Special Issue "Dynamics and Nano-Organization in Plasma Membranes"

A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375). This special issue belongs to the section "Membranes in Life Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Eva C. Arnspang
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, University of Southern Denmark, 5230 Odense M, Denmark
Interests: plasma membrane nano-organization; diffusion of lipids and proteins; nanodomains; super-resolution microscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I will be serving as guest editor for this very interesting Special Issue on Dynamics and Nano-Organization in Plasma Membranes. The issue will collect a series of amazing papers and mini reviews about plasma membrane nano-organization, diffusion of lipids and proteins, nanodomains, super-resolution microscopy, membrane proteins, and interactions in the plasma membrane. This research field is well established, and with the invention of super-resolution microscopy, great leaps towards understanding the composition and dynamics of the plasma membrane have been achieved. I look forward to your contributions to the Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Eva C. Arnspang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Membranes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plasma membrane nano-organization
  • diffusion of lipids and proteins
  • nanodomains
  • super-resolution microscopy
  • membrane proteins and interactions in the plasma membrane

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Recent Experiments Support a Microemulsion Origin of Plasma Membrane Domains: Dependence of Domain Size on Physical Parameters
Membranes 2020, 10(8), 167; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes10080167 - 28 Jul 2020
Abstract
It is widely, but not universally, believed that the lipids of the plasma membrane are not uniformly distributed, but that “rafts” of sphingolipids and cholesterol float in a “sea” of unsaturated lipids. The physical origin of such heterogeneities is often attributed to a [...] Read more.
It is widely, but not universally, believed that the lipids of the plasma membrane are not uniformly distributed, but that “rafts” of sphingolipids and cholesterol float in a “sea” of unsaturated lipids. The physical origin of such heterogeneities is often attributed to a phase coexistence between the two different domains. We argue that this explanation is untenable for several reasons. Further, we note that the results of recent experiments are inconsistent with this picture. However, they are quite consistent with an alternate explanation, namely, that the plasma membrane is a microemulsion of the two kinds of regions. To show this, we briefly review a simplified version of this theory and its phase diagram. We also explicate the dependence of the predicted domain size on four physical parameters. They are the energy cost of gradients in the composition, the spontaneous curvature of the membrane, its bending modulus and its surface tension. Taking values of the latter two from experiment, we obtain domain sizes for several different cell types that vary from 58 to 88 nm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamics and Nano-Organization in Plasma Membranes)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Vitamin K3 Inhibiting the Function of NorA Efflux Pump and Its Gene Expression on Staphylococcus aureus
Membranes 2020, 10(6), 130; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes10060130 - 25 Jun 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Resistance to antibiotics has made diseases that previously healed easily become more difficult to treat. Staphylococcus aureus is an important cause of hospital-acquired infections and multi-drug resistant. NorA efflux pump, present in bacteria S. aureus, is synthesized by the expression of the [...] Read more.
Resistance to antibiotics has made diseases that previously healed easily become more difficult to treat. Staphylococcus aureus is an important cause of hospital-acquired infections and multi-drug resistant. NorA efflux pump, present in bacteria S. aureus, is synthesized by the expression of the norA gene. Menadione, also known as vitamin K3, is one of the synthetic forms of vitamin K. Therefore, the aim of this study is to verify the menadione effect on efflux inhibition through NorA pump gene expression inhibition and assess the effects of menadione in bacterial membrane. The effect of menadione as an efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) was evaluated by the microdilution method, fluorimetry, electron microscopy, and by RT-qPCR to evaluate gene expression. In the molecular docking, association with menadione induces increased fluorescence intensity. Menadione was observed (100% of the clusters) interacting with residues ILE12, ILE15, PHE16, ILE19, PHE47, GLN51, ALA105, and MET109 from NorA. The results showed the norA gene had its expression significantly diminished in the presence of menadione. The simulation showed that several menadione molecules were able to go through the bilayer and allow the entry of water molecules into the hydrophobic regions of the bilayer. When present within membranes, menadione may have caused membrane structural changes resulting in a decline of the signaling pathways involved in norA expression. Menadione demonstrated to be an efflux pump inhibitor with dual mechanism: affecting the efflux pump by direct interaction with protein NorA and indirectly inhibiting the norA gene expression, possibly by affecting regulators present in the membrane altered by menadione. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamics and Nano-Organization in Plasma Membranes)
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Open AccessBrief Report
Creating Supported Plasma Membrane Bilayers Using Acoustic Pressure
Membranes 2020, 10(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes10020030 - 18 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Model membrane systems are essential tools for the study of biological processes in a simplified setting to reveal the underlying physicochemical principles. As cell-derived membrane systems, giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) constitute an intermediate model between live cells and fully artificial structures. Certain [...] Read more.
Model membrane systems are essential tools for the study of biological processes in a simplified setting to reveal the underlying physicochemical principles. As cell-derived membrane systems, giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) constitute an intermediate model between live cells and fully artificial structures. Certain applications, however, require planar membrane surfaces. Here, we report a new approach for creating supported plasma membrane bilayers (SPMBs) by bursting cell-derived GPMVs using ultrasound within a microfluidic device. We show that the mobility of outer leaflet molecules is preserved in SPMBs, suggesting that they are accessible on the surface of the bilayers. Such model membrane systems are potentially useful in many applications requiring detailed characterization of plasma membrane dynamics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamics and Nano-Organization in Plasma Membranes)
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