Special Issue "Nanostructured Porous Carbon based 3D Architectures"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 August 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jun Chen

ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Intelligent Polymer Research Institute, Australian Institute of Innovative Materials, University of Wollongong, ACES/IPRI, AIIM, Innovation Campus, Squires Way, Fairy Meadow, NSW 2519, Australia
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Interests: energy devices; catalysis; electro-/bio-interfaces; nano/micro-materials; 2D/3D electrode design and fabrication
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Dongjiang Yang

Collaborative Innovation Center for Marine Biomass Fibers, Materials and Textiles of Shandong Province, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Qingdao University, 308 Ningxia Road, Shinan District, Qingdao, Shandong, China
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Interests: Flexible energy storage devices based on marine biological polysaccharides; Development of monatomic catalysts; Flame retardant solid electrolyte for supercapacitors; Synthesis and assembly of the size controlled cellulose nanosils
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Liangxu Lin

The State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Institute of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, 947 Heping Avenue, Qingshan District, Wuhan 430081, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: 2D/3D materials design and fabrication; energy conversion and storage devices; catalysis; materials interfaces

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanostructured porous carbon-based 3D architectures have attracted tremendous attention as next-generation active materials templates due to their extraordinary chemical and physical properties. Furthermore, nanostructured porous carbon-based 3D architectures for versatile devices can greatly improve energy efficiency because of their largely expanded working volumes, multiplexed conduction networks, 3D interfacing, and intercalation with other system components (e.g., electrolytes, reactants). Thus, 3D architecture carbonaceous materials have been widely explored and studied for promising electronic, optoelectronic, sensor, energy, structural, and bio applications.

Especially, this Special Issue intends to highlight recent advances in preparation/fabrication approaches for multidimensional nanostructured porous carbon-based architectures in diverse device applications, enabling exotic physical, chemical, electrical, and optical properties. This Special Issue welcomes papers sharing research and advances in related fields, which demonstrate or summarize significant advances in the synthesis and application of nanostructured porous carbon-based 3D architectures in various systems, including, but not limited to, Li (Na, K)-ion batteries, supercapacitors, optoelectronic applications, and insights into the structure–property relation in these new nanostructured materials.

Prof. Dr. Jun Chen
Prof. Dr. Dongjiang Yang
Prof. Dr. Liangxu Lin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • 3D architectures
  • Porous Carbonaceous material
  • Nanostructure
  • Materials Synthesis
  • Device fabrication
  • Electrochemical Properties
  • Analysis
  • Simulations

