Special Issue "MOBILLE 2019"

A special issue of Languages (ISSN 2226-471X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sonia Rocca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
World Languages Department, Lycée Français de New York, NY 10021-3462, USA
Interests: child and adolescent second language acquisition, foreign language education, differentiated instruction; mobile language learning; K-12 linguistics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hosted by the iconic Lycée Français de New York, MOBILLE is a new international conference that gathers scholars and practitioners from all over the world in a forum about the impact of new technologies on learning and teaching of languages.

MOBILLE stands for Mobile Language Learning Experience. Language learning occurs in various environments, in dedicated regular classes as well as in those integrating language and subject matter. Whatever the setting, this conference will focus on how technology—ubiquitous, pervasive and forever changing, shapes the experiences of learners, as well as teachers in primary school, secondary school and beyond. What is mobile is not just the technology, but ultimately the language learning itself.

MOBILLE topics include, but are not limited to, the following areas:

  • MOBILITY IN LANGUAGE LEARNING
    • Second Language Acquisition (SLA)
    • Language for Specific Purposes (LSP)
    • Bilingualism/Multilingualism
    • Content and Language
    • Integrated Learning (CLIL)
    • Learner/Interlanguage Corpora
  • MOBILITY IN LANGUAGE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS
    • Augmented Reality
    • Blended Learning
    • Virtual Reality
    • Cloud Computing
    • Flipped Classroom
    • Virtual Classroom
    • Gamification
    • Telecollaboration
    • Learning Platforms
    • Mobile Social Media
    • Ecology of Language Learning
    • Landscapes of Language
    • Learning Digital Literacies
  • MOBILITY IN LANGUAGE TEACHING
    • Learning Designs
    • Project-Based Learning
    • Inquiry-Based Learning
    • Differentiated Instruction
    • Interactive Language Curricula
    • Special Education
    • Teacher Education
  • MOBILITY IN LANGUAGE ASSESSMENT
    • Interactive Language Assessment
    • Feedback and Evaluation
    • Learning Analytics

There will be various types of presentations to suit the various types of presenters: practice-oriented, research-oriented, and discussion-oriented. There will also be digital posters, workshops (1h 45 min), as well as virtual presentations, i.e., pre-recorded video presentations if presenters are unable to physically attend. Proposals should be submitted through the conference submission form on the website by 31 July 2018.

MOBILLE Proceedings will appear in the​ MOBILLE partner journal, Languages, an international, peer-reviewed, open access journal on interdisciplinary studies of languages, published quarterly online by MDPI.

Registered presenters are encouraged to submit full-length articles in English to the Special Issue “MOBILLE 2019” which will comprise selected papers from the conference edited by the Conference Chair, Dr. Sonia Rocca. The deadline for submissions ​to the Special Issue is 15 December 2018. Manuscripts can be submitted here. They will be peer-reviewed and published online immediately after acceptance.

Languages (ISSN 2226-471X) is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). It is indexed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and in the European Reference Index for the Humanities and Social Sciences (ERIH Plus). For further information, please contact the Editorial Office ([email protected]).

Dr. Sonia Rocca
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Languages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Second Language Acquisition (SLA)
  • Language for Specific Purposes (LSP)
  • Bilingualism/Multilingualism
  • Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL)
  • Learner/Interlanguage Corpora
  • Augmented Reality
  • Blended Learning
  • Virtual Reality
  • Cloud Computing
  • Flipped Classroom
  • Virtual Classroom
  • Gamification
  • Telecollaboration
  • Learning Platforms
  • Mobile Social Media
  • Ecology of Language Learning
  • Landscapes of Language Learning
  • Digital Literacies
  • Learning Designs
  • Project-Based Learning
  • Inquiry-Based Learning
  • Differentiated Instruction
  • Interactive Language Curricula
  • Special Education
  • Teacher Education
  • Interactive Language Assessment
  • Feedback and Evaluation
  • Learning Analytics

