Special Issue "The Properties and Applications of Nanodiamonds"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Karin Larsson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Chemistry, Uppsala University,75121, Uppsala, Sweden
Interests: diamond growth, diamond properties, theoretical simulations
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diamond has attracted a great deal of research interest since the first artificial synthesis of diamond using chemical vapor deposition, or high-pressure high-temperature methods. Its unique chemical and mechanical properties, and tunable surface structures, have been observed to improve the possibility for applications within, e.g., renewable energy, biotechnology, and electronics. As the nanotechnology synthesis methodology has developed quite fast during the past few years, nano-diamonds have been successfully synthesized. Today, nanodiamond can display an even greater interest within material science and has therefore caused extensive research interest (e.g., in the field of fluorescent nanodiamond powders for biomedical imaging). Therefore, novel developments of nanodiamonds, for various applications, will be addressed in this Special Issue. With immense pleasure, we invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Karin Larsson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nanodiamond
  • renewable energy
  • biotechnology
  • biomaterials
  • sensors
  • electronics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Effect of High Concentration and Small Size of Nanodiamonds on the Strength of Interface and Fracture Properties in Epoxy Nanocomposite
Materials 2016, 9(7), 507; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma9070507 - 23 Jun 2016
Cited by 7
Abstract
The concentration and small size of nanodiamonds (NDs) plays a crucial role in the mechanical performance of epoxy-based nanocomposites by modifying the interface strength. Herein, we systemically analyzed the relation between the high concentration and small size of ND and the fracture properties [...] Read more.
The concentration and small size of nanodiamonds (NDs) plays a crucial role in the mechanical performance of epoxy-based nanocomposites by modifying the interface strength. Herein, we systemically analyzed the relation between the high concentration and small size of ND and the fracture properties of its epoxy-based nanocomposites. It was observed that there is a two-fold increase in fracture toughness and a three-fold increase in fracture energy. Rationally, functionalized-NDs (F-NDs) showed a much better performance for the nanocomposite than pristine NDs (P-NDs) because of additional functional groups on its surface. The F-ND/epoxy nanocomposites exhibited rougher surface in contrast with the P-ND/epoxy, indicating the presence of a strong interface. We found that the interfaces in F-ND/epoxy nanocomposites at high concentrations of NDs overlap by making a web, which can efficiently hinder further crack propagation. In addition, the de-bonding in P-ND/epoxy nanocomposites occurred at the interface with the appearance of plastic voids or semi-naked particles, whereas the de-bonding for F-ND/epoxy nanocomposites happened within the epoxy molecular network instead of the interface. Because of the strong interface in F-ND/epoxy nanocomposites, at high concentrations the de-bonding within the epoxy molecular network may lead to subsequent cracks, parallel to the parent crack, via crack splitting which results in a fiber-like structure on the fracture surface. The plastic void growth, crack deflection and subsequent crack growth were correlated to higher values of fracture toughness and fracture energy in F-ND/epoxy nanocomposites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Properties and Applications of Nanodiamonds)
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Open AccessArticle
Streamlined Membrane Proteome Preparation for Shotgun Proteomics Analysis with Triton X-100 Cloud Point Extraction and Nanodiamond Solid Phase Extraction
Materials 2016, 9(5), 385; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma9050385 - 18 May 2016
Cited by 5
Abstract
While mass spectrometry (MS) plays a key role in proteomics research, characterization of membrane proteins (MP) by MS has been a challenging task because of the presence of a host of interfering chemicals in the hydrophobic protein extraction process, and the low protease [...] Read more.
While mass spectrometry (MS) plays a key role in proteomics research, characterization of membrane proteins (MP) by MS has been a challenging task because of the presence of a host of interfering chemicals in the hydrophobic protein extraction process, and the low protease digestion efficiency. We report a sample preparation protocol, two-phase separation with Triton X-100, induced by NaCl, with coomassie blue added for visualizing the detergent-rich phase, which streamlines MP preparation for SDS-PAGE analysis of intact MP and shot-gun proteomic analyses. MP solubilized in the detergent-rich milieu were then sequentially extracted and fractionated by surface-oxidized nanodiamond (ND) at three pHs. The high MP affinity of ND enabled extensive washes for removal of salts, detergents, lipids, and other impurities to ensure uncompromised ensuing purposes, notably enhanced proteolytic digestion and down-stream mass spectrometric (MS) analyses. Starting with a typical membranous cellular lysate fraction harvested with centrifugation/ultracentrifugation, MP purities of 70%, based on number (not weight) of proteins identified by MS, was achieved; the weight-based purity can be expected to be much higher. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Properties and Applications of Nanodiamonds)
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