Special Issue "Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in the Nano-World"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 August 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Gediminas Niaura

Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Sauletekio Ave 3, LT-10257 Vilnius, Lithuania
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Raman spectroscopy; surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy; SHINERS; spectroelectrochemistry; biospectroscopy; self-assembled monolayers; conducting polymers; molecular electrochemistry; bioelectrochemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of nanomaterials for science, industry and biomedicine requires a molecular-level understanding of interfacial properties; in particular the structure, orientation, interactions, and function of adsorbed (bio)molecules. Such an understanding enables the prediction and discovery of new interfacial effects and allows for their control. This is a challenging task, as techniques suitable for such studies must be both surface sensitive and molecular structure specific. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an intrinsically nanostructure-based surface vibrational spectroscopy born at the electrochemical interface in 1974. The recent development of the technique is associated with tremendous progress in the construction and control of the physico-chemical properties of nanomaterials and has enabled the emergence of new types of plasmon-enhanced methods, including tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS).

This Special Issue focuses on the molecular-level characterization of nanomaterials using the SERS, TERS, and SHINERS approaches. These techniques are able to provide unique atomistic information on the architecture and function of molecules at surfaces including metal–adsorbate bonding, the orientation of specific molecular groups, chemical reactions at the interface, the secondary structure of biomolecules, interfacial recognition events, and the effects of electrochemical potential on the interface structure. We invite authors to contribute research articles or reviews of the recent progress in understanding the molecular structure and function of nanomaterials based on SERS analysis. Manuscripts devoted to understanding the biomolecule–nanomaterial interface are especially welcome.


Dr. Gediminas Niaura
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • SERS structure and function markers
  • Metal–adsorbate bonding
  • Graphene-family nanomaterials
  • Magnetic nanoparticles
  • 2D materials
  • Self-assembled monolayers
  • Nanoscale chemical analysis
  • SERS
  • TERS
  • SHINERS
  • Vibrations in nanomaterials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Highly Sensitive and Selective Nanogap-Enhanced SERS Sensing Platform
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(4), 619; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9040619
Received: 17 March 2019 / Revised: 11 April 2019 / Accepted: 11 April 2019 / Published: 16 April 2019
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Abstract
This paper reports a highly sensitive and selective surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensing platform. We used a simple fabrication method to generate plasmonic hotspots through a direct maskless plasma etching of a polymer surface and the surface tension-driven assembly of high aspect ratio [...] Read more.
This paper reports a highly sensitive and selective surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensing platform. We used a simple fabrication method to generate plasmonic hotspots through a direct maskless plasma etching of a polymer surface and the surface tension-driven assembly of high aspect ratio Ag/polymer nanopillars. These collapsed plasmonic nanopillars produced an enhanced near-field interaction via coupled localized surface plasmon resonance. The high density of the small nanogaps yielded a high plasmonic detection performance, with an average SERS enhancement factor of 1.5 × 107. More importantly, we demonstrated that the encapsulation of plasmonic nanostructures within nanofiltration membranes allowed the selective filtration of small molecules based on the degree of membrane swelling in organic solvents and molecular size. Nanofiltration membrane-encapsulated SERS substrates do not require pretreatments. Therefore, they provide a simple and fast detection of toxic molecules using portable Raman spectroscopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in the Nano-World)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Immobilization and 3D Hot-Junction Formation of Gold Nanoparticles on Two-Dimensional Silicate Nanoplatelets as Substrates for High-Efficiency Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Detection
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(3), 324; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9030324
Received: 12 January 2019 / Revised: 19 February 2019 / Accepted: 20 February 2019 / Published: 1 March 2019
PDF Full-text (2576 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We synthesize a high-efficiency substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements, which is composed of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on two-dimensional silicate nanoplatelets acting as an inorganic stabilizer, via the in-situ reduction of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (III) by sodium citrate in an aqueous solution. Silicate [...] Read more.
We synthesize a high-efficiency substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements, which is composed of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on two-dimensional silicate nanoplatelets acting as an inorganic stabilizer, via the in-situ reduction of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (III) by sodium citrate in an aqueous solution. Silicate platelets of ~1-nm thickness and various sizes, viz. laponite (50 nm), sodium montmorillonite (Na+–MMT, 100 nm), and mica (500 nm), are used to stabilize the AuNPs ([email protected]), which are formed with uniform diameters ranging between 25 and 30 nm as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In particular, the laponite SERS substrate can be used in biological, environmental, and food safety applications to measure small molecules such as DNA (adenine molecule), dye (Direct Blue), and herbicide (paraquat) as it shows high detection sensitivity with a detection limit of 10−9 M for adenine detection. These highly sensitive SERS substrates, with their three-dimensional hot-junctions formed with AuNPs and two-dimensional silicate nanoplatelets, allow the highly efficient detection of organic molecules. Therefore, these [email protected] nanohybrid substrates have great potential in biosensor technology because of their environmentally-friendly and simple fabrication process, high efficiency, and the possibility of rapid detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in the Nano-World)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Investigation of the Microstructures of Graphene Quantum Dots (GQDs) by Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(10), 864; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8100864
Received: 21 September 2018 / Revised: 17 October 2018 / Accepted: 19 October 2018 / Published: 22 October 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1826 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Photoluminescence (PL) is the most significant feature of graphene quantum dots (GQDs). However, the PL mechanism in GQDs has been debated due to the fact that the microstructures, such as edge and in-plane defects that are critical for PL emission, have not been [...] Read more.
Photoluminescence (PL) is the most significant feature of graphene quantum dots (GQDs). However, the PL mechanism in GQDs has been debated due to the fact that the microstructures, such as edge and in-plane defects that are critical for PL emission, have not been convincingly identified due to the lack of effective detection methods. Conventional measures such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy only show some localized lattice fringes of GQDs and the structures of some substituents, which have little significance in terms of thoroughly understanding the PL effect. Here, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was introduced as a highly sensitive surface technique to study the microstructures of GQDs. Pure GQDs were prepared by laser ablating and cutting highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) parallel to the graphite layers. Consequently, abundant SERS signals of the GQDs were obtained on an Ag electrode in an electrochemical environment for the first time. The results convincingly and experimentally characterized the typical and detailed features of GQDs, such as the crystallinity of sp2 hexagons, the quantum confinement effect, various defects on the edges, sp3-like defects and disorders on the basal planes, and passivated structures on the periphery and surface of the GQDs. This work demonstrates that SERS is thus by far the most effective technique for probing the microstructures of GQDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in the Nano-World)
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Graphical abstract

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