Special Issue "High Pressure Minerals"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2017) | Viewed by 7941

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Stefano Caporali
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Industrial Enginnering Department (DIEF), Università Degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy
Interests: surface chemistry; electrochemistry; corrosion mitigation; coatings; functional materials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the past few years, high-pressure mineral research has observed increasing interest. This is especially due to technological breakthroughs, such as the introduction of pressure generating technologies. The diamond anvil cell and shock wave compression devices allowed the investigation of materials at physical conditions that were unimaginable only 20 years ago. The application of high pressure, especially with high temperatures, has revealed unexpected crystal structures that become exciting modifications of physical and chemical properties of minerals. These experimental studies, especially when coupled with theoretical investigation based on molecular dynamic simulation, has resulted in a fundamental importance in many scientific fields, ranging from the constitution and the dynamics of planets' interiors, to the design of new functional materials. The variety of the mineral phases observed in these extreme conditions provides a common ground, bridging scientific communities with different cultural and experimental backgrounds. Insights from high-pressure studies have guided, for example, the design of new materials for electronic and pharmaceutical applications, as well as provided glimpses into how to explain questions related to the Solar System’s evolution, planets geodynamics, polymorph stability, organic reactivity, and energy conversion systems, to name a few.

This Special Issue will provide a timely opportunity to report on recent progress in the full range of modern mineralogical and geodynamical research, as well as in material science investigations. Papers providing experimental data on high-pressure crystallography, synthesis, spectroscopies, diffraction, and computer simulations at various levels are also welcome.

Dr. Stefano Caporali
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • high pressure chemistry
  • shock phases
  • geodynamics
  • lower mantle materials
  • hypervelocity impacts
  • minerals
  • materials
  • crystallography
  • polymorphs

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Different Conditions of Formation Experienced by Iron Meteorites as Suggested by Neutron Diffraction Investigation
Minerals 2018, 8(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/min8010019 - 12 Jan 2018
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1923
Abstract
In this communication, we report the results of a preliminary neutron diffraction investigation of iron meteorites. These planetary materials are mainly constituted by metallic iron with variable nickel contents, and, owing to their peculiar genesis, are considered to offer the best constrains on [...] Read more.
In this communication, we report the results of a preliminary neutron diffraction investigation of iron meteorites. These planetary materials are mainly constituted by metallic iron with variable nickel contents, and, owing to their peculiar genesis, are considered to offer the best constrains on the early stages of planetary accretion. Nine different iron meteorites, representative of different chemical and structural groups, thought to have been formed in very different pressure and temperature conditions, were investigated, evidencing variances in crystallites size, texturing, and residual strain. The variability of these parameters and their relationship, were discussed in respect to possible diverse range of petrological conditions, mainly pressure and cooling rate, experienced by these materials during the crystallization stage and/or as consequence of post accretion events. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Minerals)
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Article
First Principles Thermodynamics of Minerals at HP–HT Conditions: MgO as a Prototypical Material
Minerals 2017, 7(10), 183; https://doi.org/10.3390/min7100183 - 28 Sep 2017
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 2949
Abstract
Ab initio thermodynamic properties, equation of state and phase stability of periclase (MgO, B1-type structure) have been investigated in a broad P–T range (0–160 GPa; 0–3000 K) in order to set a model reference system for phase equilibria simulations under deep Earth conditions. [...] Read more.
Ab initio thermodynamic properties, equation of state and phase stability of periclase (MgO, B1-type structure) have been investigated in a broad P–T range (0–160 GPa; 0–3000 K) in order to set a model reference system for phase equilibria simulations under deep Earth conditions. Phonon dispersion calculations performed on large supercells using the finite displacement method and in the framework of quasi-harmonic approximation highlight the performance of the Becke three-parameter Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid density functional in predicting accurate thermodynamic functions (heat capacity, entropy, thermal expansivity, isothermal bulk modulus) and phase reaction boundaries at high pressure and temperature. A first principles Mie–Grüneisen equation of state based on lattice vibrations directly provides a physically-consistent description of thermal pressure and P–V–T relations without any need to rely on empirical parameters or other phenomenological formalisms that could give spurious anomalies or uncontrolled extrapolations at HP–HT. The post-spinel phase transformation, Mg2SiO4 (ringwoodite) = MgO (periclase) + MgSiO3 (bridgmanite), is taken as a computational example to illustrate how first principles theory combined with the use of hybrid functionals is able to provide sound results on the Clapeyron slope, density change and P–T location of equilibrium mineral reactions relevant to mantle dynamics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Minerals)
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Article
Experimental Investigation of Biotite-Rich Schist Reacting with B-Bearing Fluids at Upper Crustal Conditions and Correlated Tourmaline Formation
Minerals 2017, 7(9), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/min7090155 - 28 Aug 2017
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2803
Abstract
Fluid–rock interaction experiments between a biotite-rich schist (from Mt. Calamita Formation, Elba Island, Italy) and B-bearing aqueous fluids were carried out at 500–600 °C and 100–130 MPa. The experiments have been carried out in order to reproduce the reaction, which would have produced [...] Read more.
Fluid–rock interaction experiments between a biotite-rich schist (from Mt. Calamita Formation, Elba Island, Italy) and B-bearing aqueous fluids were carried out at 500–600 °C and 100–130 MPa. The experiments have been carried out in order to reproduce the reaction, which would have produced tourmalinisation of the biotite schist, supposedly by circulation of magmatic fluids issued from leucogranitic dykes. The reacting fluids were either NaCl-free or NaCl-bearing (20 wt %) aqueous solutions, with variable concentration of H3BO3 (0.01–3.2 M). The experimental results show that tourmaline (belonging to the alkali group) crystallise under high-temperature and upper crustal conditions (500–600 °C, 100–130 MPa) when H3BO3 concentration in the system is greater than 1.6 M. The composition of tourmaline is either dravitic (Mg-rich) or schorlitic (Fe-rich), depending if an NaCl-bearing or NaCl-free aqueous solution is used. In the first case, a significant amount of Fe released from biotite dissolution remains in the Cl-rich solution resulting from the experiment. By contrast, when pure water is used, Na/K exchange in feldspars makes Na available for tourmaline crystallisation. The high concentration of Fe in the residual fluid has an important metallogenic implication because it indicates that the interaction between the saline B-rich fluid of magmatic derivation and biotite-rich schists, besides producing tourmalinisation, is capable of mobilising significant amounts of Fe. This process could have produced, in part or totally, the Fe deposits located close to the quartz–tourmaline veins and metasomatic bodies of the Mt. Calamita Formation. Moreover, the super-hot reservoir that likely occurs in the deepest part of the Larderello–Travale geothermal field would also be the site of an extensive reaction between the B-rich fluid and biotite-bearing rocks producing tourmaline. Thus, tourmaline occurrence can be a useful guide during deep drilling toward a super-hot reservoir. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Pressure Minerals)
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