Special Issue "Biomineralization of Iron and Manganese: Functions and Environmental Applications"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomineralization and Biominerals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2022 | Viewed by 1420

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Naoyuki Miyata
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biological Environment, Akita Prefectural University, Shimoshinjo-Nakano, Akita 010-0195, Japan
Interests: microbial manganese and iron oxidation; biogeochemistry; metal removal and recovery; microbial ecology
Prof. Dr. Yukinori Tani
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental and Life Sciences, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Shizuoka 422-8526, Japan
Interests: manganese biogeochemistry; trace element cycles; biogenic mineral formation; redox and catalytic activities of biominerals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Iron and manganese oxide biominerals, which are produced via redox activities of microorganisms in aquatic and terrestrial environments, are of significance in both biogeochemical and environmental, technological contexts. An iron oxide biomineral, schwertmannite, occurring in acidic environments, incorporates metal oxyanions (e.g., As, Cr, Mo, and Se). A manganese oxide resembling poorly crystalline d-MnO2 serves as a fine adsorbent for metal cations and as a strong oxidant for inorganic and organic compounds, owing to its nanostructural and redox features. Such mineral functions (i.e., adsorption and redox and catalytic features) have raised important implications for environmental applications, including remediation or recovery of trace metal ions, decomposition of xenobiotic chemicals, and usage as a new material in industrial engineering.

We invite contributions on the formation of iron and manganese oxide minerals by microbially driven redox reactions; interactions of biomenerals with trace elements and inorganic and organic compounds; the mineral formation process and geochemical functions in aquatic and terrestrial environments; and their environmental applications. We especially welcome submissions where microbial contributions to interactions are discussed, as they have been shown to strongly affect the mineral functions. Studies on synthetic biomineral analogues and interaction mechanisms are also encouraged for submission.

Prof. Dr. Naoyuki Miyata
Prof. Dr. Yukinori Tani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • biomineralization
  • biogenic iron oxides
  • biogenic manganese oxides
  • microorganisms
  • metal sorption
  • redox reactions
  • catalytic reactions
  • toxic metal removal
  • toxic chemical remediation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Pb-Bearing Ferrihydrite Bioreduction and Secondary-Mineral Precipitation during Fe Redox Cycling
Minerals 2022, 12(5), 610; https://doi.org/10.3390/min12050610 - 12 May 2022
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Abstract
The significant accumulation of Pb from anthropogenic activities threatens environmental ecosystems. In the environment, iron oxides are one of the main carriers of Pb. Thus, the redox cycling of iron oxides, which is due to biotic and abiotic pathways, and which leads to [...] Read more.
The significant accumulation of Pb from anthropogenic activities threatens environmental ecosystems. In the environment, iron oxides are one of the main carriers of Pb. Thus, the redox cycling of iron oxides, which is due to biotic and abiotic pathways, and which leads to their dissolution or transformation, controls the fate of Pb. However, a knowledge gap exists on the bioreduction in Pb-bearing ferrihydrites, secondary-mineral precipitation, and Pb partitioning during the bioreduction/oxidation/bioreduction cycle. In this study, Pb-bearing ferrihydrite (Fh_Pb) with various Pb/(Fe+Pb) molar ratios (i.e., 0, 2, and 5%) were incubated with the iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 for 7 days, oxidized for 7 days (atmospheric O2), and bioreduced a second time for 7 days. Pb doping led to a drop in the rate and the extent of the reduction. Lepidocrocite (23–56%) and goethite (44–77%) formed during the first reduction period. Magnetite (72–84%) formed during the second reduction. The extremely-low-dissolved and bioavailable Pb concentrations were measured during the redox cycles, which indicates that the Pb significantly sorbed onto the minerals that were formed. Overall, this study highlights the influence of Pb and redox cycling on the bioreduction of Pb-bearing iron oxides, as well as on the nature of the secondary minerals that are formed. Full article
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Article
Simultaneous Sequestration of Co2+ and Mn2+ by Fungal Manganese Oxide through Asbolane Formation
Minerals 2022, 12(3), 358; https://doi.org/10.3390/min12030358 - 15 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 580
Abstract
Biogenic manganese oxides (BMOs) have attractive environmental applications owing to their metal sequestration and oxidizing abilities. Although Co readily accumulates into Mn oxide phases in natural environments, the Co2+ sequestration process that accompanies the enzymatic Mn(II) oxidation of exogenous Mn2+ remains [...] Read more.
Biogenic manganese oxides (BMOs) have attractive environmental applications owing to their metal sequestration and oxidizing abilities. Although Co readily accumulates into Mn oxide phases in natural environments, the Co2+ sequestration process that accompanies the enzymatic Mn(II) oxidation of exogenous Mn2+ remains unknown. Therefore, we prepared newly formed BMOs in a liquid culture of Acremonium strictum KR21-2 and conducted repeated sequestration experiments in a Mn2+/Co2+ binary solution at pH 7.0. The sequestration of Co2+ by newly formed BMOs (~1 mM Mn) readily progressed in parallel with the oxidation of exogenous Mn2+, with higher efficiencies than that in single Co2+ solutions when the initial Co2+ concentrations (0.16–0.8 mM) were comparable to or lower than the exogenous Mn2+ concentration (~0.8 mM). This demonstrates a synergetic effect on Co sequestration. Powder X-ray diffraction showed a typical pattern for asbolane only when newly formed BMOs were treated in Mn2+/Co2+ binary systems, implying that the enzymatic Mn(II) oxidation by newly formed BMOs favored asbolane formation. Cobalt K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements showed that both Co(II) and Co(III) participated in the formation of the asbolane phase in the binary solutions, whereas most of the primary Co2+ was sequestered as Co(III) in the single Co2+ solutions, which partly explains the synergetic effects on Co sequestration efficiency in the binary solutions. The results presented here provide new insights into the mechanism of Co interaction with Mn oxide phases through asbolane formation by enzymatic Mn(II) oxidation under circumneutral pH conditions. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Precipitation of Biogenic Manganese Oxide Minerals as a Remediation Tool for Neutral Mine Drainage Containing Manganese(II) and Other Metal Ions

Author: Naoyuki Miyata

Abstract: The treatment of mine drainage is a significant concern worldwide because of severe impact of toxic metals in the environment. The microbial manganese (Mn) oxidation, leading to the precipitation of Mn oxide minerals, is considered a potential tool for clarifying mine drainages containing Mn(II); however, whether the microbial activity can function effectively under metal-rich, organic carbon-limited conditions remains to be elucidated. This study demonstrates that the Mn biomineralization can occur under the metal-rich, organic carbon-limited conditions, and this provides a promising strategy for remediation of mine drainages containing Mn(II) and other metal ions.

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