Special Issue "Mycorrhizal Fungi"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Microbe Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Mohamed Hijri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut de Recherche en Biologie Végétale, Université de Montréal, 4101 Rue Sherbrooke Est, Montréal, QC H1X 2B2, Canada
AgroBioSciences, Mohammed VI Polytechnic University, Lot 660, Hay Moulay Rachid, Ben Guerir, 43150 Morocco
Interests: microbial genomics; fungal genetics; plant–microbe interactions; environmental microbiology; symbiosis; mycorrhizas

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mycorrhiza is among the most common and widespread symbiosis between fungi and plant roots on earth. In recent decades, interest in this symbiosis has increased substantially, not only because of its potential benefits to agriculture, forestry, and phytoremediation but also because it helps us to understand the basis of complex mechanisms involved in plant–microbe interactions. Trappe and Fogel (1977) said 'Most woody plants require mycorrhizae to survive, and most herbaceous plants need them to thrive. Despite their relatively small biomass, the mycorrhizal fungi (mycobionts) are vital for uptake and accumulation of ions from soil and translocation to hosts because of their high metabolic rate and strategically diffuse distribution in the upper soil layers'. It is now well recognised that mycorrhizal symbiosis helps plants exposed to biotic and abiotic stresses, including salinity, drought, toxic trace elements, pH, extreme temperatures, and soilborne pathogens. These aspects attract media attention as well as public interest.

This Special Issue of Microorganisms welcomes researchers to contribute research articles, reviews, and opinions addressing the latest knowledge on mycorrhizas, including molecular biology, genomics, functional biodiversity, ecology, phytoremediation, biological control, biofertilizers, microbial interaction, and sustainable management, both in fundamental research and its applications.

* Trappe, J. M. & Fogel, R. C. (1977) Range Science Department Science Series (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO), Vol. 26, pp. 205-214.

Prof. Dr. Mohamed Hijri
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • arbuscular mycorrhiza
  • ectomycorrhiza
  • ericoïd mycorrhiza
  • orchid mycorrhiza
  • mycorrhizal fungi
  • symbiosis
  • mycorrhiza–microbe interactions
  • rhizosphere biology
  • mycorhizosphere
  • mycorrhiza-based inoculants
  • biofertilizers

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Aided Phytoremediation to Clean Up Dioxins/Furans-Aged Contaminated Soil: Correlation between Microbial Communities and Pollutant Dissipation
Microorganisms 2019, 7(11), 523; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7110523 - 03 Nov 2019
Abstract
To restore and clean up polluted soils, aided phytoremediation was found to be an effective, eco-friendly, and feasible approach in the case of many organic pollutants. However, little is known about its potential efficiency regarding polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans-contaminated soils. Thus, phytoremediation of [...] Read more.
To restore and clean up polluted soils, aided phytoremediation was found to be an effective, eco-friendly, and feasible approach in the case of many organic pollutants. However, little is known about its potential efficiency regarding polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans-contaminated soils. Thus, phytoremediation of aged dioxins/furans-contaminated soil was carried out through microcosm experiments vegetated with alfalfa combined with different amendments: an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculum (Funneliformis mosseae), a biosurfactant (rhamnolipids), a dioxins/furans degrading-bacterium (Sphingomonas wittichii RW1), and native microbiota. The total dioxins/furans dissipation was estimated to 23%, which corresponds to 48 ng.kg−1 of soil, after six months of culture in the vegetated soil combined with the four amendments compared to the non-vegetated soil. Our findings showed that the dioxins/furans dissipation resulted from the stimulation of soil microbial enzyme activities (fluorescein diacetate hydrolase and dehydrogenase) and the increase of bacterial abundance, richness, and diversity, as well as fungal diversity. Amplicon sequencing using Illumina MiSeq analysis led to identification of several bacterial (Bacillaceae, Sphingomonadaceae) and fungal (Chaetomium) groups known to be involved in dioxins/furans degradation. Furthermore, concomitant cytotoxicity and dioxins/furans concentration decreases were pointed out in the phytoremediated soil. The current study demonstrated the usefulness of combining different types of amendments to improve phytoremediation efficacy of aged dioxins/furans-contaminated soils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mycorrhizal Fungi)
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