Current Trends in Nanostructured Biosensors

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanofabrication and Nanomanufacturing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2023) | Viewed by 8779

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Director Doctoral School of Chemistry, University of Bucharest, 4-12 Regina Elisabeta Blvd., 030018 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: sensors and biosensors; analytical electrochemistry; nanostructured interfaces; bioanalytical chemistry; immobilization procedure of biomolecules
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnology plays an important role in producing impressive advances in the field of biosensors. The emergence of nanostructured materials has opened new horizons in the development of next-generation biosensors; being able to control the design of the electrode interface at the nanoscale combined with the intrinsic characteristics of the nanomaterials engenders novel biosensing platforms with improved capabilities. In recent years, biosensors devices made with different materials and working with different modes have attracted particular interest due to their multiple applications, from clinical labs, to food analysis, environmental applications, protein engineering, drug discovery, and security applications.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to bring into focus this important research area and advances of biosensors and, more specifically, those related to nanoscale dimensions of metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles, metal and carbon quantum dots, graphene, carbon nanotubes, nanowires, nanocomposites, nanoporous anodic alumina, mesoporous silica, porous silicon, and polystyrene nanochannels, that expand sensitivity and integrate several novel transduction principles such as enhanced electrochemical, optical, catalytic activity, and superparamagnetic properties.

Recent approaches to construct label-free nanostructured biosensors, including self-assembled peptide nanostructures as building blocks with a special focus on the development of point-of-care portable electronic devices for applications ranging from environmental analysis to biomedical diagnostics, are welcome.

This Special Issue aims at collecting both reviews and recent papers on this topic.

Prof. Dr. Camelia Bala
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • biosensors
  • materials
  • biomolecules
  • analytical electrochemistry
  • label-free nanostructured biosensors

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 1934 KiB  
Article
Cancer Marker Immunosensing through Surface-Enhanced Photoluminescence on Nanostructured Silver Substrates
by Georgia Geka, Anastasia Kanioura, Ioannis Kochylas, Vlassis Likodimos, Spiros Gardelis, Anastasios Dimitriou, Nikolaos Papanikolaou, Kalliopi Chatzantonaki, Ekaterina Charvalos, Anastasios Economou, Sotirios Kakabakos and Panagiota Petrou
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(24), 3099; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13243099 - 7 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1012
Abstract
Nanostructured noble metal surfaces enhance the photoluminescence emitted by fluorescent molecules, permitting the development of highly sensitive fluorescence immunoassays. To this end, surfaces with silicon nanowires decorated with silver nanoparticles in the form of dendrites or aggregates were evaluated as substrates for the [...] Read more.
Nanostructured noble metal surfaces enhance the photoluminescence emitted by fluorescent molecules, permitting the development of highly sensitive fluorescence immunoassays. To this end, surfaces with silicon nanowires decorated with silver nanoparticles in the form of dendrites or aggregates were evaluated as substrates for the immunochemical detection of two ovarian cancer indicators, carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) and human epididymis protein 4 (HE4). The substrates were prepared by metal-enhanced chemical etching of silicon wafers to create, in one step, silicon nanowires and silver nanoparticles on top of them. For both analytes, non-competitive immunoassays were developed using pairs of highly specific monoclonal antibodies, one for analyte capture on the substrate and the other for detection. In order to facilitate the identification of the immunocomplexes through a reaction with streptavidin labeled with Rhodamine Red-X, the detection antibodies were biotinylated. An in-house-developed optical set-up was used for photoluminescence signal measurements after assay completion. The detection limits achieved were 2.5 U/mL and 3.12 pM for CA125 and HE4, respectively, with linear dynamic ranges extending up to 500 U/mL for CA125 and up to 500 pM for HE4, covering the concentration ranges of both healthy and ovarian cancer patients. Thus, the proposed method could be implemented for the early diagnosis and/or prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Trends in Nanostructured Biosensors)
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15 pages, 4916 KiB  
Article
SBA-Pr-Is-TAP Functionalized Nanostructured Silica as a Highly Selective Fluorescent Chemosensor for Fe3+ and Cr2O72− Ions in Aqueous Media
by Ghodsi Mohammadi Ziarani, Maryam Akhgar, Fatemeh Mohajer, Alireza Badiei and Rafael Luque
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(10), 2533; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11102533 - 28 Sep 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2760
Abstract
SBA-Pr-Is-TAP was synthesized via functionalization of SBA-15. The synthesized hybrid nanomaterial was characterized by various techniques including FT-IR, TGA, XRD, SEM, and BET. SBA-Pr-Is-TAP could precisely bind Fe3+ and Cr2O72− ions among a range of different species in [...] Read more.
SBA-Pr-Is-TAP was synthesized via functionalization of SBA-15. The synthesized hybrid nanomaterial was characterized by various techniques including FT-IR, TGA, XRD, SEM, and BET. SBA-Pr-Is-TAP could precisely bind Fe3+ and Cr2O72− ions among a range of different species in aqueous media, consequently acting as a nanoporous chemosensor of Fe3+ and Cr2O72− ions. An excellent linear relation was observed between the nanoporous chemosensor and ion concentrations, with acceptable detection limits of 2.43 × 10−6 M and 3.96 × 10−7 M for Fe3+ and Cr2O72− ions respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Trends in Nanostructured Biosensors)
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Review

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20 pages, 2030 KiB  
Review
Nucleic Acid-Based Nanobiosensor (NAB) Used for Salmonella Detection in Foods: A Systematic Review
by Leticia Tessaro, Adriano Aquino, Paloma de Almeida Rodrigues, Nirav Joshi, Rafaela Gomes Ferrari and Carlos Adam Conte-Junior
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(5), 821; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12050821 - 28 Feb 2022
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 4169
Abstract
Salmonella bacteria is a foodborne pathogen found mainly in food products causing severe symptoms in the individual, such as diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps after consuming the infected food, which can be fatal in some severe cases. Rapid and selective methods to detect [...] Read more.
Salmonella bacteria is a foodborne pathogen found mainly in food products causing severe symptoms in the individual, such as diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps after consuming the infected food, which can be fatal in some severe cases. Rapid and selective methods to detect Salmonella bacteria can prevent outbreaks when ingesting contaminated food. Nanobiosensors are a highly sensitive, simple, faster, and lower cost method for the rapid detection of Salmonella, an alternative to conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. This study systematically searched and analyzed literature data related to nucleic acid-based nanobiosensors (NABs) with nanomaterials to detect Salmonella in food, retrieved from three databases, published between 2010 and 2021. We extracted data and critically analyzed the effect of nanomaterial functionalized with aptamer or DNA at the limit of detection (LOD). Among the nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were the most used nanomaterial in studies due to their unique optical properties of the metal, followed by magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) of Fe3O4, copper nanoparticles (CuNPs), and also hybrid nanomaterials multiwalled carbon nanotubes (c-MWCNT/AuNP), QD/UCNP-MB (quantum dotes upconverting nanoparticle of magnetic beads), and cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs@MNPs) showed excellent LOD values. The transducers used for detection also varied from electrochemical, fluorescent, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), RAMAN spectroscopy, and mainly colorimetric due to the possibility of visualizing the detection result with the naked eye. Furthermore, we show the magnetic separation system capable of detecting the target amplification of the genetic material. Finally, we present perspectives, future research, and opportunities to use point-of-care (POC) diagnostic devices as a faster and lower cost approach for detecting Salmonella in food as they prove to be viable for resource-constrained environments such as field-based or economically limited conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Trends in Nanostructured Biosensors)
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