Special Issue "Yeast in Winemaking"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 February 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Hervé Alexandre
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut Universitaire de la Vigne et du Vin, University of Burgundy, Dijon, France
Interests: Saccharomyces; wine; yeast; lactic acid bacteria; PCR; SDS-PAGE; genetics microbiology; food Science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Yeast is the main contributor of alcoholic fermentation in wine and has been the object of extensive research with two main focuses, the first one being controlling alcoholic fermentation and the second one improving wine sensorial profile. These last few years, the debate has shifted to a better understanding of wine ecology and to finding biological alternative to sulfite. In this regard, this Special Issue will present the latest discoveries on wine yeast ecology using metagenomic techniques that help to understand the influence of viticultural and enological practices in the yeast consortium. The scientific advances concerning the different strategies to improve the sensorial profile will receive special attention. Among the strategies, the use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts, their properties, and their impact on the sensory profile will be reported. Yeast hybrids are another way to improve the sensorial profile of wines together with yeast nutrition. This last approach helps to control alcoholic fermentation but also impacts the volatile compounds produced by yeasts. Biological alternatives to sulfite need to understand spoilage microorganisms and interactions between microorganisms. Some of the articles to be published shall present some emerging technologies and approaches, like metagenomics, QTL mapping and metabolomics, and their applications that contribute to a better understanding of yeast interaction, yeast metabolism, and yeast genetics.

Prof. Hervé Alexandre
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • yeast
  • winemaking
  • alcoholic fermentation
  • non-Saccharomyces
  • emerging technologies

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
First Proteomic Approach to Identify Cell Death Biomarkers in Wine Yeasts during Sparkling Wine Production
Microorganisms 2019, 7(11), 542; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7110542 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
Apoptosis and later autolysis are biological processes which take place in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during industrial fermentation processes, which involve costly and time-consuming aging periods. Therefore, the identification of potential cell death biomarkers can contribute to the creation of a long-term strategy in order [...] Read more.
Apoptosis and later autolysis are biological processes which take place in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during industrial fermentation processes, which involve costly and time-consuming aging periods. Therefore, the identification of potential cell death biomarkers can contribute to the creation of a long-term strategy in order to improve and accelerate the winemaking process. Here, we performed a proteomic analysis based on the detection of possible apoptosis and autolysis protein biomarkers in two industrial yeast strains commonly used in post-fermentative processes (sparkling wine secondary fermentation and biological aging) under typical sparkling wine elaboration conditions. Pressure had a negatively effect on viability for flor yeast, whereas the sparkling wine strain seems to be more adapted to these conditions. Flor yeast strain experienced an increase in content of apoptosis-related proteins, glucanases and vacuolar proteases at the first month of aging. Significant correlations between viability and apoptosis proteins were established in both yeast strains. Multivariate analysis based on the proteome of each process allowed to distinguish among samples and strains. The proteomic profile obtained in this study could provide useful information on the selection of wine strains and yeast behavior during sparkling wine elaboration. Additionally, the use of flor yeasts for sparkling wine improvement and elaboration is proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeast in Winemaking)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop