Special Issue "Biosensors Based on Nanostructured Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Electronic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Beatriz Prieto-Simón
Website
Guest Editor
Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Interests: biosensors; nanotechnology; materials science; bioengineering; electrochemistry
Dr. Maria Alba
Website
Guest Editor
Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Interests: surface science; nanotechnology; nanomedicine; materials science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concept of biosensors has evolved enormously since 1962 when Clark and Lyons developed the first biosensor capable of measuring oxygen in blood which was the seed from where myriads of glucose sensors have blossomed. Although biosensors have often been conceived as powerful screening tools, advances in nanotechnology have been essential to re-shape their definition and scope, being today of high interest in many fields of application due to their unique advantages. The exponential increase in biosensors development and the flourishing success of their market are underpinned by their simplicity, potential miniaturisation and portability, even wearability, cost-effectiveness and rapid turn-around time, but also by the fact they can provide highly accurate, precise and reliable quantitative information.

Materials science has a key role in the contributions of nanotechnology to improve biosensors analytical performance and facilitate their design to fulfill the requirements of the end-user. The advanced development of new nanostructured transducers opens new insights in the design, characteristics and performance of optical, electrochemical and mass-sensitive biosensors, but also nanoelectromechanical biosystems. Apart from the signal enhancement achieved by using transducers of large surface area, nanostructured materials offer a wide range of possibilities in terms of engineering new sensing paradigms, single molecule detection, multiplexing capabilities and integration into portable devices, among others.

This Special Issue aims to cover recent advances in the development of nanostructure-based biosensors, with a special focus on highlighting the advantages of introducing structures at the nanoscale level in their design.

Dr. Beatriz Prieto-Simón
Dr. Maria Alba
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • materials science
  • biosensors
  • nanotechnology
  • bioengineering
  • surface science

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Current Trends in the Biosensors for Biological Warfare Agents Assay
Materials 2019, 12(14), 2303; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12142303 - 18 Jul 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Biosensors are analytical devices combining a physical sensor with a part of biological origin providing sensitivity and selectivity toward analyte. Biological warfare agents are infectious microorganisms or toxins with the capability to harm or kill humans. They can be produced and spread by [...] Read more.
Biosensors are analytical devices combining a physical sensor with a part of biological origin providing sensitivity and selectivity toward analyte. Biological warfare agents are infectious microorganisms or toxins with the capability to harm or kill humans. They can be produced and spread by a military or misused by a terrorist group. For example, Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, Brucella sp., Yersinia pestis, staphylococcal enterotoxin B, botulinum toxin and orthopoxviruses are typical biological warfare agents. Biosensors for biological warfare agents serve as simple but reliable analytical tools for the both field and laboratory assay. There are examples of commercially available biosensors, but research and development of new types continue and their application in praxis can be expected in the future. This review summarizes the facts and role of biosensors in the biological warfare agents’ assay, and shows current commercially available devices and trends in research of the news. Survey of actual literature is provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors Based on Nanostructured Materials)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Novel acetylcholinesterase biosensor based on gold nanoparticles obtained by electroless plating on three-dimensional graphene

Pei Dong1, Bin Jiang1,2,*, Jianbin Zheng3

1 College of Urban and Environmental Science, Northwest University, 1 Xuefu Ave., Chang’an District, Xi'an, 710127, Shaanxi Province, China

2 Shaanxi Key Laboratory of earth surface system and environmental carrying capacity, Northwest University, 1 Xuefu Ave., Chang’an District, Xi'an, 710127, Shaanxi Province, China

3 Institue of analytical science, Northwest University, 1 Xuefu Ave., Chang’an District, Xi'an, 710127, Shaanxi Province, China

In this study, a novel acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor for the detection of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) was developed based on a film of gold nanoparticles/three-dimensional graphene (AuNPs/rGO). This AuNPs/rGO film was prepared by the electroless plating of AuNPs on 3D graphene. The modified electrode displayed excellent electron-transfer mediation and electrical conductivity because of the synergistic effect of AuNPs and rGO. In addition, the AChE biosensor exhibited a good linear relationship at concentrations ranging from 1.0 × 10−6 to 1.0 × 10−10 g·L−1. Under optimum conditions, the detection limits were 2.78 × 10−11 g·L−1 and 2.17 × 10−11 g·L−1 for malathion and methyl parathion, respectively. The developed biosensor revealed satisfactory stability, excellent sensitivity, and good repeatability. These results demonstrated that the developed electrochemical sensor demonstrates promise as a sensing platform for OPs analysis.

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