Special Issue "Nanostructured Gas Sensors Synthesis and Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanoelectronics, Nanosensors and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Noushin Nasiri
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
NanoTech Laboratory, School of Engineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
Interests: Nanotechnology; Nanomaterials; Nanofabrication; Gas Sensors; Photodetectors; Chemical Sensors; Functionalized Coatings; Wearable Technologies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gas sensors are used in a wide variety of applications for a diverse range of industries from agriculture to health, safety, security, and environmental monitoring. However, the performance of such sensors is significantly influenced by the morphology and structure of the sensing materials, resulting in a great obstacle for gas sensors based on bulk materials or dense films to achieve highly sensitive properties. A wide variety of nanostructured devices have been developed to improve the gas sensing properties, such as sensitivity, selectivity, stability, and response speed.

This Special Issue will attempt to cover the recent advances in the design and fabrication of nanostructured gas sensors, focusing on the nano-dimensional design of current state-of-the-art gas sensors, which have achieved records in selectivity, specificity, and sensitivity. We will highlight the methods of fabrication for these devices and relate their nano-dimensional materials to their record performance to provide a pathway for the gas sensors that will follow. The different types of nanostructured gas sensors, including catalytic, electrochemical, thermal conductivity, and optical gas sensors will be discussed together with their gas sensing mechanisms and potential applications.

Dr. Noushin Nasiri
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanostructured devices
  • gas sensors
  • nanomaterials
  • nanofabrication
  • sensitivity
  • selectivity
  • nano-synthesis
  • sensing mechanism

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Effect of Pd/ZnO Morphology on Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Response
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(10), 2598; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11102598 - 02 Oct 2021
Viewed by 218
Abstract
Laser deposition was used to obtain Pd/ZnO bilayers, which were used as sensing layers in surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors. The effect of laser deposition parameters such as deposition pressure, laser energy per pulse, laser wavelength or pulse duration on the porosity of [...] Read more.
Laser deposition was used to obtain Pd/ZnO bilayers, which were used as sensing layers in surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors. The effect of laser deposition parameters such as deposition pressure, laser energy per pulse, laser wavelength or pulse duration on the porosity of the Pd and ZnO films used in the sensors was studied. The effect of the morphology of the Pd and ZnO components on the sensor response to hydrogen was assessed. Deposition conditions producing more porous films lead to a larger sensor response. The morphology of the ZnO component of the bilayer is decisive and has an influence on the sensor properties in the same order of magnitude as the use of a bilayer instead of a single Pd or ZnO layer. The effect of the Pd film morphology is considerably smaller than that of ZnO, probably due to its smaller thickness. This has implications in other bilayer material combinations used in such sensors and for other types of analytes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Gas Sensors Synthesis and Applications)
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Article
Enhanced High-Temperature (600 °C) NO2 Response of ZnFe2O4 Nanoparticle-Based Exhaust Gas Sensors
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(11), 2133; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10112133 - 27 Oct 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 736
Abstract
Fabrication of gas sensors to monitor toxic exhaust gases at high working temperatures is a challenging task due to the low sensitivity and narrow long-term stability of the devices under harsh conditions. Herein, the fabrication of a chemiresistor-type gas sensor is reported for [...] Read more.
Fabrication of gas sensors to monitor toxic exhaust gases at high working temperatures is a challenging task due to the low sensitivity and narrow long-term stability of the devices under harsh conditions. Herein, the fabrication of a chemiresistor-type gas sensor is reported for the detection of NO2 gas at 600 °C. The sensing element consists of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles prepared via a high-energy ball milling and annealed at different temperatures (600–1000 °C). The effects of annealing temperature on the crystal structure, morphology, and gas sensing properties of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles are studied. A mixed spinel structure of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles with a lattice parameter of 8.445 Å is revealed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystallite size and X-ray density of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles increase with the annealing temperature, whereas the lattice parameter and volume are considerably reduced indicating lattice distortion and defects such as oxygen vacancies. ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles annealed at 1000 °C exhibit the highest sensitivity (0.13% ppm–1), sharp response (τres = 195 s), recovery (τrec = 17 s), and linear response to 100–400 ppm NO2 gas. The annealing temperature and oxygen vacancies play a major role in determining the sensitivity of devices. The plausible sensing mechanism is discussed. ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles show great potential for high-temperature exhaust gas sensing applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Gas Sensors Synthesis and Applications)
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Article
Effect of the Morphology and Electrical Property of Metal-Deposited ZnO Nanostructures on CO Gas Sensitivity
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(11), 2124; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10112124 - 27 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 648
Abstract
The development of a highly sensitive gas sensor for toxic gases is an important issue in that it can reduce the damage caused by unexpected gas leaks. In this regard, in order to make the sensor accurate and highly responsive, we have investigated [...] Read more.
The development of a highly sensitive gas sensor for toxic gases is an important issue in that it can reduce the damage caused by unexpected gas leaks. In this regard, in order to make the sensor accurate and highly responsive, we have investigated which morphology is effective to improve the sensitivity and how the deposited nanoparticle affects the sensitivity by controlling the morphology of semiconductor oxides—either nanorod or nanoplate—and depositing metal nanoparticles on the semiconductor surface. In this study, we compared the CO gas sensitivity for sensors with different morphology (rod and plate) of ZnO nanostructure with metal nanoparticles (gold and copper) photodeposited and investigated the correlation between the gas sensitivity and some factors such as the morphology of ZnO and the properties of the deposited metal. Among the samples, Au/ZnO nanorod showed the best response (~86%) to the exposure of 100 ppm CO gas at 200 °C. The result showed that the electrical properties due to the deposition of metal species also have a strong influence on the sensor properties such as sensor response, working temperature, the response and recovery time, etc., together with the morphology of ZnO. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Gas Sensors Synthesis and Applications)
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Review

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Review
Nanostructured Gas Sensors: From Air Quality and Environmental Monitoring to Healthcare and Medical Applications
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(8), 1927; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11081927 - 26 Jul 2021
Viewed by 680
Abstract
In the last decades, nanomaterials have emerged as multifunctional building blocks for the development of next generation sensing technologies for a wide range of industrial sectors including the food industry, environment monitoring, public security, and agricultural production. The use of advanced nanosensing technologies, [...] Read more.
In the last decades, nanomaterials have emerged as multifunctional building blocks for the development of next generation sensing technologies for a wide range of industrial sectors including the food industry, environment monitoring, public security, and agricultural production. The use of advanced nanosensing technologies, particularly nanostructured metal-oxide gas sensors, is a promising technique for monitoring low concentrations of gases in complex gas mixtures. However, their poor conductivity and lack of selectivity at room temperature are key barriers to their practical implementation in real world applications. Here, we provide a review of the fundamental mechanisms that have been successfully implemented for reducing the operating temperature of nanostructured materials for low and room temperature gas sensing. The latest advances in the design of efficient architecture for the fabrication of highly performing nanostructured gas sensing technologies for environmental and health monitoring is reviewed in detail. This review is concluded by summarizing achievements and standing challenges with the aim to provide directions for future research in the design and development of low and room temperature nanostructured gas sensing technologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Gas Sensors Synthesis and Applications)
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