Special Issue "Application of Remote Sensing Methods to Monitor Coastal Zones"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Luis Pedro Almeida
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Rio Grande, Brasil
Interests: coastal processes; remote sensing
Dr. Rafael Almar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Research for Development, LEGOS, Toulouse, France
Interests: multi-scale coastal processes; optical-image processing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Regional sea-level change, winds, waves, currents, extreme events, sediment supply, land-use change, and urbanization are all forcing agents that can change coastal zones. How coastal environments respond to natural and anthropogenic factors depends on the characteristics of the forcing agents, as well as on the characteristics of the coastal systems that remain poorly known and mostly unsurveyed. To better understand changes affecting coastal zones and to provide useful information to decision-makers, it is crucial to collect and analyze various types of observations covering local to global scales, and both short- and long-term time scales. In this context, remote-sensing methods, ranging from shore-based, aerial, or space platforms, including active and passive sensors, offer unique skills to overcome this challenge. In this Special Issue “Application of Remote Sensing Methods to Monitor Coastal Zones”, we invite authors to submit new innovative research that focuses on the application of remote-sensing methodologies (preferably new ones) to monitor coastal zones, including forcing agents (e.g., sea level, waves, wind, currents, etc.) and environmental responses (e.g. topographic and bathymetric response, land cover, etc.), from short to long-term time scales. New software tools or applications (e.g., Google Earth Engine, QGIS, etc.) that involve the use of remote-sensing datasets to monitor coastal processes are also encouraged for submission to this Special Issue.

Dr. Luis Pedro Almeida
Dr. Rafael Almar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Remote sensing
  • Sediment transport
  • Coastal topography
  • Shallow-water bathymetry
  • Shallow-water hydrodynamics
  • Land-cover change
  • Google Earth Engine
  • Satellite altimetry
  • Satellite multispectral imagery
  • LiDAR
  • Video-monitoring

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Validating UAS-Based Photogrammetry with Traditional Topographic Methods for Surveying Dune Ecosystems in the Spanish Mediterranean Coast
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(9), 297; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7090297 - 30 Aug 2019
Abstract
In the past few years, unmanned aerial systems (UAS) have achieved great popularity for civil uses. One of the present main uses of these devices is low-cost aerial photogrammetry, being especially useful in coastal environments. In this work, a high-resolution 3D model of [...] Read more.
In the past few years, unmanned aerial systems (UAS) have achieved great popularity for civil uses. One of the present main uses of these devices is low-cost aerial photogrammetry, being especially useful in coastal environments. In this work, a high-resolution 3D model of a beach section in Guardamar del Segura (Spain) has been produced by employing a low maximum takeoff mass (MTOM) UAS, in combination with the use of structure-from-motion (SfM) techniques. An unprecedented extensive global navigation satellite system (GNSS) survey was simultaneously carried out to statistically validate the model by employing 1238 control points for that purpose. The results show good accuracy, obtaining a vertical root mean square error (RMSE) mean value of 0.121 m and a high point density, close to 30 pt/m2, with similar or even higher quality than most coastal surveys performed with classical techniques. UAS technology permits the acquisition of topographic data with low time-consuming surveys at a high temporal frequency. Coastal managers can implement this methodology into their workflow to study the evolution of complex, highly anthropized dune-beach systems such as the one presented in this study, obtaining more accurate surveys at lower costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Remote Sensing Methods to Monitor Coastal Zones)
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Open AccessArticle
Video Sensing of Nearshore Bathymetry Evolution with Error Estimate
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(7), 233; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7070233 - 19 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Although coastal morphology results essentially from underwater sediment transports, the evolution of underwater beach profiles along the diverse coastlines of the world is still poorly documented. Bathymetry inversion from shore-based video cameras set forth a more systematic evaluation and is becoming more commonly [...] Read more.
Although coastal morphology results essentially from underwater sediment transports, the evolution of underwater beach profiles along the diverse coastlines of the world is still poorly documented. Bathymetry inversion from shore-based video cameras set forth a more systematic evaluation and is becoming more commonly used. However, there are limitations to this profiling method that are insufficiently assessed, undermining confidence in operational applications. In this paper, we investigate the daily evolution of a low tide terrace (LTT) in Nha Trang beach, Vietnam, under strong seasonal forcing: from weak wind waves during summer monsoon to moderate waves during winter monsoon. A new error estimation for depth inversion is presented based on tidal evaluation. The method compares video-based estimate and direct measurement of tidal amplitudes to provide a quality criterion. It reveals three types of errors, the main one being a deep water error associated with physical limits—loss of celerity-bathymetry relationship in deep water. This error is dependent on wave period and thus has a strong seasonal pattern in Vietnam. It is generally detrimental to depth inversion where wind waves are dominant (in summer here). On the contrary, the second error type is larger for larger waves and is located at breakpoint, altering wave detection. The last error type is due to nonlinear effects and wave setup in shallow water. After removing the faulty data, we finally present the first reliable three-year time-series of a beach profile in Nha Trang, Vietnam. A main result is the overall stability demonstrated for the LTT beach, with rapid exchange of sediment between the terrace and the upper beach during typhoons, monsoon events or seasonal cycles. These tropical environments may provide faster beach recovery compared with mid-latitude configurations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Remote Sensing Methods to Monitor Coastal Zones)
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Open AccessArticle
Nearshore Wave Transformation Domains from Video Imagery
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(6), 186; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7060186 - 17 Jun 2019
Abstract
Within the nearshore area, three wave transformation domains can be distinguished based on the wave properties: shoaling, surf, and swash zones. The identification of these distinct areas is relevant for understanding nearshore wave propagation properties and physical processes, as these zones can be [...] Read more.
Within the nearshore area, three wave transformation domains can be distinguished based on the wave properties: shoaling, surf, and swash zones. The identification of these distinct areas is relevant for understanding nearshore wave propagation properties and physical processes, as these zones can be related, for instance, to different types of sediment transport. This work presents a technique to automatically retrieve the nearshore wave transformation domains from images taken by coastal video monitoring stations. The technique exploits the pixel intensity variation of image acquisitions, and relates the pixel properties to the distinct wave characteristics. This allows the automated description of spatial and temporal extent of shoaling, surf, and swash zones. The methodology was proven to be robust, and capable of spotting the three distinct zones within the nearshore, both cross-shore and along-shore dimensions. The method can support a wide range of coastal studies, such as nearshore hydrodynamics and sediment transport. It can also allow a faster and improved application of existing video-based techniques for wave breaking height and depth-inversion, among others. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Remote Sensing Methods to Monitor Coastal Zones)
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Open AccessArticle
Seagrass Resource Assessment Using WorldView-2 Imagery in the Redfish Bay, Texas
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(4), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7040098 - 10 Apr 2019
Abstract
Seagrass meadows play important roles as habitats for many marine organisms, traps for sediment, and buffers against wave actions. The objective of this paper is to map seagrass meadows in the Redfish Bay, Texas from WorldView-2 imagery. Seagrass meadows grow in shallow and [...] Read more.
Seagrass meadows play important roles as habitats for many marine organisms, traps for sediment, and buffers against wave actions. The objective of this paper is to map seagrass meadows in the Redfish Bay, Texas from WorldView-2 imagery. Seagrass meadows grow in shallow and clear water areas in the Redfish Bay. The WorldView-2 satellite can acquire multispectral imagery from the bay bottom with 2 m spatial resolution 8 multispectral bands and 0.46 m panchromatic imagery. The top of atmosphere radiance was transformed to the bottom reflectance through the atmospheric correction and the water column correction. The object based image analysis was used to identify seagrass meadows distributions in the Redfish Bay. This investigation demonstrated that seagrass can be identified with 94% accuracy, although seagrass species cannot be satisfactorily recognized. The results implied that the WorldView-2 satellite imagery is a suitable data source for seagrass distribution mapping. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Remote Sensing Methods to Monitor Coastal Zones)
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Open AccessArticle
Low-Cost UAV for High-Resolution and Large-Scale Coastal Dune Change Monitoring Using Photogrammetry
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(3), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7030063 - 07 Mar 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
In this paper, coastal dune data are collected at Truc Vert, SW France, using photogrammetry via Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). A low-cost GoPro-equipped DJI Phantom 2 quadcopter and a 20 MPix camera-equipped DJI Phantom 4 Pro quadcopter UAVs were used to remotely sense [...] Read more.
