive multifunctional textiles are desirable for use in wearable electronic applications. In this study, we fabricated multifunctional textile composites by vacuum filtration and wet-transfer of graphene oxide films on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) textile in association with embedding Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) to improve the electrical conductivity. A flexible organic transistor can be developed by direct transfer of a dielectric/semiconducting double layer on the graphene/AgNP textile composite, where the textile composite was used as both flexible substrate and conductive gate electrode. The thermal treatment of a textile-based transistor enhanced the electrical performance (mobility = 7.2 cm2·V−1·s−1, on/off current ratio = 4 × 105, and threshold voltage = −1.1 V) due to the improvement of interfacial properties between the conductive textile electrode and the ion-gel dielectric layer. Furthermore, the textile transistors exhibited highly stable device performance under extended bending conditions (with a bending radius down to 3 mm and repeated tests over 1000 cycles). We believe that our simple methods for the fabrication of graphene/AgNP textile composite for use in textile-type transistors can potentially be applied to the development of flexible large-area electronic clothes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Textiles Nanotechnology)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Recent Advances in Research on the Synthetic Fiber Based Silica Aerogel Nanocomposites
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(2), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano7020044 - 16 Feb 2017
Cited by 16
Abstract
The presented paper contains a brief review on the synthesis and characterization of silica aerogels and its nanocomposites with nanofibers and fibers based on a literature study over the past twenty years and my own research. Particular attention is focused on carbon fiber-based [...] Read more.
The presented paper contains a brief review on the synthesis and characterization of silica aerogels and its nanocomposites with nanofibers and fibers based on a literature study over the past twenty years and my own research. Particular attention is focused on carbon fiber-based silica aerogel nanocomposites. Silica aerogel is brittle in nature, therefore, it is necessary to improve this drawback, e.g., by polymer modification or fiber additives. Nevertheless, there are very few articles in the literature devoted to the synthesis of silica aerogel/fiber nanocomposites, especially those focusing on carbon fibers and nanofibers. Carbon fibers are very interesting materials, namely due to their special properties: high conductivity, high mechanical properties in relation to very low bulk densities, high thermal stability, and chemical resistance in the silica aerogel matrix, which can help enhance silica aerogel applications in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Textiles Nanotechnology)
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