Special Issue "Nano Mechanical Testing of Materials and Devices"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanophotonics, Characterization, Modelling, and Nanodevices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Nigel Jennett
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Institute for Future Transport and Cities & Faculty of Engineering, Environment and Computing, Coventry University, Coventry, United Kingdom
Dr. Xiaodong Hou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre of Excellence for Advanced Materials, Dongguan, China

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We warmly invite you to submit papers for publication, containing original research describing advances in nano-mechanical testing of materials or devices, and/or the research and development of nano-enabled materials. This may include, among other things:

  • Nano-scale measurements of materials or the measured properties of nanomaterials (such as: mechanical, tribological, fatigue); particularly welcome are reports of new properties or properties with a clear route to exploitation.
  • New or improved models, test methods, test protocols, and or testing devices applicable to small volume testing or the testing of nanomaterials.
  • Research and development into defining and overcoming the challenges of predicting larger-scale properties or performance from test results obtained at smaller length-scales; including investigations of plasticity and other size effects and the development of length-scale enabled constitutive models.

This Special Issue is also ideally suited to key overview or key conclusions papers or other high impact work from collaborative projects where instant open access is desirable, e.g., to satisfy funding body rapid open access requirements, and to accelerate impact.

Prof. Nigel Jennett
Dr. Xiaodong Hou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nano-scale
  • Nano-mechanical
  • size effects
  • nanomaterials
  • nano-metrology
  • small scale testing
  • length-scale enabled constitutive properties

