Special Issue "Haptics for Human Augmentation"

A special issue of Multimodal Technologies and Interaction (ISSN 2414-4088).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (17 May 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Troy McDaniel

Computer Science and Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Haptic Languages; Tactile Display Design; Sensory Substitution; Assistive Technology
Guest Editor
Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan

Computer Science and Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Haptic User Interfaces; Machine Learning; Multimedia; Assistive Technology
Guest Editor
Dr. Ramin Tadayon

Computer Science and Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Multimodal Interfaces; HCI; Assistive Technology; Rehabilitation; Serious Games; Artificial Intelligence
Guest Editor
Dr. Yuichi Kurita

Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Physical Human Robot Interaction; Human Augmentation; Haptic Design; Medical Engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you to submit to our special issue on haptic technology for human augmentation. Haptics is an interdisciplinary field exploring the science of touch and technology. While still in its infancy, tremendous interest, advancement, and commercial potential has been seen within the last decade. At the same time, interest in human augmentation, or expansion of our senses and abilities, has grown. It is therefore timely to explore the intersection of haptics and human augmentation. Preliminary explorations include vibrotactile compass belts that give users a new “sense” of direction; soft “muscles” that increase strength and reduce fatigue; and electrotactile devices that build new balance systems in the brain for those with vestibular damage. While much effort for human augmentation has been applied toward rehabilitative and assistive purposes, augmentation need not restrict itself to disability; instead, when viewed in the general sense as “augmenting human ability”, haptic technology is applicable in a broader range of areas. If we consider ability as a spectrum, haptic technology for human augmentation provides gains in ability regardless of where a user falls within this spectrum, whether we are enhancing “disability” to “ability”, or “ability” to “super-ability”. This special issue invites contributions in areas of haptic sensory substitution/augmentation; haptic assistive technology for sensory, physical, or cognitive impairments; haptic rehabilitative technology including new devices for neurorehabilitation; haptic healthcare technology including surgical simulators and devices for personal health and wellbeing; haptic gerontechnology for the aging population; haptic human-computer interaction; multimedia that engages the sense of touch including virtual reality, augmented reality, and mixed reality; multimodal interaction between the sense of touch and our other senses; as well as user studies, including psychological and psychophysical studies, that make fundamental contributions toward realizing haptic technology for human augmentation.

Dr. Troy McDaniel
Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan
Dr. Ramin Tadayon
Dr. Yuichi Kurita
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Multimodal Technologies and Interaction is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Haptic Modeling
  • Haptic Feedback
  • Haptic Devices
  • Application of Haptics Technology
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Human-Centered Computing
  • Human Factors
  • Assistive Technology
  • Rehabilitative Technology
  • Sensory Substitution
  • Sensory Augmentation
  • Human Augmentation
  • Physical Human-Robot Interaction
  • Exoskeleton
  • Virtual Reality
  • Musculoskeletal Analysis
  • Sports Augmentation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Recognition of Tactile Facial Action Units by Individuals Who Are Blind and Sighted: A Comparative Study
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3020032
Received: 16 March 2019 / Revised: 24 April 2019 / Accepted: 6 May 2019 / Published: 8 May 2019
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Abstract
Given that most cues exchanged during a social interaction are nonverbal (e.g., facial expressions, hand gestures, body language), individuals who are blind are at a social disadvantage compared to their sighted peers. Very little work has explored sensory augmentation in the context of [...] Read more.
Given that most cues exchanged during a social interaction are nonverbal (e.g., facial expressions, hand gestures, body language), individuals who are blind are at a social disadvantage compared to their sighted peers. Very little work has explored sensory augmentation in the context of social assistive aids for individuals who are blind. The purpose of this study is to explore the following questions related to visual-to-vibrotactile mapping of facial action units (the building blocks of facial expressions): (1) How well can individuals who are blind recognize tactile facial action units compared to those who are sighted? (2) How well can individuals who are blind recognize emotions from tactile facial action units compared to those who are sighted? These questions are explored in a preliminary pilot test using absolute identification tasks in which participants learn and recognize vibrotactile stimulations presented through the Haptic Chair, a custom vibrotactile display embedded on the back of a chair. Study results show that individuals who are blind are able to recognize tactile facial action units as well as those who are sighted. These results hint at the potential for tactile facial action units to augment and expand access to social interactions for individuals who are blind. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Haptics for Human Augmentation)
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