Special Issue "Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials and Their Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Synthesis, Interfaces and Nanostructures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Maria E. Davila
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Materials Science of Madrid- CSIC- C/ Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, 3- 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid, Spain
Interests: low dimensional nanomaterials; quantum materials; spectroscopies; microscopies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Nanomaterials aims to present various topics centered on “Low Dimensional Nanomaterials and Their Applications”.

Different types will be considered, from zero-dimensional (0D) moieties, e.g., clusters, quantum dots, and nanoparticles, to one-dimensional (1D) species, e.g., nanotubes, nanowires, nanoribbons, and two-dimensional (2D) structures, e.g., nanosheets and nanowalls. This issue will include quantum materials and emerging phenomena, synthesis and growth, characterization, theoretical simulations. Potential applications in the fields of nanoelectronics, photonics and optoelectronics (photodetectors, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and lasers), sensors (chemical, gas, biological, magnetic, and strain), and energy storage and conversion (supercapacitors, solar cells, thermoelectric devices and fuel cells) will be highlighted, as well as biomedical applications.

Both original research and review papers are welcome for possible publication.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Nanomaterials growth and synthesis;
  • Characterization: Microscopies, spectroscopies, and others;
  • Theory and simulation;
  • Quantum materials and emerging phenomena;
  • Physics, chemistry, and biological studies;
  • Novel applications;
  • Nanofabrication and devices.

Dr. Maria E. Davila
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • zero-dimensional (0D)
  • one-dimensional (1D)
  • two-dimensional (2D)
  • clusters
  • quantum dots
  • nanoparticles
  • nanotubes
  • nanowires
  • nanoribbons
  • quantum materials
  • theoretical simulations

