Special Issue "Microscopy of nanomaterials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (21 March 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Bogdan Stefan Vasile
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Research Center for Micro and Nanomaterials, Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Bucharest, 011061, Romania
Interests: binders materials science; cement physical and chemical characterization techniques; end-of-life materials; waste management; high-resolution transmission electron microscopy; analytical TEM (EELS, EDX)
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Because electron microscopy is a high-end technique to characterize nanomaterials, I believe that special attention must be taken in this field. Both high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, as well as any microscopy technique (such as AFM, correlative microscopy, light microscopy, super resolution imaging, etc.), are indispensable techniques for characterising nanomaterials, either in the life science field or in the materials science field. The main objective of this Special Issue is to extend the knowledge and highlight the importance of microscopy techniques in developing and characterising various nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanowires, and thin films, and their interactions with different materials. The domains in which microscopy techniques will be used are both in life and materials science with applications from biomedical devices, drug delivery systems, medical imaging to multiferoic materials, high-energy batteries, capacitors, superconductors, and aerospace components. The main point to keep in mind for this Special Issue of Nanomaterials is that it will attempt to cover the usage of microscopy techniques as the main tool to investigate recent advances in the synthesis, processing, and application of nanostructured materials.

Dr. Bogdan Stefan Vasile
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Life science microscopy
  • Interactions in living tissues and cells
  • Super-resolution and light microscopy
  • Applications of the AFM and related techniques of organic and biological compounds on different substrates
  • Exploring 3D microscopy in cells and tissue imaging
  • Correlative microscopy of biological samples: fluorescence imaging, electron microscopy, cryo-EM, volume EM, micro-CT, soft X-ray, AFM, etc.
  • Biomolecular labelling
  • Volume Scanning Electron Microscopy
  • Cryo-Electron Tomography
  • Image processing in Electron Microscopy
  • Materials Science Microscopy
  • Electron Microscopy of 1D and 2D materials
  • Microscopy in Industrial Applications
  • Phase Microscopy
  • Spectroscopy in Electron Microscopy
  • Electron diffraction and structural analysis
  • In situ TEM and high-resolution TEM
  • Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy
  • Analytical STEM
  • Applications of the AFM and related techniques in materials science. This includes also PFM, MFM, and STM
  • Electron tomography

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Powder Nano-Beam Diffraction in Scanning Electron Microscope: Fast and Simple Method for Analysis of Nanoparticle Crystal Structure
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(4), 962; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11040962 - 09 Apr 2021
Viewed by 870
Abstract
We introduce a novel scanning electron microscopy (SEM) method which yields powder electron diffraction patterns. The only requirement is that the SEM microscope must be equipped with a pixelated detector of transmitted electrons. The pixelated detectors for SEM have been commercialized recently. They [...] Read more.
We introduce a novel scanning electron microscopy (SEM) method which yields powder electron diffraction patterns. The only requirement is that the SEM microscope must be equipped with a pixelated detector of transmitted electrons. The pixelated detectors for SEM have been commercialized recently. They can be used routinely to collect a high number of electron diffraction patterns from individual nanocrystals and/or locations (this is called four-dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy (4D-STEM), as we obtain two-dimensional (2D) information for each pixel of the 2D scanning array). Nevertheless, the individual 4D-STEM diffractograms are difficult to analyze due to the random orientation of nanocrystalline material. In our method, all individual diffractograms (showing randomly oriented diffraction spots from a few nanocrystals) are combined into one composite diffraction pattern (showing diffraction rings typical of polycrystalline/powder materials). The final powder diffraction pattern can be analyzed by means of standard programs for TEM/SAED (Selected-Area Electron Diffraction). We called our new method 4D-STEM/PNBD (Powder NanoBeam Diffraction) and applied it to three different systems: Au nano-islands (well diffracting nanocrystals with size ~20 nm), small TbF3 nanocrystals (size < 5 nm), and large NaYF4 nanocrystals (size > 100 nm). In all three cases, the STEM/PNBD results were comparable to those obtained from TEM/SAED. Therefore, the 4D-STEM/PNBD method enables fast and simple analysis of nanocrystalline materials, which opens quite new possibilities in the field of SEM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microscopy of nanomaterials)
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Article
Sulpho-Salicylic Acid Grafted to Ferrite Nanoparticles for n-Type Organic Semiconductors
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(9), 1787; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10091787 - 09 Sep 2020
Viewed by 665
Abstract
A disadvantage of the use of pentacene and typical organic materials in electronics is that their precursors are toxic for manufacturers and the environment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an n-type non-toxic semiconductor for organic transistors [...] Read more.
A disadvantage of the use of pentacene and typical organic materials in electronics is that their precursors are toxic for manufacturers and the environment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an n-type non-toxic semiconductor for organic transistors that uses sulpho-salicylic acid—a stable, electron-donating compound with reduced toxicity—grafted on a ferrite core–shell and a green synthesis method. The micro-physical characterization indicated a good dispersion stability and homogeneity of the obtained nanofilms using the dip-coating technique. The in-situ electrical characterization was based on a point-contact transistor configuration, and the increase in the drain current as the positive gate voltage increased proved the functionality of the n-type semiconductor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microscopy of nanomaterials)
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