Special Issue "Magnetic Properties at Extreme Conditions"

A special issue of Magnetochemistry (ISSN 2312-7481).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Mark Murrie
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Chemistry, Joseph Black Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK
Interests: coordination chemistry; molecular magnetism; single-molecule magnets; single-ion magnets; magnetic properties at extreme conditions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Extreme conditions research bridges coordination chemistry, solid state chemistry, structure, magnetism, and spectroscopy and can be used to unravel new physical behavior in superconductivity, charge transport, and magnetism. Pressure can be applied to a range of molecular magnetic materials, including single-molecule magnets, spin crossover complexes, spin chains, and magnetic frameworks. Here, applied pressure provides a direct probe for investigating magnetostructural correlations, avoiding the need to examine numerous different chemical derivatives of a given material. It is rapidly becoming a convenient tool to study molecular magnetic materials, where it has been used to increase magnetic ordering temperatures, change the orientation of Jahn–Teller axes, and control magnetic anisotropy.

This Special Issue of Magnetochemistry aims at publishing a collection of research contributions illustrating recent achievements in all aspects of the development, study, and understanding of magnetic properties at extreme conditions.

Prof. Mark Murrie
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Magnetochemistry is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • high pressure
  • magnetic properties
  • magnetostructural correlations
  • single-molecule magnets
  • spin crossover
  • spin chains
  • magnetic frameworks

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Putting the Squeeze on Molecule-Based Magnets: Exploiting Pressure to Develop Magneto-Structural Correlations in Paramagnetic Coordination Compounds
Magnetochemistry 2020, 6(3), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry6030032 - 12 Aug 2020
Viewed by 1106
Abstract
The cornerstone of molecular magnetism is a detailed understanding of the relationship between structure and magnetic behaviour, i.e., the development of magneto-structural correlations. Traditionally, the synthetic chemist approaches this challenge by making multiple compounds that share a similar magnetic core but differ in [...] Read more.
The cornerstone of molecular magnetism is a detailed understanding of the relationship between structure and magnetic behaviour, i.e., the development of magneto-structural correlations. Traditionally, the synthetic chemist approaches this challenge by making multiple compounds that share a similar magnetic core but differ in peripheral ligation. Changes in the ligand framework induce changes in the bond angles and distances around the metal ions, which are manifested in changes to magnetic susceptibility and magnetisation data. This approach requires the synthesis of a series of different ligands and assumes that the chemical/electronic nature of the ligands and their coordination to the metal, the nature and number of counter ions and how they are positioned in the crystal lattice, and the molecular and crystallographic symmetry have no effect on the measured magnetic properties. In short, the assumption is that everything outwith the magnetic core is inconsequential, which is a huge oversimplification. The ideal scenario would be to have the same complex available in multiple structural conformations, and this is something that can be achieved through the application of external hydrostatic pressure, correlating structural changes observed through high-pressure single crystal X-ray crystallography with changes observed in high-pressure magnetometry, in tandem with high-pressure inelastic neutron scattering (INS), high-pressure electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and high-pressure absorption/emission/Raman spectroscopy. In this review, which summarises our work in this area over the last 15 years, we show that the application of pressure to molecule-based magnets can (reversibly) (1) lead to changes in bond angles, distances, and Jahn–Teller orientations; (2) break and form bonds; (3) induce polymerisation/depolymerisation; (4) enforce multiple phase transitions; (5) instigate piezochromism; (6) change the magnitude and sign of pairwise exchange interactions and magnetic anisotropy, and (7) lead to significant increases in magnetic ordering temperatures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Properties at Extreme Conditions)
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