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Measurement of Nanometre-Scale Gate Oxide Thicknesses by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy in a Scanning Electron Microscope Combined with Monte Carlo Simulations
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(8), 2117; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11082117 - 20 Aug 2021
Viewed by 519
Abstract
A procedure based on energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in a scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDXS) is proposed to measure ultra-thin oxide layer thicknesses to atomic scale precision in top-down instead of cross-sectional geometry. The approach is based on modelling the variation of the electron beam [...] Read more.
A procedure based on energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in a scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDXS) is proposed to measure ultra-thin oxide layer thicknesses to atomic scale precision in top-down instead of cross-sectional geometry. The approach is based on modelling the variation of the electron beam penetration depth and hence the depth of X-ray generation in the sample as a function of the acceleration voltage. This has been tested for the simple case of silica on silicon (SiO2/Si) which can serve as a model system to study gate oxides in metal-on-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOS-FETs). Two possible implementations exist both of which rely on pairs of measurements to be made: in method A, the wafer piece of interest and a reference sample (here: ultra-clean fused quartz glass for calibration of the effective k-factors of X-ray lines from elements O and Si) are analysed at the same acceleration voltage. In method B, two measurements of the apparent O/Si ratio of the same wafer sample need to be made at different acceleration voltages and from their comparison to simulations the SiO2 layer thickness of the sample can be inferred. The precision attainable is ultimately shown to be limited by surface contamination during the experiments, as very thin carbonaceous surface layers can alter the results at very low acceleration voltages, while the sensitivity to ultra-thin surface oxides is much reduced at higher acceleration voltages. The optimal operation voltage is estimated to lie in the range of 3–15 kV. Method A has been experimentally verified to work well for test structures of thin oxides on Si-Ge/Si. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials and Their Applications)
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Article
Approaching Disordered Quantum Dot Systems by Complex Networks with Spatial and Physical-Based Constraints
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(8), 2056; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11082056 - 12 Aug 2021
Viewed by 537
Abstract
This paper focuses on modeling a disordered system of quantum dots (QDs) by using complex networks with spatial and physical-based constraints. The first constraint is that, although QDs (=nodes) are randomly distributed in a metric space, they have to fulfill the condition that [...] Read more.
This paper focuses on modeling a disordered system of quantum dots (QDs) by using complex networks with spatial and physical-based constraints. The first constraint is that, although QDs (=nodes) are randomly distributed in a metric space, they have to fulfill the condition that there is a minimum inter-dot distance that cannot be violated (to minimize electron localization). The second constraint arises from our process of weighted link formation, which is consistent with the laws of quantum physics and statistics: it not only takes into account the overlap integrals but also Boltzmann factors to include the fact that an electron can hop from one QD to another with a different energy level. Boltzmann factors and coherence naturally arise from the Lindblad master equation. The weighted adjacency matrix leads to a Laplacian matrix and a time evolution operator that allows the computation of the electron probability distribution and quantum transport efficiency. The results suggest that there is an optimal inter-dot distance that helps reduce electron localization in QD clusters and make the wave function better extended. As a potential application, we provide recommendations for improving QD intermediate-band solar cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials and Their Applications)
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Article
Hybrid Films Based on Bilayer Graphene and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Simulation of Atomic Structure and Study of Electrically Conductive Properties
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(8), 1934; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11081934 - 27 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 698
Abstract
One of the urgent problems of materials science is the search for the optimal combination of graphene modifications and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the formation of layered hybrid material with specified physical properties. High electrical conductivity and stability are one of the main [...] Read more.
One of the urgent problems of materials science is the search for the optimal combination of graphene modifications and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the formation of layered hybrid material with specified physical properties. High electrical conductivity and stability are one of the main optimality criteria for a graphene/CNT hybrid structure. This paper presents results of a theoretical and computational study of the peculiarities of the atomic structure and the regularities of current flow in hybrid films based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a diameter of 1.2 nm and bilayer zigzag graphene nanoribbons, where the layers are shifted relative to the other. It is found that the maximum stresses on atoms of hybrid film do not exceed ~0.46 GPa for all considered topological models. It is shown that the electrical conductivity anisotropy takes place in graphene/SWCNT hybrid films at a graphene nanoribbon width of 4 hexagons. In the direction along the extended edge of the graphene nanoribbon, the electrical resistance of graphene/SWCNT hybrid film reaches ~125 kOhm; in the direction along the nanotube axis, the electrical resistance is about 16 kOhm. The prospects for the use of graphene/SWCNT hybrid films in electronics are predicted based on the obtained results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials and Their Applications)
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Article
Low-Thermal-Budget Photonic Sintering of Hybrid Pastes Containing Submicron/Nano CuO/Cu2O Particles
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(7), 1864; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11071864 - 20 Jul 2021
Viewed by 682
Abstract
Copper oxide particles of various sizes and constituent phases were used to form conductive circuits by means of photonic sintering. With the assistance of extremely low-energy-density xenon flash pulses (1.34 J/cm2), a mixture of nano/submicron copper oxide particles can be reduced [...] Read more.
Copper oxide particles of various sizes and constituent phases were used to form conductive circuits by means of photonic sintering. With the assistance of extremely low-energy-density xenon flash pulses (1.34 J/cm2), a mixture of nano/submicron copper oxide particles can be reduced in several seconds to form electrical conductive copper films or circuits exhibiting an average thickness of 6 μm without damaging the underlying polymeric substrate, which is quite unique compared to commercial nano-CuO inks whose sintered structure is usually 1 μm or less. A mixture of submicron/nano copper oxide particles with a weight ratio of 3:1 and increasing the fraction of Cu2O in the copper oxide both decrease the electrical resistivity of the reduced copper. Adding copper formate further improved the continuity of interconnects and, thereby, the electrical conductance. Exposure to three-pulse low-energy-density flashes yields an electrical resistivity of 64.6 μΩ·cm. This study not only shed the possibility to use heat-vulnerate polymers as substrate materials benefiting from extremely low-energy light sources, but also achieved photonic-sintered thick copper films through the adoption of submicron copper oxide particles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials and Their Applications)
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Article
Morphology-Controlled Vapor Phase Growth and Characterization of One-Dimensional GaTe Nanowires and Two-Dimensional Nanosheets for Potential Visible-Light Active Photocatalysts
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(3), 778; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11030778 - 18 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 668
Abstract
Gallium telluride (GaTe) one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) materials have drawn much attention for high-performance optoelectronic applications because it possesses a direct bandgap for all thickness. We report the morphology-controlled vapor phase growth of 1D GaTe nanowires and 2D GaTe nanosheets by a [...] Read more.
Gallium telluride (GaTe) one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) materials have drawn much attention for high-performance optoelectronic applications because it possesses a direct bandgap for all thickness. We report the morphology-controlled vapor phase growth of 1D GaTe nanowires and 2D GaTe nanosheets by a simple physical vapor transport (PVT) approach. The surface morphology, crystal structure, phonon vibration modes, and optical property of samples were characterized and studied. The growth temperature is a key synthetic factor to control sample morphology. The 1D GaTe single crystal monoclinic nanowires were synthesized at 550 °C. The strong interlayer interaction and high surface migration of adatoms on c-sapphire enable the assembly of 1D nanowires into 2D nanosheet under 600 °C. Based on the characterization results demonstrated, we propose the van der Waals growth mechanism of 1D nanowires and 2D nanosheets. Moreover, the visible-light photocatalytic activity of 1D nanowires and 2D nanosheets was examined. Both 1D and 2D GaTe nanostructures exhibit visible-light active photocatalytic activity, suggesting that the GaTe nanostructures may be promising materials for visible light photocatalytic applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials and Their Applications)
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