Special Issue "Interventional Oncology"

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1010-660X). This special issue belongs to the section "Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. François Cornelis
Website
Guest Editor
Radiologie & Oncologie Interventionnelles, Sorbonne Université, Hôpital Tenon, Paris, France
Interests: interventional oncology; percutaneous ablations (cryoablation, electroporation, microwave ablation, radiofrequency ablation); osteoplasty and fixation; soft tissue; bone; spine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Interventional Oncology (IO) is a medical specialty offering innovative diagnostic and therapeutic minimally invasive procedures in the oncologic field, but also allowing to manage all issues related to cancer. One critical aspect of IO is that the concept unifying these procedures remains the imaging guidance.
IO has made considerable improvements over the last few years, driven by breakthrough innovations and technological developments. Percutaneous biopsies are widely proposed for the diagnosis of cancer but also now iteratively to confer the mandatory insights of a disease, allowing to provide the best care at the era of the personalized medicine. Furthermore, interventional oncologic treatments now include a wide array of techniques that are able to provide local control or symptom relief. They are now routinely performed in liver, kidney, lung, bone or soft-tissues. They interest a large community of physicians, including oncologists, radiation therapists, surgeons, anesthesiologists, and interventional radiologists.
The purpose of this Special Issue is to present these image-guided treatments as alternatives to conservative therapies or surgery. These techniques can serve as attractive alternatives to other options, with a clear effect on quality of life.

We remain at your disposal for additional questions.

Prof. François Cornelis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • interventional oncology
  • cancer
  • image guidance
  • biopsy
  • percutaneous ablation
  • embolization
  • local control
  • pain palliation
  • interventional radiology
  • CT-scan
  • MRI
  • PET-CT
  • ultrasound
  • cone beam computed tomography

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Hip Fracture Prevention in Osteoporotic Elderly and Cancer Patients: An On-Line French Survey Evaluating Current Needs
Medicina 2020, 56(8), 397; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina56080397 - 07 Aug 2020
Abstract
Background and objectives: Hip fracture is a major public health issue. Those fractures lead to high costs and a decrease in quality of life. A national French survey was conducted, with the objectives to firstly assess the current management of hip fracture [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: Hip fracture is a major public health issue. Those fractures lead to high costs and a decrease in quality of life. A national French survey was conducted, with the objectives to firstly assess the current management of hip fracture and its prevention, both in the osteoporotic and cancer settings, and secondly to evaluate the opinions of physicians on the potential use of minimally invasive implantable devices to prevent hip fracture in alternative of surgery. Materials and methods: This national survey was conducted in France between April and July 2017. Questionnaires were sent to orthopedic surgeons, interventional radiologists, oncologists, and rheumatologists. Completed questionnaires were analyzed and compared according to two indications: orthopedics-traumatology and oncology. Factors associated with these responses were assessed using univariable analyses, based on chi-square tests or an exact Fisher test, as appropriate. Results: A total of 182 questionnaires were completed and further analyzed. Physicians have highlighted the need for a low re-fracture rate and to improve life expectancy for more than 1 year (50% for responders of the orthopedics-traumatology questionnaire and 80% for the responders interested in both indications), as well as quality of life (12.5% and 31%, respectively), but with no significant differences in the oncologic indication. Most of the experts were willing to use or prescribe implantable devices for prevention (63% in orthopedics-traumatology and 93% in oncology), although limited clinical experience (54 and 58%) and surgical risk (around 30% in each indication) were considered as limits. Conclusions: Prevention of hip fracture remains a concern for physicians. More clinical experience with implantable devices, in particular in cancer patients, is needed, but implemented in a strategy to maximize patient recovery while reducing costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interventional Oncology)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Integrative Medicine in Interventional Oncology: A Virtuous Alliance
Medicina 2020, 56(1), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina56010035 - 17 Jan 2020
Abstract
This review aimed to identify the potential role of integrative medicine in interventional oncology. The music therapy; stress management techniques; guided imagery, including virtual reality; clinical hypnosis; and digital sedation may all be efficient on anxiety and pain during procedures performed in interventional [...] Read more.
This review aimed to identify the potential role of integrative medicine in interventional oncology. The music therapy; stress management techniques; guided imagery, including virtual reality; clinical hypnosis; and digital sedation may all be efficient on anxiety and pain during procedures performed in interventional oncology. Beyond pharmacological sedation, the implementation of integrative medicine to interventional oncology may, therefore, improve the support and care of cancer patients, which may further create a virtuous alliance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interventional Oncology)
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Open AccessReview
Prevention of Pathological Fracture of the Proximal Femur: A Systematic Review of Surgical and Percutaneous Image-Guided Techniques Used in Interventional Oncology
Medicina 2019, 55(12), 755; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55120755 - 22 Nov 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Background and objectives: Patients suffering from bone metastasis are at high risk for pathological fractures and especially hip fractures. Osteolytic metastases can induce a high morbidity rate (i.e., pain, facture risk, mobility impairment), and operation on them can be difficult in this frail [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: Patients suffering from bone metastasis are at high risk for pathological fractures and especially hip fractures. Osteolytic metastases can induce a high morbidity rate (i.e., pain, facture risk, mobility impairment), and operation on them can be difficult in this frail population having a reduced life expectancy. Several medical devices have been investigated for the prevention of these pathological hip fractures. Materials and Methods: To investigate these solutions, a literature review and a meta-analysis of primary studies was performed. Data sources included electronic databases (PubMed, CENTRAL and ClinicalTrials.gov) from 1990 until 1 January 2019. Titles, abstracts and full-text articles were reviewed in order to select only studies evaluating the performance of the studied solution to prevent osteoporotic and/or pathological hip fracture. The main outcomes were the occurrence of hip fracture, pain evaluation (VAS score) and adverse events occurrence (including severe adverse events and deaths). All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cohort studies were considered. A Bayesian cumulative meta-analysis was undertaken on the primary studies conducted in patients with bone metastasis. Results: A total of 12 primary studies were identified, all were cohort studies without a control group, and one compared two devices, and were thereafter considered separately. In those 12 samples, 255 patients were included, mean age 61.7 years. After implantation, the cumulative risk of fracture was 5.5% (95% confidence interval, 3.0% to 8.6%), and adverse event occurrence was 17.4% (95%CI, 12.6 to 22.8%), with a median follow-up of 10 months. The posterior probability of a fracture rate below 5% was 40.3%. Conclusions: The literature about medical devices evaluation for preventing hip fractures in metastatic patients is poor and mostly based on studies with a limited level of evidence. However, this systematic review shows promising results in terms of efficacy and tolerance of these devices in patients with bone metastases. This treatment strategy requires further investigations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interventional Oncology)
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