Future Trends in Clinical and Basic Studies on Aspergillus spp.

A special issue of Journal of Fungi (ISSN 2309-608X). This special issue belongs to the section "Fungal Pathogenesis and Disease Control".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 1986

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology FORTH, School of Medicine, University of Crete Heraklion, 71003 Crete, Greece
Interests: aspergillus; cell wall; glycobiology; diagnosis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to collect high-quality review papers from any field focused on Aspergillus. We encourage researchers from related fields to contribute review papers that highlight the latest developments in their fields or to invite relevant experts and colleagues to do so. Full-length comprehensive reviews are preferred.

Prof. Dr. Jean-Paul Latgé
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Fungi is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

19 pages, 2876 KiB  
Article
A Timeline of Biosynthetic Gene Cluster Discovery in Aspergillus fumigatus: From Characterization to Future Perspectives
by Hye-Won Seo, Natalia S. Wassano, Mira Syahfriena Amir Rawa, Grant R. Nickles, André Damasio and Nancy P. Keller
J. Fungi 2024, 10(4), 266; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof10040266 - 02 Apr 2024
Viewed by 815
Abstract
In 1999, the first biosynthetic gene cluster (BGC), synthesizing the virulence factor DHN melanin, was characterized in Aspergillus fumigatus. Since then, 19 additional BGCs have been linked to specific secondary metabolites (SMs) in this species. Here, we provide a comprehensive timeline of [...] Read more.
In 1999, the first biosynthetic gene cluster (BGC), synthesizing the virulence factor DHN melanin, was characterized in Aspergillus fumigatus. Since then, 19 additional BGCs have been linked to specific secondary metabolites (SMs) in this species. Here, we provide a comprehensive timeline of A. fumigatus BGC discovery and find that initial advances centered around the commonly expressed SMs where chemical structure informed rationale identification of the producing BGC (e.g., gliotoxin, fumigaclavine, fumitremorgin, pseurotin A, helvolic acid, fumiquinazoline). Further advances followed the transcriptional profiling of a ΔlaeA mutant, which aided in the identification of endocrocin, fumagillin, hexadehydroastechrome, trypacidin, and fumisoquin BGCs. These SMs and their precursors are the commonly produced metabolites in most A. fumigatus studies. Characterization of other BGC/SM pairs required additional efforts, such as induction treatments, including co-culture with bacteria (fumicycline/neosartoricin, fumigermin) or growth under copper starvation (fumivaline, fumicicolin). Finally, four BGC/SM pairs were discovered via overexpression technologies, including the use of heterologous hosts (fumicycline/neosartoricin, fumihopaside, sphingofungin, and sartorypyrone). Initial analysis of the two most studied A. fumigatus isolates, Af293 and A1160, suggested that both harbored ca. 34–36 BGCs. However, an examination of 264 available genomes of A. fumigatus shows up to 20 additional BGCs, with some strains showing considerable variations in BGC number and composition. These new BGCs present a new frontier in the future of secondary metabolism characterization in this important species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Trends in Clinical and Basic Studies on Aspergillus spp.)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

12 pages, 2472 KiB  
Review
New Vision of Cell Walls in Aspergillus fumigatus from Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy
by Isha Gautam, Kalpana Singh, Malitha C. Dickwella Widanage, Jayasubba Reddy Yarava and Tuo Wang
J. Fungi 2024, 10(3), 219; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof10030219 - 16 Mar 2024
Viewed by 790
Abstract
The fungal cell wall plays a critical role in regulating cellular integrity and communication, and serves as a frontline defense against stress. It is also a prime target for the development of antifungal agents. The cell wall is comprised of diverse polysaccharides and [...] Read more.
The fungal cell wall plays a critical role in regulating cellular integrity and communication, and serves as a frontline defense against stress. It is also a prime target for the development of antifungal agents. The cell wall is comprised of diverse polysaccharides and proteins and poses a challenging target for high-resolution structural characterization. Recently, the solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) analysis of intact Aspergillus fumigatus cells has provided atomic-level insights into the structural polymorphism and functional assembly principles of carbohydrate components within the cell wall. This physical perspective, alongside structural information from biochemical assays, offers a renewed understanding of the cell wall as a highly complex and dynamic organelle. Here, we summarize key conceptual advancements in the structural elucidation of A. fumigatus mycelial and conidial cell walls and their responses to stressors. We also highlight underexplored areas and discuss the opportunities facilitated by technical advancements in ssNMR spectroscopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Trends in Clinical and Basic Studies on Aspergillus spp.)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop