Special Issue "Implementation of Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Carly S. Filgueira
Website
Guest Editor
Departments of Nanomedicine and Cardiovascular Surgery, Houston Methodist Research Institute (HMRI), Houston, Texas, United States of America
Interests: alternative treatment approaches; physiological disorders; sustained release harnessing; nanotechnological approaches

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanomaterials have sparked a new era of therapeutic interventions. By engineering nanomaterials, the obstacles of conventional therapeutic intervention can be surpassed through sustained release, targeted drug therapy, and local delivery to a specific site of action. Local delivery improves the bioavailability of the therapeutic and reduces off-target adverse effects. Nanomaterials, such as those composed of lipids or polymers, can be used to carry drugs. Inorganic nanomaterials, such as those made of metals, can be readily functionalized and act as therapeutic modalities through photothermal and photoacoustic properties as well as radiative enhancement effects. Nanoparticles also offer a means to transport agents to diseased cells or tissues or act as diagnostic tools. Implantable devices with specially designed nanochannels allow for controlled and sustained release of therapeutics from a drug reservoir near a target site, minimizing adverse effects associated with systemic drug exposure. This Special Issue aims to explore the use of nanomedicine and nanomaterials to enhance therapeutic delivery. In harnessing nanotechnology, which consists of small, highly tunable platforms, we can develop effective therapeutics, devices, and techniques to vastly improve drug delivery and improve therapeutic outcomes.

Dr. Carly S. Filgueira
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • drug delivery
  • implantable devices
  • targeted therapy
  • nanocarriers
  • nanomedicine
  • site-specific drug action
  • sustained release

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Oral Bioavailability Enhancement of Raloxifene with Nanostructured Lipid Carriers
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(6), 1085; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10061085 - 31 May 2020
Abstract
Raloxifene hydrochloride (RLX) shows poor bioavailability (<2%), high inter-patient variability and extensive gut metabolism (>90%). The objective of this study was to develop nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for RLX to enhance its bioavailability. The NLC formulations were produced with glyceryl tribehenate and oleic [...] Read more.
Raloxifene hydrochloride (RLX) shows poor bioavailability (<2%), high inter-patient variability and extensive gut metabolism (>90%). The objective of this study was to develop nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for RLX to enhance its bioavailability. The NLC formulations were produced with glyceryl tribehenate and oleic acid. The particle characteristics, entrapment efficiency (EE), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in vitro drug release, oral bioavailability (in rats) and stability studies were performed. The optimized nanoparticles were 120 ± 3 nm in size with positive zeta potential (14.4 ± 0.5 mV); % EE was over 90% with the drug loading of 5%. The RLX exists in an amorphous form in the lipid matrix. The optimized RLX-NLC formulation showed sustained release in vitro. The RLX-NLC significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced oral bioavailability 3.19-fold as compared to RLX-free suspension in female Wistar rats. The RLX-NLC can potentially enhance the oral bioavailability of RLX. It can also improve the storage stability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implementation of Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery)
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