Special Issue "Micronutrient Metabolism in Critically Ill Patients"

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Endocrinology and Clinical Metabolic Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Elena Planells
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physiology, University of Granada, Granada, Spain
Interests: critically ill patients; micronutrients; vitamins; minerals; nutritional assessment; requirements; biomarkers; antioxidants; oxidative stress; inflammation; infection; supplementation
Dr. Yenifer Gamarra
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physiology, University of Granada, Granada, Spain
Interests: critically ill patients; micronutrients; vitamins; minerals; nutritional assessment; requirements; biomarkers; antioxidants; oxidative stress; inflammation; infection; supplementation
Prof. Dr. Jorge Molina-López
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Integrated Didactics. University of Huelva, Huelva, Spain
Interests: critically ill patients; micronutrients; vitamins; minerals; nutritional assessment; requirements; biomarkers; antioxidants; oxidative stress; inflammation; infection; supplementation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Critically ill patients present a hypercatabolic situation and systemic inflammation that causes the accelerated depletion of micronutrients, indispensable for the balance of antioxidant systems and homeostasis. This leads to a worse evolution during their stay in the intensive care unit (ICU). The assessment of the status of micronutrients from admission to the ICU, their possible supplementation, and their monitoring during the hospital stay are key in these high-risk patients in order to optimize the therapeutic strategy and improve the results of intervention.

This Special Issue will include research articles and reviews related to critically ill patients of any etiology and implications for the behavior of micronutrients. Therefore, vitamin and mineral biomarkers associated with inflammation, infection, alteration of oxidative stress and antioxidant status, phosphocalcic metabolism, and the immune system, among others, will be welcome.

Prof. Dr. Elena Planells
Dr. Yenifer Gamarra
Prof. Dr. Jorge Molina-López
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Critically ill patients
  • Micronutrients
  • Vitamins
  • Minerals
  • Nutritional assessment
  • Requirements
  • Biomarkers
  • Antioxidants
  • Oxidative stress
  • Inflammation
  • Infection
  • Supplementation

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Low Levels of Few Micronutrients May Impact COVID-19 Disease Progression: An Observational Study on the First Wave
Metabolites 2021, 11(9), 565; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11090565 - 24 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1398
Abstract
We report an observational study performed between March and May 2020 in a Spanish university hospital during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. The main objective was to analyse the association between the levels of micronutrients in severe COVID-19 patients and their outcome. Adult patients with [...] Read more.
We report an observational study performed between March and May 2020 in a Spanish university hospital during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. The main objective was to analyse the association between the levels of micronutrients in severe COVID-19 patients and their outcome. Adult patients with a positive polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) for SARS-CoV-2 in the nasopharyngeal swab or in tracheal aspirate culture in the case of intubation were included. Micronutrient data were obtained from plasma analysis of a standard nutritional assessment performed within the first 24 h of hospital admission. Vitamins A, B6, C and E were analysed with HPLC methods; 25-OH-vitamin D by immunoassay and zinc by colorimetric measurements. One hundred and twenty patients were included. We found that 74.2% patients had low levels of zinc (normal levels >84 µg/dL) with a mean value of 63.5 (SD 13.5); 71.7% patients had low levels of vitamin A (normal levels >0.3 mg/L) with a mean value of 0.17 (SD 0.06); 42.5% patients had low levels of vitamin B6 (normal levels >3.6 ng/mL) with a mean value of 2.2 (SD 0.9); 100% patients had low levels of vitamin C (normal levels >0.4 mg/dL) with a mean value of 0.14 (SD 0.05); 74.3% patients had low values of vitamin D (normal levels >20 ng/mL) with mean value of 11.4 (SD 4.3); but only 5.8% of patients had low levels of vitamin E (normal levels >5 mg/L) with a mean value of 3.95 (SD 0.87). The variables associated with the need for ICU admission were low levels of zinc (standard error 0.566, 95% CI 0.086 to 0.790, p = 0.017), low levels of vitamin A (standard error 0.582, 95% CI 0.061 to 0.594, p = 0.004), age over 65 (standard error 0.018, 95% CI 0.917 to 0.985, p = 0.005) and male gender (standard error 0.458, 95% CI 1.004 to 6.040, p = 0.049). The only variable that was independently associated with the need for orotracheal intubation was low levels of vitamin A (standard error 0.58, 95% CI 0.042 to 0.405, p = 0.000). Conclusions: Low levels of vitamin A and zinc are associated with a greater need for admission to the ICU and orotracheal intubation. Patients older than 65 years had higher mortality. Randomized clinical trials are needed to examine whether micronutrient supplementation could be beneficial as an adjunctive treatment in COVID-19. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micronutrient Metabolism in Critically Ill Patients)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop