Special Issue "Rural Landscapes - Challenges and Solutions to Landscape Governance"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 April 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Jørgen Primdahl
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geoscience and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Interests: rural landscape; landscape management
Prof. Teresa Pinto-Correia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
ICAAM, University of Évora, Portugal
Interests: rural landscapes; society and environment; landscape ecology; Mediterranean land-use systems; landscape management and governance
Prof. Veerle Van Eetvelde
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
Interests: landscape ecology; landscape and heritage management and planning; patterns and processes of landscape change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rural landscape dynamics are challenging existing policy regimes for a number of reasons, and new approaches to landscape governance regimes are called for. The underlying driving forces for landscape change—market developments, technological innovations, and urbanization in various forms, including counter-urbanization and tourism—are increasingly interlinked and globalized. Policy regimes are functioning at multiple levels across a number of sectors. Some domains have been de-regulated, such as agricultural policies; others have expanded, such as nature conservation and natural resource policies; and others, again, have been decentralized, such as land-use planning—all adding to the complexity of change and regulation. Finally, rural communities themselves have changed because of various combinations of in and out migrations, and often find themselves locked in between the increasing influence from outside forces and internal social and cultural segregation. Power relations have changed, although these changes are not always acknowledged by those involved.

In this Special Issue, we address these challenges for rural landscape governance. Based on literature reviews and empirical studies, we tackle the following questions: How are the key actors in present day landscapes coping with the change processes and the resulting governance challenges? How are these key actors interplaying with each other? What general governance challenges can be identified and what characterizes these challenges? Which approaches have been shown to point forward and how can they be brought together in the specific contexts forming the conditions for the individual rural landscape?

Prof. Jørgen Primdahl
Prof. Teresa Pinto-Correia
Prof. Dr. Veerle Van Eetvelde
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • rural landscape management
  • governance
  • public policies
  • rural communities and actors
  • landscape and societal change

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Reflections on How State–Civil Society Collaborations Play out in the Context of Land Grabbing in Argentina
Land 2019, 8(8), 116; https://doi.org/10.3390/land8080116 - 30 Jul 2019
Abstract
We examine collaborations between the state and civil society in the context of land grabbing in Argentina. Land grabbing provokes many governance challenges, which generate new social arrangements. The incentives for, limitations to, and contradictions inherent in these collaborations are examined. We particularly [...] Read more.
We examine collaborations between the state and civil society in the context of land grabbing in Argentina. Land grabbing provokes many governance challenges, which generate new social arrangements. The incentives for, limitations to, and contradictions inherent in these collaborations are examined. We particularly explore how the collaborations between the provincial government of Santiago del Estero and non-government organizations (NGOs) played out. This province has experienced many land grabs, especially for agriculture and livestock production. In response to protest and political pressure, two provincial agencies were established to assist communities in relation to land tenure issues (at different stages). Even though many scholars consider state–civil society collaborations to be introduced by nation states only to gain and maintain political power, we show how rural communities are actually supported by these initiatives. By empowering rural populations, active NGOs can make a difference to how the negative implications of land grabbing are addressed. However, NGOs and government agencies are constrained by global forces, local political power plays, and stakeholder struggles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rural Landscapes - Challenges and Solutions to Landscape Governance)
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