Effects of Bioactive Compounds on Metabolic Syndrome

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Metabolomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 16 September 2024 | Viewed by 4150

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Chodźki 4a, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
Interests: functional food; antioxidant properties; polyphenols; phenolic acids; extraction; HPLC
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacology, Medical University of Lublin, Chodźki 4a, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
Interests: ion chromatography; environmental pollutants; endocrine disruptors; autism spectrum disorder

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Guest Editor
Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Chodźki 4a, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
Interests: biological properties; liquid chromatography; antioxidants; extraction methods; functional food; polyphenols
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the term metabolic syndrome (i.e., MetS) became one of the most commonly used phrases in medical sciences. This concept is defined as many interrelated metabolic factors, the co-occurrence of which contributes the increaed risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. MetS includes, but is not limited to, obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance and/or hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, or pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic conditions. The pathogenesis of this syndrome has not been fully understood. It is indicated that the predominant causes of MetS are primarily insulin resistance and visceral obesity; however, there are other plausible risk factors predisposed to metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, patients with MetS require substantial healthcare service, and consequently more medical professionals are involved in their treatment.

We welcome the submission of original research articles or review papers as contributions to this Special Issue of Metabolites, titled “Effects of Bioactive Compounds on Metabolic Syndrome”. This special edition aims to expand upon the knowledge on such an important health problem as MetS. We invite you to publish articles on the systematization of theories on this subject, as well as the patiogenesis, prevention, and treatment of metabolic syndrome.

Dr. Kamila Kasprzak-Drozd
Dr. Przemysław Niziński
Prof. Dr. Anna Oniszczuk
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • metabolic syndrome
  • bioactive compounds
  • secondary plant metabolites
  • cardiovascular disease
  • obesity
  • diabetes mellitus

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 3137 KiB  
Article
An Egg White-Derived Peptide Enhances Systemic Insulin Sensitivity and Modulates Markers of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Obese, Insulin Resistant Mice
by Stepheny C. de Campos Zani, Ren Wang, Hellen Veida-Silva, Robin D. Clugston, Jessica T. Y. Yue, Marcelo A. Mori, Jianping Wu and Catherine B. Chan
Metabolites 2023, 13(2), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo13020174 - 24 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2397
Abstract
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, is a global health problem. Currently, no pharmacological treatment is approved for NAFLD. Natural health products, including bioactive peptides, are potential candidates to aid in the management of metabolic syndrome-related conditions, [...] Read more.
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, is a global health problem. Currently, no pharmacological treatment is approved for NAFLD. Natural health products, including bioactive peptides, are potential candidates to aid in the management of metabolic syndrome-related conditions, including insulin resistance and obesity. In this study, we hypothesized that an egg-white-derived bioactive peptide QAMPFRVTEQE (Peptide 2) would improve systemic and local white adipose tissue insulin sensitivity, thereby preventing high-fat diet-induced exacerbation of pathological features associated with NAFLD, such as lipid droplet size and number, inflammation, and hepatocyte hypertrophy in high-fat diet-fed mice. Similar to rosiglitazone, Peptide 2 supplementation improved systemic insulin resistance during the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and enhanced insulin signalling in white adipose tissue, modulating ex vivo lipolysis. In the liver, compared with high-fat diet fed animals, Peptide 2 supplemented animals presented decreased hepatic cholesterol accumulation (p < 0.05) and area of individual hepatic lipid droplet by around 50% (p = 0.09) and reduced hepatic inflammatory infiltration (p < 0.05) whereas rosiglitazone exacerbated steatosis. In conclusion, Peptide 2 supplementation improved insulin sensitivity and decreased hepatic steatosis, unlike the insulin-sensitizing drug rosiglitazone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Bioactive Compounds on Metabolic Syndrome)
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Review

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20 pages, 501 KiB  
Review
Potential of Chlorogenic Acid in the Management of Metabolic Dysfunction-Associated Steatotic Liver Disease (MASLD): Animal Studies and Clinical Trials—A Narrative Review
by Agnieszka Ziółkiewicz, Przemysław Niziński, Jakub Soja, Tomasz Oniszczuk, Maciej Combrzyński, Adrianna Kondracka and Anna Oniszczuk
Metabolites 2024, 14(6), 346; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo14060346 - 20 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a natural polyphenol found in coffee, tea, vegetables, and fruits. It exhibits strong antioxidant activity and possesses several other biological properties, including anti-inflammatory effects, antimicrobial activity, and insulin-sensitizing properties. Moreover, it may improve lipid and glucose metabolism. This review [...] Read more.
Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a natural polyphenol found in coffee, tea, vegetables, and fruits. It exhibits strong antioxidant activity and possesses several other biological properties, including anti-inflammatory effects, antimicrobial activity, and insulin-sensitizing properties. Moreover, it may improve lipid and glucose metabolism. This review summarizes the available information on the therapeutic effect of CGA in metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD). As the literature search engine, the browsers in the PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science databases, and ClinicalTrials.gov register were used. Animal trials and clinical studies suggest that CGA has promising therapeutic potential in treating MASLD and hepatic steatosis. Its mechanisms of action include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic effects via the activation of the Nrf2 signaling pathway and the inhibition of the TLR4/NF-κB signaling cascade. Furthermore, the alleviation of liver disease by CGA also involves other important molecules such as AMPK and important physiological processes such as the intestinal barrier and gut microbiota. Nevertheless, the specific target cell and key molecule to which CGA is directed remain unidentified and require further study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Bioactive Compounds on Metabolic Syndrome)
47 pages, 2310 KiB  
Review
Comprehensive Strategies for Metabolic Syndrome: How Nutrition, Dietary Polyphenols, Physical Activity, and Lifestyle Modifications Address Diabesity, Cardiovascular Diseases, and Neurodegenerative Conditions
by Giovanni Martemucci, Mohamad Khalil, Alessio Di Luca, Hala Abdallah and Angela Gabriella D’Alessandro
Metabolites 2024, 14(6), 327; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo14060327 - 11 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Several hallmarks of metabolic syndrome, such as dysregulation in the glucose and lipid metabolism, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, low-to-medium systemic inflammation, and intestinal microbiota dysbiosis, represent a pathological bridge between metabolic syndrome and diabesity, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative disorders. This review aims to highlight [...] Read more.
Several hallmarks of metabolic syndrome, such as dysregulation in the glucose and lipid metabolism, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, low-to-medium systemic inflammation, and intestinal microbiota dysbiosis, represent a pathological bridge between metabolic syndrome and diabesity, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative disorders. This review aims to highlight some therapeutic strategies against metabolic syndrome involving integrative approaches to improve lifestyle and daily diet. The beneficial effects of foods containing antioxidant polyphenols, intestinal microbiota control, and physical activity were also considered. We comprehensively examined a large body of published articles involving basic, animal, and human studie, as well as recent guidelines. As a result, dietary polyphenols from natural plant-based antioxidants and adherence to the Mediterranean diet, along with physical exercise, are promising complementary therapies to delay or prevent the onset of metabolic syndrome and counteract diabesity and cardiovascular diseases, as well as to protect against neurodegenerative disorders and cognitive decline. Modulation of the intestinal microbiota reduces the risks associated with MS, improves diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and exerts neuroprotective action. Despite several studies, the estimation of dietary polyphenol intake is inconclusive and requires further evidence. Lifestyle interventions involving physical activity and reduced calorie intake can improve metabolic outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Bioactive Compounds on Metabolic Syndrome)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Potential of chlorogenic acid in in the management of Metabolic Dysfunction-Associated Steatotic Liver Disease (MASLD). Animal studies and clinical trials – a non-systematic review
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