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Moss-Derived Mesoporous Carbon as Bi-Functional Electrode Materials for Lithium–Sulfur Batteries and Supercapacitors
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(1), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010084
Received: 16 December 2018 / Revised: 1 January 2019 / Accepted: 6 January 2019 / Published: 10 January 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3944 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, we reported a moss-derived biomass porous carbon (MPC) as a bi-functional electrode material for both the lithium–sulfur battery and the supercapacitor. The MPC was prepared from a high-temperature calcination procedure using the moss as the carbonaceous precursor. Using NaOH, the [...] Read more.
In this work, we reported a moss-derived biomass porous carbon (MPC) as a bi-functional electrode material for both the lithium–sulfur battery and the supercapacitor. The MPC was prepared from a high-temperature calcination procedure using the moss as the carbonaceous precursor. Using NaOH, the MPC was activated to give a mesoporous structure with a high specific surface area (1057.1 m2 g−1) and large pore volume (0.72 cm3 g−1). When it was used as the cathode material in lithium–sulfur batteries, the MPC material realized a sulfur loading and exhibited a remarkably improved electrochemical performance, i.e., a high discharge capacity of 1070 mAh g−1 at 0.1 C. This activated MPC also worked well as a capacitive electrode in supercapacitors, demonstrating a high specific capacitance of 332 F g−1 (scan rate of 1.0 A g−1) and a high capacity retention > 97% in a long-term cycle of 1000 charge/discharges. This work demonstrated a facile method for the utilization of activated waste biomass material for future clean energy applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Porous Carbon based 3D Architectures)
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Open AccessArticle Significant Enhancement of the Visible Light Photocatalytic Properties in 3D BiFeO3/Graphene Composites
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(1), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9010065
Received: 6 December 2018 / Revised: 26 December 2018 / Accepted: 29 December 2018 / Published: 5 January 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5036 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3, BFO) submicron cubes and 3D BFO/graphene composite materials were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal process. The crystallization processes of the 3D BFO/graphene composites with different graphene oxide (GO) concentrations were studied for their visible light photocatalytic properties. Compared [...] Read more.
Bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3, BFO) submicron cubes and 3D BFO/graphene composite materials were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal process. The crystallization processes of the 3D BFO/graphene composites with different graphene oxide (GO) concentrations were studied for their visible light photocatalytic properties. Compared to the single BFO submicron cubes, 3D BFO/graphene composites have greatly improved photocatalytic activity. A high photocatalytic performance is obtained at a GO concentration of 3 mg/mL, with the degradation rate of methylene blue (MB) dye reaching up to 92% in 140 min. The enhancement of photocatalytic activity can be attributed to the large specific surface area and 3D architecture of 3D composites, which provide more transport paths to effectively improve the separation rate of photo-generated electrons and holes. Therefore, 3D BFO/graphene composites have a broad prospect of application in the field of photocatalysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Porous Carbon based 3D Architectures)
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Open AccessArticle Dopamine Assisted One-Step Pyrolysis of Glucose for the Preparation of Porous Carbon with A High Surface Area
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(10), 854; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8100854
Received: 27 September 2018 / Revised: 16 October 2018 / Accepted: 18 October 2018 / Published: 19 October 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5245 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Herein, a facile dopamine assisted one-pot synthesis approach is proposed for the preparation of porous carbon with a specific surface area (SSA) up to 2593 m2/g through the direct pyrolysis of a mixture of glucose, NH4Cl, and dopamine hydrochloride [...] Read more.
Herein, a facile dopamine assisted one-pot synthesis approach is proposed for the preparation of porous carbon with a specific surface area (SSA) up to 2593 m2/g through the direct pyrolysis of a mixture of glucose, NH4Cl, and dopamine hydrochloride (DAH). The glucose is adopted as the carbon source and foaming agent, NH4Cl is used as the blowing agent, and DAH is served as collaborative carbon precursor as well as the nitrogen source for the first time. The effect of dopamine on the component, structure, and SSA of the as-prepared porous carbon materials are systematically studied. The moderate addition of dopamine, which influences the condensation and polymerization of glucose, matches better with ammonium salt decomposition. The SSA of porous carbon increases first and then decreases with the increasing amount of dopamine. In our case, the porous carbon produced with 5 wt% dopamine (PC-5) achieves the maximum SSA of up to 2593 m2/g. Accordingly, it also shows the greatest electrochemical performance. The PC-5 shows a capacitance of 96.7 F/g calculated from the discharge curve at 1 A/g. It also has a good capacitive rate capacity, the specific capacitance can still maintain 80%, even at a high current density of 10 A/g. Moreover, PC-5 exhibits a good cycling stability of 98.1% capacitive retention after 1000 cycles. The proposed method may show promising prospects for preparing porous carbon materials as advanced energy storage materials, storage, and catalyst supports. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Porous Carbon based 3D Architectures)
