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Electrochemistry Applied in Biological Systems

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Electrochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 2267

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Instituto de Microelectrónica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM (CSIC), Campus de la Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: electroanalytical chemistry; spectroelectrochemistry; point of care devices; miniaturization; biosensors.
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Department of Information Engineering, University of Pisa, Via Girolamo Caruso, 16, 56122 Pisa, PI, Italy
Interests: custom electronic instrumentation; wearable devices; miniaturized smart sensors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
Interests: electroanalysis; drug monitoring; in vivo sensing; aptamers; electrochemical biosensors; implantable sensors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For decades, the inherent simplicity, fast response, sensitivity, and convenience of electrochemical techniques have led to remarkable advances in many areas, including Biology. Electrochemistry being an interfacial science, it is perfectly suited for the study of biological systems. Familiar examples include the detection of biomarkers and metabolites through biosensors, the electrical stimulation of cells and tissues in state-of-the-art organ-on-a-chip devices, health monitoring through implantable and wearable devices, single-cell imaging, and fundamental studies involving ion transport across cell membranes, electron transfer in biomolecules, or enabling a deeper understanding of cell communication and signalling.

In recent years, advances in micro- and nanofabrication techniques, electronic devices, materials synthesis, and (bio)chemical methods have had a tremendous impact across all areas of Electrochemistry, enabling novel approaches for the use of electrochemical strategies in biological applications.

This Special Issue aims to cover the most recent advances in Electrochemistry applied to the Biology, providing a wide perspective of the latest progress and the current challenges facing this exciting scientific field. Most of the work of Electrochemistry in biological systems has been, and remains, empirical, somewhat overlooking the development of suitable and badly needed theory to go hand-in-hand with such experimental work. Therefore, theoretical and not just experimental works are particularly encouraged and equally welcome in this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Javier Del Campo
Dr. Michele Dei
Dr. Miguel A. Pellitero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ion transport biological membranes (electroporation)
  • fundamental (bio)electrochemistry
  • charge transfer processes
  • nanopore electrochemistry
  • scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM)
  • single-cell imaging
  • electrosynthesis
  • electrical stimulation
  • bioelectronics
  • biosensors and bio-fuel cells
  • bioelectroanalytical methods
  • health monitoring

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 67455 KiB  
Article
Electrochemical Characteristics of Shewanella loihica PV-4 on Reticulated Vitreous Carbon (RVC) with Different Potentials Applied
by Shixin Wang, Xiaoming Zhang and Enrico Marsili
Molecules 2022, 27(16), 5330; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27165330 - 21 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1718
Abstract
The current output of an anodic bioelectrochemical system (BES) depends upon the extracellular electron transfer (EET) rate from electricigens to the electrodes. Thus, investigation of EET mechanisms between electricigens and solid electrodes is essential. Here, reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) electrodes are used to [...] Read more.
The current output of an anodic bioelectrochemical system (BES) depends upon the extracellular electron transfer (EET) rate from electricigens to the electrodes. Thus, investigation of EET mechanisms between electricigens and solid electrodes is essential. Here, reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) electrodes are used to increase the surface available for biofilm formation of the known electricigen Shewanella loihica PV-4, which is limited in conventional flat electrodes. S. loihica PV-4 utilizes flavin-mediated EET at potential lower than the outer membrane cytochromes (OMC), while at higher potential, both direct electron transfer (DET) and mediated electron transfer (MET) contribute to the current output. Results show that high electrode potential favors cell attachment on RVC, which enhances the current output. DET is the prevailing mechanism in early biofilm, while the contribution of MET to current output increased as the biofilm matured. Electrochemical analysis under starvation shows that the mediators could be confined in the biofilm. The morphology of biofilm shows bacteria distributed on the top layer of honeycomb structures, preferentially on the flat areas. This study provides insights into the EET pathways of S. loihica PV-4 on porous RVC electrodes at different biofilm ages and different set potential, which is important for the design of real-world BES. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemistry Applied in Biological Systems)
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