Special Issue "Identification and Quantification of Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Synthesis, Interfaces and Nanostructures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2023.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Hubert Rauscher
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
European Commission Joint Research Centre, Ispra, Italy
Interests: nanomaterials identification and characterisation; advanced materials; nanosafety; definition of nanomaterial; regulatory science; policy support

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The identification and quantification of nanomaterials is currently a very active field of research. In view of the numerous ongoing regulatory activities addressing nanomaterials (e.g. amendments of nanospecific provisions in the REACH, Novel Food, Cosmetics and Medical Devices Regulations in Europe, rules and decisions on nanomaterials by US EPA and US FDA) manufacturers and regulators are in urgent need of scientific and technical progress to meet new regulatory requirements for nanomaterials. Identification and quantification of nanomaterials is a key requirement in this context and useful for innovators already in the material development phase to predict classification as nanomaterial (or the contrary) and to anticipate regulatory requirements for the final product. Enforcement laboratories need to be able to assess not only raw materials at the product ingredient level, but they must be able to analyse the final products on the market to identify and quantify the presence of a nanomaterial. Currently, there is an emerging issue with nanoplastics, which poses particular analytical and conceptual challenges. There has been some progress in recent years regarding the identification and quantification of nanomaterials as raw material, but for final products and materials which are difficult to analyse, such as nanoplastics, this is still extremely challenging.


Dr. Hubert Rauscher
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterial identification
  • nanomaterial quantification
  • particle measurement methods (quantitative and qualitative)
  • proxy methods
  • reference materials and standardisation
  • nanomaterials in products, formulations, and in the environment
  • safety of nanomaterials
  • nanoforms
  • nanoplastics
  • advanced nanomaterials

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Correlative Analysis of the Dimensional Properties of Bipyramidal Titania Nanoparticles by Complementing Electron Microscopy with Other Methods
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(12), 3359; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11123359 - 10 Dec 2021
Viewed by 572
Abstract
In this paper, the accurate determination of the size and size distribution of bipyramidal anatase nanoparticles (NPs) after deposition as single particles on a silicon substrate by correlative Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis is described as a new [...] Read more.
In this paper, the accurate determination of the size and size distribution of bipyramidal anatase nanoparticles (NPs) after deposition as single particles on a silicon substrate by correlative Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis is described as a new measurement procedure for metrological purposes. The knowledge of the exact orientation of the NPs is a crucial step in extracting the real 3D dimensions of the particles. Two approaches are proposed to determine the geometrical orientation of individual nano-bipyramides: (i) AFM profiling along the long bipyramid axis and (ii) stage tilting followed by SEM imaging. Furthermore, a recently developed method, Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD), which needs preparation of the crystalline NPs on electron-transparent substrates such as TEM grids, has been tested with respect to its capability of identifying the geometrical orientation of the individual NPs. With the NPs prepared homogeneously on a TEM grid, the transmission mode in a SEM, i.e., STEM-in-SEM (or T-SEM), can be also applied to extract accurate projection dimensions of the nanoparticles from the same sample area as that analysed by SEM, TKD and possibly AFM. Finally, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) can be used as an ensemble technique able to measure the NPs in liquid suspension and, with ab-initio knowledge of the NP shape from the descriptive imaging techniques, to provide traceable NP size distribution and particle concentration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Identification and Quantification of Nanomaterials)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Theoretical considerations of parameter effects on NM assessment by spICP-MS
Authors: Daniel Rosenkranz; et al.
Affiliation: Head of Unit Product Research and Nanotechnology

Title: Direct evaluation of NM dissolution in complex media by flow-injection spICP-MS
Authors: Yves Hachenberger; et al.
Affiliation: Department of Chemical and Product Safety, German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR).

Title: Correlative analysis of the dimensional properties of bipyramidal Titania nanoparticles by complementing electron microscopy with other methods
Authors: Loïc Crouzier; Nicolas Feltin; Alexandra Delvallée; Francesco Pellegrino; Valter Maurino; Grzegorz Cios; Tomasz Tokarski; Christoph Salzmann; Jérôme Deumer; Christian Gollwitzer; Vasile-Dan Hodoroaba
Affiliation: Laboratoire National de Métrologie et d'Essais
Abstract: In this paper, the accurate determination of the size and size distribution of bipyramidal anatase nanoparticles (NPs) after deposition as single particles on a silicon substrate by correlative Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis is described as a new measurement procedure for metrological purposes. The knowledge of the exact orientation of the NPs is a crucial step in extracting the real 3D dimensions of the particles. Two approaches are proposed to determine the geometrical orientation of individual nano-bipyramides: i) AFM profiling along the long bipyramid axis and ii) stage tilting followed by SEM imaging. Furthermore, a recently developed method, Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD), which needs preparation of the crystalline NPs on electron-transparent substrates such as TEM grids, has been tested with respect to its capability of identifying the geometrical orientation of the individual NPs. With the NPs prepared homogeneously on a TEM grid, the transmission mode in a SEM, i.e. STEM-in-SEM (or T-SEM), can be also applied to extract accurate projection dimensions of the nanoparticles from the same sample area as that analysed by SEM, TKD and possibly AFM. Finally, Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) can be used as an ensemble technique able to measure the NPs in liquid suspension and, with ab-initio knowledge of the NP shape from the descriptive imaging techniques, to provide traceable NP size distribution and particle concentration.

Title: Determination of the transport efficiency in spICP-MS analysis using conventional sample introduction systems: an interlaboratory comparison study
Authors: Otmar Geiss a*,Ivana Bianchi a, Guillaume Bucher b, Eveline Verleysen c, Frederic Brassinne c, Jan Mastc, Katrin Loeschner d, Lucas Givelet d, Francesco Cubadda e, Francesca Ferraris e, Andrea Raggi e
Affiliation: a European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra, Italy b Service Commun des Laboratoires (SCL), Pessac, France c Sciensano, Trace Elements and Nanomaterials, Brussels, Belgium d Division for Food Technology, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark e Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS), National Institute of Health, Rome, Italy f Wageningen Food Safety Research, part of Wageningen University & Research, Bussiness Unit Contaminants & Toxicology, Wageningen, the Netherlands g Max Rubner-Institut (MRI), Federal Research Institute of Nutrition and Food, Department of Food Technology and Bioprocess Engineering, Karlsruhe, Germany h National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, United States
Abstract: Single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) has become increasingly popular for metal/metal-oxide (nano)particle analysis in the last years. In spICP-MS, only a fraction of the nebulized suspension effectively reaches the plasma, the precise determination of which is fundamental for the correct determination of both particle number-concentration and size. The two most common methods to determine the transport efficiency are the particle size (TES)- and the particle frequency (TEF) methods. In the present study, the transport efficiency was systematically determined on three different days with six carefully characterised commercially available gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-suspensions and in seven expert laboratories using different ICP-MS instruments and spICP-MS softwares, applying both the TES and TEF methods. The TEF method systematically resulted in lower transport efficiencies. The entity of this difference depended largely on the choice and storage conditions of the nanoparticle suspensions used for the determination. The TES method is recommended when the principal measurement objective is particle size. If the main aim of the measurement is the determination of the particle-number concentration, the TEF approach should be preferred as particle losses occurs equally during the determination of the transport efficiency and sample analysis.  Keywords: single particle ICP-MS, transport efficiency, gold nanoparticles

Title: Counting rules on electron microscopic images - theory and practice
Authors: H. Bresch, D. Hodoroaba, H. Rauscher
Affiliation: -
Abstract: will be announced soon

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