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Open AccessArticle Experimental Investigation on 3D Graphene-CNT Hybrid Foams with Different Interactions
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(9), 694; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8090694
Received: 18 August 2018 / Revised: 2 September 2018 / Accepted: 3 September 2018 / Published: 6 September 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2747 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Due to the exceptional properties of graphene, numerous possibilities for real applications in various fields have been provided. However, it is a challenge to fabricate bulk graphene materials with properties arising from the nature of individual graphene sheets, and which assemble into monolithic [...] Read more.
Due to the exceptional properties of graphene, numerous possibilities for real applications in various fields have been provided. However, it is a challenge to fabricate bulk graphene materials with properties arising from the nature of individual graphene sheets, and which assemble into monolithic three-dimensional structures. If 3D structured graphene foam were made instead of 2D structured graphene, it is expected that it would be a facile fabrication, with relatively low cost with the possibility of scale-up, and would maintain the intrinsic properties of graphene. To solve the weaknesses of 2D structured graphene, this study aimed to fabricate a 3D graphene-carbon nanotubes (CNT) hybrid foam. In this study, CNT was used to reinforce the graphene foams. In addition, two different surfactants, known as sodium dodecylbenzene sulphonate (SDBS) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), were applied to help CNT dispersion. The π–π interaction was induced by SDBS/CNT, while ionic interaction was derived from CTAB/CNT. To confirm the charge effect with different surfactants, SEM, Zeta-potential, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, and compression tests were performed. When using a cationic surfactant, CTAB, compressive modulus, and strength increased due to the formation of relatively strong ionic bonding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Porous Carbon based 3D Architectures)
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Open AccessArticle Preparation of Hierarchically Porous Graphitic Carbon Spheres and Their Applications in Supercapacitors and Dye Adsorption
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(8), 625; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8080625
Received: 23 July 2018 / Revised: 9 August 2018 / Accepted: 15 August 2018 / Published: 17 August 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5930 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Hierarchical micro-/mesoporous graphitic carbon spheres (HGCS) with a uniform diameter of ~0.35 μm were synthesized by Fe-catalyzed graphitization of amorphous carbon spheres resultant from hydrothermal carbonization. The HGCS resultant from 3 h at 900 °C with 1.0 wt % Fe catalyst had a [...] Read more.
Hierarchical micro-/mesoporous graphitic carbon spheres (HGCS) with a uniform diameter of ~0.35 μm were synthesized by Fe-catalyzed graphitization of amorphous carbon spheres resultant from hydrothermal carbonization. The HGCS resultant from 3 h at 900 °C with 1.0 wt % Fe catalyst had a high graphitization degree and surface area as high as 564 m2/g. They also exhibited high specific capacitance of 140 F/g at 0.2 A/g and good electrochemical stability with 94% capacitance retention after consecutive 2500 cycles. The graphitization degree of the HGCS contributed to 60% of their specific capacitance, and their specific capacitance per unit surface area was as high as 0.2 F/m2, which was much higher than in the most cases of porous amorphous carbon materials reported before. In addition, the HGCS showed a high adsorption capacity of 182.8 mg/g for methylene blue (MB), which was 12 times as high as that in the case of carbon spheres before graphitization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Porous Carbon based 3D Architectures)
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Open AccessArticle Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube Arrays with High Aspect Ratio via Ni-Catalyzed Pyrolysis of Waste Polyethylene
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(7), 556; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8070556
Received: 22 June 2018 / Revised: 16 July 2018 / Accepted: 18 July 2018 / Published: 21 July 2018
PDF Full-text (4199 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays 30–50 nm in diameter and with a length of several micrometers were prepared by catalytic pyrolysis of waste polyethylene in Ar at 773−1073 K using nickel dichloride as a catalyst precursor. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman [...] Read more.
Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays 30–50 nm in diameter and with a length of several micrometers were prepared by catalytic pyrolysis of waste polyethylene in Ar at 773−1073 K using nickel dichloride as a catalyst precursor. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectrometry (Raman), a vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM), and nitrogen adsorption/desorption were used to investigate the effects of the pyrolysis temperature and catalyst contents on the preparation of the aligned CNTs. As results, the as-obtained CNTs had an outer diameter of 30 nm, a wall thickness of 10 nm, and a length of about 50 μm, and their aspect ratio was high up to 1500. The aligned CNTs containing 0.75 wt% Ni prepared at 973 K exhibited good adsorption performance for methylene blue (MB); furthermore, benefiting from the special magnetic properties of residual Ni catalysts, the as-obtained CNTs could be easily magnetically recycled from the treated solution after adsorption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Porous Carbon based 3D Architectures)
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