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Revealing Nanoindentation Size-Dependent Creep Behavior in a La-Based Metallic Glassy Film
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(12), 1712; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9121712 - 01 Dec 2019
Abstract
We systematically studied nanoindentation size effect on creep deformation in a La-based metallic glassy film, including holding depth effect and indenter size effect. Creep displacement was mainly dependent on both holding strain and deformation volume beneath indenter. Under elastic holding, creep strain was [...] Read more.
We systematically studied nanoindentation size effect on creep deformation in a La-based metallic glassy film, including holding depth effect and indenter size effect. Creep displacement was mainly dependent on both holding strain and deformation volume beneath indenter. Under elastic holding, creep strain was merely holding strain–dependent. While for plastic holding, creep strain was greatly enhanced by adopting smaller indenter and/or decreasing holding depth at the same holding strain. A strong nanoindentation size effect on creep resistance was validated. Strain rate sensitivities (SRS) were calculated, which were obviously higher at elastic regions than at plastic holdings. The relationship between SRS value and creep mechanism in metallic glass was discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano Mechanical Testing of Materials and Devices)
Open AccessArticle
Surface Mechanical Characterization of Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Low-Density Polyethylene by Nanoindentation and Comparison with Bulk Properties
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1357; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101357 - 22 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Surface mechanical properties of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) reinforced by carbon nanofibers (CNFs) up to 3% weight load were investigated using nanoindentation (NI). Surface preparation of the nanocomposite was thoroughly investigated and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to analyze the surface roughness of [...] Read more.
Surface mechanical properties of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) reinforced by carbon nanofibers (CNFs) up to 3% weight load were investigated using nanoindentation (NI). Surface preparation of the nanocomposite was thoroughly investigated and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to analyze the surface roughness of the polished surfaces. The dispersion of nanofillers in the LDPE matrix was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of various penetration loads on the results and scattering of the data points was discussed. It was found by NI results that the addition of 3% weight CNF increased the elastic modulus of LDPE by 59% and its hardness up to 12%. The nano/micro-scale results were compared with macro-scale results obtained by the conventional tensile test as well as the theoretical results calculated by the Halpin-Tsai (HT) model. It was found that the modulus calculated by nanoindentation was twice that obtained by the conventional tensile test which was shown to be in excellent agreement with the HT model. Experimental results indicated that the addition of CNF to LDPE reduced its wear resistance property by reducing the hardness to modulus ratio. SEM micrographs of the semicrystalline microstructure of the CNF/LDPE nanocomposite along with the calculated NI imprints volume were examined to elaborate on how increasing the penetration depth resulted in a reduction of the coefficient of variation of the NI data/more statistically reliable data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano Mechanical Testing of Materials and Devices)
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Open AccessArticle
Quasicontinuum Simulation of the Effect of Lotus-Type Nanocavity on the Onset Plasticity of Single Crystal Al during Nanoindentation
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(10), 778; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8100778 - 30 Sep 2018
Abstract
Stress concentration around nanosized defects such as cavities always leads to plastic deformation and failure of solids. We investigate the effects of depth, size, and shape of a lotus-type nanocavity on onset plasticity of single crystal Al during nanoindentation on a (001) surface [...] Read more.
Stress concentration around nanosized defects such as cavities always leads to plastic deformation and failure of solids. We investigate the effects of depth, size, and shape of a lotus-type nanocavity on onset plasticity of single crystal Al during nanoindentation on a (001) surface using a quasicontinuum method. The results show that the presence of a nanocavity can greatly affect the contact stiffness (Sc) and yield stress (σy) of the matrix during nanoindentation. For a circular cavity, the Sc and σy gradually increase with the cavity depth. A critical depth can be identified, over which the Sc and σy are insensitive to the cavity depth and it is firstly observed that the nucleated dislocations extend into the matrix and form a y-shaped structure. Moreover, the critical depth varies approximately linearly with the indenter size, regarding the same cavity. The Sc almost linearly decreases with the cavity diameter, while the σy is slightly affected. For an ellipsoidal cavity, the Sc and σy increase with the aspect ratio (AR), while they are less affected when the AR is over 1. Our results shed light in the mechanical behavior of metals with cavities and could also be helpful in designing porous materials and structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano Mechanical Testing of Materials and Devices)
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Open AccessArticle
Toward Accurate Quantitative Elasticity Mapping of Rigid Nanomaterials by Atomic Force Microscopy: Effect of Acquisition Frequency, Loading Force, and Tip Geometry
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(8), 616; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8080616 - 14 Aug 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a popular tool for the mechanical mapping of soft nanomaterials due to its high spatial and force resolution. Its applications in rigid nanomaterials, however, have been underexplored. In this work, we studied elasticity mapping of common [...] Read more.
Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a popular tool for the mechanical mapping of soft nanomaterials due to its high spatial and force resolution. Its applications in rigid nanomaterials, however, have been underexplored. In this work, we studied elasticity mapping of common rigid materials by AFM, with a focus on factors that affect the accuracy of elasticity measurements. We demonstrated the advantages in speed and noise level by using high frequency mechanical mapping compared to the classical force volume mapping. We studied loading force dependency, and observed a consistent pattern on all materials, where measured elasticity increased with loading force before stabilizing. Tip radius was found to have a major impact on the accuracy of measured elasticity. The blunt tip with 200 nm radius measured elasticity with deviation from nominal values up to 13% in different materials, in contrast to 122% by the sharp tip with 40 nm radius. Plastic deformation is believed to be the major reason for this difference. Sharp tips, however, still hold advantages in resolution and imaging capability for nanomaterials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano Mechanical Testing of Materials and Devices)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type: Article
Title: Round Robin into best practices for Indentation Size Effects determination
Author: Ana Ruiz-Moreno
Affiliation: European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre, Nuclear Safety and Security Directorate, Westerduinweg 3, 1755LE Petten, the Netherlands
Email:
Abstract: The paper presents a statistical study of nanoindentation results obtained in seven European laboratories which have joined a round robin exercise to assess methods for the evaluation of indentation size effects. The study focuses on the characterization of ferritic/martensitic steels T91 and Eurofer97, envisaged as structural materials for nuclear fission and fusion applications, respectively. Depth-controlled single cycle measurements at various final indentation depths, force-controlled single cycle and force-controlled progressive multi-cycle measurements using a Berkovich tip at room temperature have been combined to determine the indentation hardness and the elastic modulus as a function of depth using the Oliver and Pharr analysis. Intra- and inter-laboratory variabilities have been determined. An elastic modulus correction has been applied to the hardness data to compensate for materials related systematic errors, like pile-up behaviour which is not accounted for by the Oliver and Pharr theory, and other sources of instrumental or methodological bias. The correction modifies the statistical hardness profiles and allows determining more reliable indentation size effects.
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