Special Issue "Techniques for Enhanced Biocompatibility of Alloys"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Waseem Haider
Website
Guest Editor
Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, USA
Interests: biomaterials; additive manufacturing; nanomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomaterials science and technology, underlying a wide variety of biomedical devices, are essential to modern human healthcare. Generally, biomaterials do not exhibit ideal biocompatiblity properties in different applications, which limit both the range and success of the medical devices fabricated from these materials. This Special Issue addresses various enhanced biocompatibility techniques for metallic materials such as Ti alloys, stainless steel, Ta alloys, Co–Cr alloys, etc.

Assoc. Prof. Waseem Haider
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metallic implant materials
  • biocompatibility
  • cytotoxicity

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Functional Properties of Mg–Zn–X Biodegradable Magnesium Alloys
Materials 2020, 13(3), 544; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13030544 - 23 Jan 2020
Abstract
The implantation of metallic devices in orthopaedic surgical procedures and coronary angioplasty is associated with the risk of various adverse events: (i) mechanical (premature failure), (ii) chemo-mechanical (corrosion and corrosion-fatigue degradation) and (iii) biomedical (chronic local inflammatory reactions, tissue necrosis, etc.). In this [...] Read more.
The implantation of metallic devices in orthopaedic surgical procedures and coronary angioplasty is associated with the risk of various adverse events: (i) mechanical (premature failure), (ii) chemo-mechanical (corrosion and corrosion-fatigue degradation) and (iii) biomedical (chronic local inflammatory reactions, tissue necrosis, etc.). In this regard, the development of biodegradable implants/stents, which provide the necessary mechanical support for the healing period of the bone or the vessel wall and then are completely resorbed, has bright prospects. Magnesium alloys are the most suitable candidates for that purpose due to their superior mechanical performance, bioresorbability and biocompatibility. This article presents the results of the comparative research on several wrought biodegradable alloys, assessing their potential for biomedical applications. The Mg–Zn–X alloys with different chemical compositions and microstructures were produced using severe plastic deformation techniques. Functional properties pivotal for biomedical applications—mechanical strength, in vitro corrosion resistance and cytotoxic activity—were included in the focus of the study. Excellent mechanical performance and low cytotoxic effects are documented for all alloys with a notable exception for one of two Mg–Zn–Zr alloys. The in vitro corrosion resistance is, however, below expectations due to critical impurities, and this property has yet to be drastically improved through the cleaner materials fabrication processing before they can be considered for biomedical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Techniques for Enhanced Biocompatibility of Alloys)
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