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication
Coptic Language Learning and Social Media
Languages 2019, 4(3), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages4030073 - 11 Sep 2019
Abstract
This study explored the potential of using the Internet, including existing social media platforms, for Coptic language learning. Through global exposure, endangered language maintenance and revitalization efforts may benefit from having a presence on social media. The researcher created Coptic language learning material, [...] Read more.
This study explored the potential of using the Internet, including existing social media platforms, for Coptic language learning. Through global exposure, endangered language maintenance and revitalization efforts may benefit from having a presence on social media. The researcher created Coptic language learning material, social media accounts on multiple platforms, and a website. Data were collected through a survey with questions focused on social media users’ background and experience with the Coptic language learning material. In addition to the survey, analytics from the social media and website platforms were documented. The results indicated that social media provided a global audience and the Coptic language learning material blended into survey respondents’ daily lives with positive acceptance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MOBILLE 2019)
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Open AccessCommunication
Virtual Reality in the Teaching of FLE in a Brazilian Public School
Languages 2019, 4(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages4020036 - 09 Jun 2019
Abstract
Considering the emergence of digital information and communication technologies in the contemporary educational context, this work aims to explore the possibilities offered by Virtual Reality (VR) headsets in the school environment, and also to verify how they can contribute to foreign language teaching [...] Read more.
Considering the emergence of digital information and communication technologies in the contemporary educational context, this work aims to explore the possibilities offered by Virtual Reality (VR) headsets in the school environment, and also to verify how they can contribute to foreign language teaching and learning. The motivation of this work is a result of a pedagogical practice experience carried out by the researcher during French classes in a Brazilian foreign language teaching project in public schools. This pedagogical practice later became the subject of their master’s research, which is currently being conducted in the same educational context in two French language classes. The main objective consists of verifying to what extent VR can contribute to foreign language teaching/learning, focusing on the four linguistic competences and motivation. The methodology of this work has a qualitative nature with some quantitative results, and is characterized as Action Research, as the researcher participated in the activities. These activities consisted of using Google Cardboard, a VR headset, to present interactive 360° videos and tours of real places. The preliminary results show that activities with VR can promote a high level of motivation and engagement, also contributing to the development of the four linguistic competences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MOBILLE 2019)
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Open AccessCommunication
Maintaining Quality Online: Piloting an Online Language Course for Immigrants in Finland
Languages 2019, 4(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages4020025 - 22 Apr 2019
Abstract
Finland’s educational system has aroused the interest of educational researchers worldwide. Teaching and learning with information and communication technologies (ICT) is one of the major methodologies in the present Finnish educational discourse. Feedback and assessment are questions of course design in online learning. [...] Read more.
Finland’s educational system has aroused the interest of educational researchers worldwide. Teaching and learning with information and communication technologies (ICT) is one of the major methodologies in the present Finnish educational discourse. Feedback and assessment are questions of course design in online learning. This paper discusses and illustrates how to plan an online course for a higher education preparatory program in Finland by using digital methods with a focus on maintaining quality in the processes of feedback and evaluation. This paper also introduces and reflects recently published quality criteria that are recommended to be used in the design of online courses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MOBILLE 2019)
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Open AccessArticle
Expert–Novice Negotiation within Learning Opportunities in Online Intercultural Interactions
Languages 2019, 4(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages4010014 - 21 Feb 2019
Abstract
Computer-mediated communication (CMC) and e-communication tools have introduced new pedagogical tools and activities that contribute to the development of language learners’ academic, multilingual, and intercultural skills and competences. Moreover, CMC has reinforced communication and collaboration between individuals and educational institutions through projects of [...] Read more.
Computer-mediated communication (CMC) and e-communication tools have introduced new pedagogical tools and activities that contribute to the development of language learners’ academic, multilingual, and intercultural skills and competences. Moreover, CMC has reinforced communication and collaboration between individuals and educational institutions through projects of intercultural language exchanges (ILE). Most of these exchanges idealise ‘nativeness’, and assert the L1 speaker as an expert ‘by default’. These models of ILE believe that the incorporation of a L1S is key to the creation of learning opportunities. This paper contests this belief. The one-to-one online video conversations took place on Skype between language learners of English and/or French over a period of four months. The dyads comprise the following speakers’ constellations: a L1S of French with a L1S of English, and a L1S of English with an Algerian (L2/LF of French and English). To assure equity in the use of languages, I scheduled two sessions every week, one in English and the second in French. This paper investigates the expert/novice dichotomy and how it is negotiated in the learning opportunities they have created. It also casts light on the speakers’ communicative strategies and linguaculture(s) included in overcoming intercultural misunderstanding and miscommunication when using or not using their L1, French and/or English. These intercultural interactions have uncovered that the novice–expert roles alternate between the speakers despite the language of communication and their L1s. The interactants used several strategies and channels, namely pragmatic strategies such as repetition, nonverbal cues to ask for clarification and signal intercultural misunderstandings, translanguaging and their multilingual repertoires in order to construct meaning, achieve their communicative goals or in case of the lack of linguistic resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MOBILLE 2019)
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Open AccessArticle
Adolescent ELLs Improve Their Academic English while Learning about the UN Online
Languages 2019, 4(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages4010009 - 13 Feb 2019
Abstract
This action research project aimed at evaluating and revising Actionthroughwords (ATW), an online course on language learning through content for high school English language learners. Our multifaceted purpose is to help English language learners in an English language arts class to enhance their [...] Read more.
This action research project aimed at evaluating and revising Actionthroughwords (ATW), an online course on language learning through content for high school English language learners. Our multifaceted purpose is to help English language learners in an English language arts class to enhance their academic English language and literacy, while learning online about the work of the UN for health and peace worldwide. A teacher and nineteen students in a public high school bilingual program acted as learner-consultants, with a shift of learners’ roles to one of authority and engagement. Using a mixed design, data came from questionnaires, classroom observation, and interviews with the teacher and eight of her students. All participants responded affirmatively to the ATW site and expressed appreciation not only for the content but also for focused activities to enhance vocabulary development and grammatical awareness. Results showed students’ view of the UN was somewhat positive to begin with and became more positive over time. Participants recommended revision of ATW to make content more accessible through scaffolding and first language support and to offer additional games and videos appropriate for teenagers’ interests and modes of learning. Differentiated instructional materials and strategies integrated with the school curriculum were also suggested for future implementation of the course. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MOBILLE 2019)
Open AccessArticle
Developing Professional Communication: The Construction of a Multimodal Understanding of Job Interviews
Languages 2019, 4(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages4010005 - 17 Jan 2019
Abstract
This article explores how online videos with a pedagogical focus can possibly make an impact on our current language teaching and learning practices. The affordance of videos to create multimodal content that can be shared with the public allows content creators to use [...] Read more.
This article explores how online videos with a pedagogical focus can possibly make an impact on our current language teaching and learning practices. The affordance of videos to create multimodal content that can be shared with the public allows content creators to use a wide range of resources, such as spoken and written language, gestures, screen layout, etc., to create learning environments that can promote an awareness of a multimodal perspective to the understanding of a particular kind of professional communication context, such as job interviews, as illustrated in this article. By analyzing a series of videos on job interviews using multimodal semiotic analysis, I argue that these videos, which I call pedagogical vlogs, are helpful not only in terms of teaching the language skills required for job interviews, but also to help create a multimodal understanding of job interviews through the strategic orchestration of multiple semiotic modes. The popularity of pedagogical vlogs, as well as their affordance to provide lesson content created by the public, offer new possibilities for language teaching and learning, but it has yet only received scant attention from applied linguistics and language education researchers. This article aims to start a dialog on the pedagogical implications of this new form of learning so as to uncover the potentials offered by pedagogical vlogs in education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MOBILLE 2019)

