Special Issue "Nanoparticles for Electrocatalysts"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Richard Haverkamp
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Massey University Manawatu, Palmerston North, New Zealand
Interests: electrocatalysts; nanoparticles; synchrotron techniques; collagen materials; surface reactions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is focussed on the contribution of nanoparticle systems to electrocatalytic processes. Electrocatalysts speed up or alter the selectivity of oxidation or reduction reactions. There are many important applications, especially in the field of carbon-free energy technologies, such a hydrogen production, including both the hydrogen evolution reaction and the oxygen evolution reaction. It also includes fuel cells where nanoparticle electrocatalysts are important at the reaction interfaces. Electrocatalysts are also useful for emerging organic synthesis reactions and pollution mitigation processes and in the recent field of electrochemical CO2 capture. In all these areas, nanoparticle electrocatalyst systems can make an important contribution to the field.

It is our pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript to this Special Issue. Full papers, short communications, and reviews are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Richard Haverkamp
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Electrocatalysts
  • Nanoparticles
  • Hydrogen electrolysis
  • Fuel cells
  • Electrosynthesis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Beyond Nitrogen in the Oxygen Reduction Reaction on Nitrogen-Doped Carbons: A NEXAFS Investigation
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(5), 1198; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11051198 - 01 May 2021
Viewed by 204
Abstract
Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells require cheap and active electrocatalysts to drive the oxygen reduction reaction. Nitrogen-doped carbons have been extensively studied regarding their oxygen reduction reaction. The work at hand looks beyond the nitrogen chemistry and brings to light the role of [...] Read more.
Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells require cheap and active electrocatalysts to drive the oxygen reduction reaction. Nitrogen-doped carbons have been extensively studied regarding their oxygen reduction reaction. The work at hand looks beyond the nitrogen chemistry and brings to light the role of oxygen. Nitrogen-doped nanocarbons were obtained by a radio-frequency plasma route at 0, 100, 250, and 350 W. The lateral size of the graphitic domain, determined from Raman spectroscopy, showed that the nitrogen plasma treatment decreased the crystallite size. Synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy showed a similar nitrogen chemistry, albeit the nitrogen concentration increased with the plasma power. Lateral crystallite size and several nitrogen moieties were plotted against the onset potential determined from oxygen reduction reaction curves. There was no correlation between the electrochemical activity and the sample structure, as determine from Raman and synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) was performed to unravel the carbon and nitrogen local structure. A difference analysis of the NEXAFS spectra showed that the oxygen surrounding the pyridinic nitrogen was critical in achieving high onset potentials. The work shows that there were more factors at play, other than carbon organization and nitrogen chemistry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles for Electrocatalysts)
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Open AccessArticle
Enhancement of Catalytic Activity and Durability of Pt Nanoparticle through Strong Chemical Interaction with Electrically Conductive Support of Magnéli Phase Titanium Oxide
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(4), 829; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11040829 - 24 Mar 2021
Viewed by 360
Abstract
In this study, we address the catalytic performance of variously sized Pt nanoparticles (NPs) (from 1.7 to 2.9 nm) supported on magnéli phase titanium oxide (MPTO, Ti4O7) along with commercial solid type carbon (VXC-72R) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). [...] Read more.
In this study, we address the catalytic performance of variously sized Pt nanoparticles (NPs) (from 1.7 to 2.9 nm) supported on magnéli phase titanium oxide (MPTO, Ti4O7) along with commercial solid type carbon (VXC-72R) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Key idea is to utilize a robust and electrically conductive MPTO as a support material so that we employed it to improve the catalytic activity and durability through the strong metal-support interaction (SMSI). Furthermore, we increase the specific surface area of MPTO up to 61.6 m2 g−1 to enhance the SMSI effect between Pt NP and MPTO. After the deposition of a range of Pt NPs on the support materials, we investigate the ORR activity and durability using a rotating disk electrode (RDE) technique in acid media. As a result of accelerated stress test (AST) for 30k cycles, regardless of the Pt particle size, we confirmed that Pt/MPTO samples show a lower electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss (<20%) than that of Pt/C (~40%). That is explained by the increased dissolution potential and binding energy of Pt on MPTO against to carbon, which is supported by the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Based on these results, we found that conductive metal oxides could be an alternative as a support material for the long-term fuel cell operation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles for Electrocatalysts)
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