Special Issue "Nanomaterials for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Kazuteru Nonomura
Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Photomolecular Science, Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Chemin des Alambics, Station 6, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
Interests: dye-sensitized solar cells; perovskite solar cells; electrochemistry; electrochemical deposition; photoelectrochemistry; screen-printing; ink-jet printing; spin coating; thermal evaporation; spray-pyrolysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The variety of materials and the advantageous properties in terms of both economic and environmental friendliness are the greatest strengths of dye-sensitized solar cells. At each component in the device, choice of materials depends on the aim: dyes, mesoporous semiconductors, redox mediators, and counter electrode materials. Each material and molecule has unique properties, such as energy conversion, light absorption property, stability, adsorption, impact on the environment, charge transfer, and preparation processes. Each component interacts with the others to make the device properties. The development of materials and molecules for dye-sensitized solar cells is the key to improving the uniqueness of dye-sensitized solar cells.

This Special Issue addresses nanomaterials for dye-sensitized solar cells. I invite the community to support Nanomaterials in this initiative by submitting papers with the state-of-the-art materials and molecules for dye-sensitized solar cells, new preparation methods for the fabrication of devices and/or materials, and characterization methods. Your contribution helps the community to see a future direction of the research in dye-sensitized solar cells.

Dr. Kazuteru Nonomura
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dye molecules
  • Mesoporous semiconductor
  • Blocking layer
  • Adsorption of dye molecules
  • Redox mediator
  • Counter electrode
  • Flexible substrate
  • Low-temperature process
  • Charge transfer analysis/loss mechanism
  • Solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells
  • P-type dye-sensitized solar cells

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Defective States in Micro-Crystalline CsPbBr3 and Their Role on Photoconductivity
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(2), 177; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9020177 - 01 Feb 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Intrinsic defects in CsPbBr3 microcrystalline films have been studied using thermally stimulated current (TSC) technique in a wide temperature range (100–400 K). Below room temperature, TSC emission is composed by a set of several energy levels, in the range 0.11–0.27 eV, suggesting [...] Read more.
Intrinsic defects in CsPbBr3 microcrystalline films have been studied using thermally stimulated current (TSC) technique in a wide temperature range (100–400 K). Below room temperature, TSC emission is composed by a set of several energy levels, in the range 0.11–0.27 eV, suggesting a quasi-continuum distribution of states with almost constant density. Above room temperature, up to 400 K, the temperature range of interest for solar cells, both dark current and photocurrent, are mainly dominated by energy levels in the range 0.40–0.45 eV. Even if measured trap densities are high, in the range 1013–1016 cm−3, the very small capture cross-sections, about 10−26 m2, agree with the high defect tolerance characterizing this material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells)
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Open AccessArticle
Significant Influence of a Single Atom Change in Auxiliary Acceptor on Photovoltaic Properties of Porphyrin-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(12), 1030; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8121030 - 11 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
The rational design of porphyrin sensitizers is always crucial for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), since the change of only a single atom can have a significant influence on the photovoltaic performance. We incorporated the pyridothiadiazole group, as a stronger electron-withdrawing group, into the [...] Read more.
The rational design of porphyrin sensitizers is always crucial for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), since the change of only a single atom can have a significant influence on the photovoltaic performance. We incorporated the pyridothiadiazole group, as a stronger electron-withdrawing group, into the commonly well-established skeleton of D-porphyrin-triple bond-acceptor sensitizers by a single atom change for a well-known strong electron-withdrawing benzothiadiazole (BTD) unit as an auxiliary acceptor. The impact of the pyridothiadiazole group on the optical; electrochemical; and photovoltaic properties of D–π–A porphyrin sensitizers was investigated with comparison for a benzothiadiazole-substituted SGT-020 porphyrin. The pyridothiadiazole-substituted SGT-024 porphyrin dye was red-shifted so that the absorption range might be expected to achieve higher light harvest efficiency (LHE) than the SGT-020 porphyrin. However, all the devices were fabricated by utilizing SGT-020 and SGT-024, evaluated and found to achieve a cell efficiency of 10.3% for SGT-020-based DSSC but 4.2% for SGT-024-based DSSC under standard global AM 1.5G solar light conditions. The main reason is the lower charge collection efficiency of SGT-024-based DSSC than SGT-020-based DSSC, which can be attributed to the tilted dye adsorption mode on the TiO2 photoanode. This may allow for faster charge recombination, which eventually leads to lower Jsc, Voc and power conversion efficiency (PCE). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells)
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