Special Issue "Nanocomposites from Renewable Resources"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 18 February 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Rina Tannenbaum
Website
Guest Editor
School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, United States
Interests: soft condensed matter and complex fluids; biomaterials and bio-based nanocomposites; bio-adhesion and tissue engineering; nanofluids and targeted drug delivery; interfacial and surface phenomena; self-assembly of hierarchically-organized multifunctional nanostructures, and related applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanocomposites from renewable resources constitute the new frontier in the development of novel materials that are cheap, versatile, and environmentally benign. In such nanocomposites, at least one of the components, such as the matrix or the filler, is biocompatible, biodegradable, and available through natural renewal and abundance. The development of such advanced biocompatible nanocomposites is in line with the national and global strategic vision of promoting sustainable materials platforms for high-value products, devices, and processes.

The impact of this emerging field lies in its reduction on the dependence on nonrenewable raw materials, such as steel and plastics synthesized from petrochemicals. These types of nanocomposites are expected to combine the advantages of enhanced thermomechanical and physicochemical properties due to the contributions by the individual components, with the ease of disposal and recycling. However, a major challenge is the preservation of high material performance that should not be compromised by the use of cheap, benign, renewable precursors and should be coupled with the ease of disposal and minimal environmental footprint, which are unavailable for nonrecyclable composites. This is because, in contrast to many synthetic nanocomposites derived from petrochemicals, the degradation of renewable nanocomposites can be selectively triggered at the end of their service life by either bacterial or nonbacterial mechanisms.

Nanocomposites based on renewable and biocompatible filler and matrix materials may find specific applications in technologically important areas such as surgical implants, tissue engineering scaffolds, structural materials, coatings, and energy harvesting.

This Special Issue invites manuscripts concerning the design synthesis, characterization, and applications of nanocomposites from renewable resources. Special interest will be research that highlights the advantages in the use of renewable precursors over conventional raw materials based on petrochemicals and probes their applicability in traditional industries without loss of functionality. Original articles describing combinations of various renewable matrices and fillers and the use of novel processing consolidation techniques to achieve optimal material properties will be highly welcome.

Prof. Rina Tannenbaum
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biopolymers
  • Natural products
  • Bio-based materials
  • Bio-based fibers
  • Biocompatible nanoparticles
  • Cellulose nanowhiskers
  • Bio-adhesion
  • Hydrogels
  • Environmental remediation
  • Enzymatic degradation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Preparation of Transparent and Thick CNF/Epoxy Composites by Controlling the Properties of Cellulose Nanofibrils
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 625; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040625 - 28 Mar 2020
Abstract
Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) have been used as reinforcing elements in optically transparent composites by combination with polymer matrices. In this study, strong, optically transparent, and thick CNF/epoxy composites were prepared by immersing two or four layers of CNF sheets in epoxy resin. The [...] Read more.
Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) have been used as reinforcing elements in optically transparent composites by combination with polymer matrices. In this study, strong, optically transparent, and thick CNF/epoxy composites were prepared by immersing two or four layers of CNF sheets in epoxy resin. The morphology of the CNF, the preparation conditions of the CNF sheet, and the grammage and layer numbers of the CNF sheets were controlled. The solvent-exchanged CNF sheets resulted in the production of a composite with high transparency and low haze. The CNF with smaller width and less aggregated fibrils, which are achieved by carboxymethylation, and a high number of grinding passes are beneficial in the production of optically transparent CNF/epoxy composites. Both the grammage and number of stacked layers of sheets in a composite affected the optical and mechanical properties of the composite. A composite with a thickness of 450–800 μm was prepared by stacking two or four layers of CNF sheets in epoxy resin. As the number of stacked sheets increased, light transmittance was reduced and the haze increased. The CNF/epoxy composites with two layers of low grammage (20 g/m2) sheets exhibited high light transmittance (>90%) and low haze (<5%). In addition, the composites with the low grammage sheet had higher tensile strength and elastic modulus compared with neat epoxy and those with high grammage sheets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocomposites from Renewable Resources)
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Open AccessArticle
A Skin-Inspired Stretchable, Self-Healing and Electro-Conductive Hydrogel with a Synergistic Triple Network for Wearable Strain Sensors Applied in Human-Motion Detection
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(12), 1737; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9121737 - 06 Dec 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Hydrogel-based strain sensors inspired by nature have attracted tremendous attention for their promising applications in advanced wearable electronics. Nevertheless, achieving a skin-like stretchable conductive hydrogel with synergistic characteristics, such as ideal stretchability, excellent sensing performance and high self-healing efficiency, remains challenging. Herein, a [...] Read more.
Hydrogel-based strain sensors inspired by nature have attracted tremendous attention for their promising applications in advanced wearable electronics. Nevertheless, achieving a skin-like stretchable conductive hydrogel with synergistic characteristics, such as ideal stretchability, excellent sensing performance and high self-healing efficiency, remains challenging. Herein, a highly stretchable, self-healing and electro-conductive hydrogel with a hierarchically triple-network structure was developed through a facile two-step preparation process. Firstly, 2, 2, 6, 6-tetrametylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils were homogeneously dispersed into polyacrylic acid hydrogel, with the presence of ferric ions as an ionic crosslinker to synthesize TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils/polyacrylic acid hydrogel via a one-pot free radical polymerization. A polypyrrole conductive network was then incorporated into the synthetic hydrogel matrix as the third-level gel network by polymerizing pyrrole monomers. The hierarchical 3D network was mutually interlocked through hydrogen bonds, ionic coordination interactions and physical entanglements of polymer chains to achieve the target composite hydrogels with a homogeneous texture, enhanced mechanical stretchability (elongation at break of ~890%), high viscoelasticity (maximum storage modulus of ~27.1 kPa), intrinsic self-healing ability (electrical and mechanical healing efficiencies of ~99.4% and 98.3%) and ideal electro-conductibility (~3.9 S m−1). The strain sensor assembled by the hybrid hydrogel, with a desired gauge factor of ~7.3, exhibits a sensitive, fast and stable current response for monitoring small/large-scale human movements in real-time, demonstrating promising applications in damage-free wearable electronics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocomposites from Renewable Resources)
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