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Special Issue "Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Causes, Symptoms, Diet and Treatment"

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1010-660X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 August 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Atsushi Sakuraba

Inflammatory bowel disease center, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Inflammatory bowel disease; Crohn's disease; Ulcerative colitis; Microscopic colitis; Colon cancer; Gastrointestinal endoscopy; Fecal transplant; Clinical trials
Guest Editor
Dr. Katsuyoshi Matsuoka

Inflammatory bowel disease center, Toho University Sakura Medical Center, Chiba, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, is a chronic relapsing and remitting disorder characterized by inflammation of the digestive tract. It causes various intestinal as well as extraintestinal symptoms, which often can be debilitating. With the advancement of basic, translational, and clinical research, our understanding and management of IBD have greatly progressed over the past decades. The exact cause of IBD still remains unknown, but research has shown that genetic, immunological, and environmental factors play a role in the initiation and perpetuation of the disease process. Clinical management has greatly changed in the past decade owing to the evolution of biologic treatments, and treatment goals are now not only to control symptoms but to achieve mucosal healing and alter the natural course of the disease. To promote the basic and clinical research field in IBD, we invite investigators to contribute original research articles as well as review articles that will stimulate the continuing efforts to understand the mechanisms and management of IBD. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Genetics
  • Immunology and tolerance
  • Host-microbe interaction and fecal transplantation
  • Novel diagnostic approaches including biomarkers, serology, and imaging modalities
  • Biologic and non-biologic therapies
  • Therapeutic drug monitoring
  • Mucosal healing
  • Disease- and therapy-related complications and surveillance
  • Surgery and related issues

Dr. Atsushi Sakuraba
Dr. Katsuyoshi Matsuoka
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • inflammatory bowel disease
  • Crohn’s disease
  • ulcerative colitis
  • microbiome
  • fecal transplant
  • biologics
  • mucosal healing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Analysis of Association between Dietary Intake and Red Blood Cell Count Results in Remission Ulcerative Colitis Individuals
Received: 7 December 2018 / Revised: 30 March 2019 / Accepted: 3 April 2019 / Published: 8 April 2019
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Abstract
Background and objectives: The anemia is the most common extra-intestinal manifestation of the ulcerative colitis. Taking into account, that meat products are perceived as factor, that may promote relapses, the crucial is to indicate the dietary recommendations to prevent anemia development but without [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: The anemia is the most common extra-intestinal manifestation of the ulcerative colitis. Taking into account, that meat products are perceived as factor, that may promote relapses, the crucial is to indicate the dietary recommendations to prevent anemia development but without high animal products intake. Aim of the study was to analyze the influence of animal products intake on the red blood cell count results in remission ulcerative colitis individuals and pair-matched control group, during 6 weeks of observation. Materials and Methods: The intake of nutrients associated with anemia development (iron, vitamin B12, protein, animal protein, calcium) and the products being their sources (meat, meat products, dairy beverages, cottage cheese, rennet cheese) were analyzed. Results: In spite of the higher meat products intake in the group of ulcerative colitis individuals, the iron intake did not differ between groups. The positive correlations between intakes of meat, meat products, total protein, animal protein, iron, vitamin B12 and red blood cell count results were stated for ulcerative colitis individuals, while in control group were not observed, that may have resulted from higher susceptibility for the diet-influenced changes. Conclusions: The positive correlation between red blood cell count results and energy value of diet, and daily iron intake observed in ulcerative colitis individuals, accompanied by negative correlation for iron intake per 1000 kcal of diet, may indicate, that higher iron intake may be beneficial, but only while accompanied by high energy value of diet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Causes, Symptoms, Diet and Treatment)
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Open AccessArticle
Nonenzymatic Serum Antioxidant Capacity in IBD and Its Association with the Severity of Bowel Inflammation and Corticosteroids Treatment
Received: 8 January 2019 / Revised: 11 March 2019 / Accepted: 29 March 2019 / Published: 2 April 2019
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Abstract
Background and objectives: Oxidative stress signalling plays a monumental role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Reduction of oxidative stress might control inflammation, block tissue damage, and reverse natural history of IBD. We assessed the serum concentrations of free thiols (FT) and uric [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: Oxidative stress signalling plays a monumental role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Reduction of oxidative stress might control inflammation, block tissue damage, and reverse natural history of IBD. We assessed the serum concentrations of free thiols (FT) and uric acid (SUA), together constituting a large part of nonenzymatic serum antioxidant capacity, as well as total antioxidant status (TAS) with reference to IBD phenotype, activity, co-occurrence of anemia, and treatment with azathioprine (AZA) and corticosteroids (CS). Additionally, we appraised the potential of uric acid, thiol stress, and TAS as mucosal healing (MH) markers in ulcerative colitis. Materials and methods: SUA, FT, and TAS were measured colorimetrically using, respectively, uricase, Ellman’s and 2,2′-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) methods. Results: The study group consisted of 175 individuals: 57 controls, 71 ulcerative colitis (UC), and 47 Crohn’s disease (CD) patients. When compared to controls, SUA levels were significantly lower in patients with CD, and FT and TAS levels were significantly lower in patients with CD and UC. In UC patients, SUA, FT, and TAS inversely correlated with the severity of bowel inflammation. As MH markers, SUA displayed better overall accuracy and higher specificity than FT. In active CD, FT, and SUA were significantly lower in patients with anemia. FT was significantly lower in patients treated with corticosteroids. Conclusions: IBD patients, regardless the disease phenotype, have systemic thiol stress, depleted total antioxidant capacity, and reduced concentrations of uric acid, reflecting, to various degrees, clinical and local disease activity as well as presence of anaemia, the most common extraintestinal manifestation of IBD. Evaluation of systemic total antioxidant status may be useful in noninvasive assessment of mucosal healing. Our findings on thiol stress provide an additional aspect on adverse effects of corticosteroids therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Causes, Symptoms, Diet and Treatment)
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