In this paper, coastal dune data are collected at Truc Vert, SW France, using photogrammetry via Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). A low-cost GoPro-equipped DJI Phantom 2 quadcopter and a 20 MPix camera-equipped DJI Phantom 4 Pro quadcopter UAVs were used to remotely sense the coastal dune morphology over large spatial scales (4 km alongshore, i.e., approximately 1 km2 of beach-dune system), within a short time (less than 2 h of flight). The primary objective of this paper is to propose a low-cost and replicable approach which, combined with simple and efficient permanent Ground Control Point (GCP) set-up, can be applied to routinely survey upper beach and coastal dune morphological changes at high frequency (after each storm) and high resolution (0.1 m). Results show that a high-resolution and accurate Digital Surface Model (DSM) can be inferred with both UAVs if enough permanent GCPs are implemented. The more recent DJI Phantom 4 gives substantially more accurate DSM with a root-mean-square vertical error and bias of 0.05 m and −0.03 m, respectively, while the DSM inferred from the DJI Phantom 2 still largely meets the standard for coastal monitoring. The automatic flight plan procedure allows replicable surveys to address large-scale morphological evolution at high temporal resolution (e.g., weeks, months), providing unprecedented insight into the coastal dune evolution driven by marine and aeolian processes. The detailed morphological evolution of a 4-km section of beach-dune system is analyzed over a 6-month winter period, showing highly alongshore variable beach and incipient foredune wave-driven erosion, together with wind-driven inland migration of the established foredune by a few meters, and alongshore-variable sand deposition on the grey dune. In a context of widespread erosion, this photogrammetry approach via low-cost flexible and lightweight UAVs is well adapted for coastal research groups and coastal dune management stakeholders, including in developing countries where data are lacking. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Remote Sensing Methods to Monitor Coastal Zones)
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Open AccessArticle
Continuous Coastal Monitoring with an Automated Terrestrial Lidar Scanner
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(2), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7020037 - 07 Feb 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This paper details the collection, geo-referencing, and data processing algorithms for a fully-automated, permanently deployed terrestrial lidar system for coastal monitoring. The lidar is fixed on a 4-m structure located on a shore-backing dune in Duck, North Carolina. Each hour, the lidar collects [...] Read more.
This paper details the collection, geo-referencing, and data processing algorithms for a fully-automated, permanently deployed terrestrial lidar system for coastal monitoring. The lidar is fixed on a 4-m structure located on a shore-backing dune in Duck, North Carolina. Each hour, the lidar collects a three-dimensional framescan of the nearshore region along with a 30-min two-dimensional linescan time series oriented directly offshore, with a linescan repetition rate of approximately 7 Hz. The data are geo-referenced each hour using a rigorous co-registration process that fits 11 fixed planes to a baseline scan to account for small platform movements, and the residual errors from the fit are used to assess the accuracy of the rectification. This process decreased the mean error (defined as the magnitude of the offset in three planes) over a two-year period by 24.41 cm relative to using a fixed rectification matrix. The automated data processing algorithm then filters and grids the data to generate a dry-beach digital elevation model (DEM) from the framescan along with hourly wave runup, hydrodynamic, and morphologic statistics from the linescan time series. The lidar has collected data semi-continuously since January 2015 (with gaps occurring while the lidar was malfunctioning or being serviced), resulting in an hourly data set spanning four years as of January 2019. Examples of data products and potential applications spanning a range of spatial and temporal scales relevant to coastal processes are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Remote Sensing Methods to Monitor Coastal Zones)
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