Other

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Open AccessEssay
Ethics-Based Computer Science in Bilingual and Multicultural Schools
Languages 2019, 4(4), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages4040087 - 05 Nov 2019
Abstract
For decades, schools have adapted to a technologically-dependent world—developing courses, faculty positions and curricula to begin explicitly teaching with and about technology. Recognizing the need for deepening education in this area, the Lycée Français de New York, a bilingual and multicultural school, developed [...] Read more.
For decades, schools have adapted to a technologically-dependent world—developing courses, faculty positions and curricula to begin explicitly teaching with and about technology. Recognizing the need for deepening education in this area, the Lycée Français de New York, a bilingual and multicultural school, developed the digital learning department to lead the school’s thinking and practice around technology and computer science education. Over time, the department shifted its focus from first only the use of computer applications, to an emphasis on computer programming, to a more recent era which includes technology ethics as an equally important area of study. In serving a bilingual school, the Lycée’s digital learning team adapted teaching methods for a bilingual student body. The multiculturalism of the school presents the opportunity for fertile ethics discussions, since cultural values often impact values regarding technology use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MOBILLE 2019)
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Open AccessEssay
Ecocomposition in the ESL Classroom: The Campus Space Compare and Contrast Assignment
Languages 2019, 4(2), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages4020028 - 22 May 2019
Abstract
This essay showcases a place-based compare–contrast assignment originally designed for first-year ESL composition courses at a U.S. university. This ecocomposition assignment prompts students to research and compare the technological design and visual rhetoric embodied in two spaces or buildings in their learning community. [...] Read more.
This essay showcases a place-based compare–contrast assignment originally designed for first-year ESL composition courses at a U.S. university. This ecocomposition assignment prompts students to research and compare the technological design and visual rhetoric embodied in two spaces or buildings in their learning community. Based on my experience using this assignment for three consecutive semesters in 2017–2018, this essay discusses the grounding of the campus space compare–contrast assignment in theories of content-based instruction and place-based ecocomposition, and argues for its suitability in intermediate and advanced language learning contexts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MOBILLE 2019)
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