Modelling and Optimisation of Ship’s Fuel Consumption for Realistic Operational Conditions

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021) | Viewed by 9362

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Athens, Greece
Interests: ship design; ship hydrodynamics; intact and damage stability; numerical and optimization methods; maritime regulations; risk assessment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Interests: green shipping; marine hydrodynamics; ship dynamics; resistance and powering; ship design and optimization; nonlinear wave–body interaction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The reduction of a ship’s fuel consumption is a fundamental issue in ship design and operation, as it is a prime contributor to the ship’s operational costs and greatly affects the ship’s environmental footprint. With the introduction of new regulations by the IMO on GHG emissions, such as EEDI, EEXI, EEOI, SEEMP, and CII, and the uncertainties of the fuel market, the shipping and shipbuilding industry is facing many challenges now and in the years to come. The modelling and optimisation of a ship’s fuel consumption for realistic operational conditions is a complex issue, encompassing ship hydrodynamics, ship design and operation, ship energy management, data collection/management, and operations research.

In this Special Issue, we invite high-value submissions dealing with original research outcomes within the following research topics and emerging subjects:

  • Holistic modelling of a ship’s resistance and propulsion system for realistic operational conditions;
  • The optimisation of a ship’s routing;
  • Speed–power performance in low and high sea states;
  • The effect of fouling on the hull and propeller;
  • Ship design for future operational demands;
  • Fleet maintenance (predictive, condition-based, or others);
  • The analysis and management of fuel data;
  • Sensor/monitoring technology;
  • Business models to deal with the volatile operational environment.

Prof. Dr. Habil. Apostolos Papanikolaou
Dr. Shukui Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Holistic modelling of the resistance and propulsion system
  • Fuel and speed-power performance analysis
  • Hull and propeller fouling
  • Data-driven predictive maintenances
  • EEDI, EEOI, EEXI, SEEMP, and MRV
  • Ship design optimisation
  • Condition-based maintenance
  • Monitoring technology
  • Business models

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 2891 KiB  
Article
Supporting Predictive Maintenance of a Ship by Analysis of Onboard Measurements
by Shukui Liu, Haoliang Chen, Baoguo Shang and Apostolos Papanikolaou
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(2), 215; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10020215 - 6 Feb 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3327
Abstract
Ship hull and propeller fouling has a severe impact both on fuel costs and on greenhouse gas emission, thus, it is an important subject to consider when developing a maintenance plan to enhance energy efficiency and reduce gas emissions from ships. This paper [...] Read more.
Ship hull and propeller fouling has a severe impact both on fuel costs and on greenhouse gas emission, thus, it is an important subject to consider when developing a maintenance plan to enhance energy efficiency and reduce gas emissions from ships. This paper presents a two-step approach for evaluating the actual propulsive performance of a ship through analyzing continuous onboard measurement. First, the onboard monitored data are corrected for the wind and wave effects using fast and transparent empirical methods. Second, the corrected data are filtered based on hydrodynamic criteria. A case study is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the methodology. Subsequently, the processed data are analyzed by mathematical tools to derive an engine power–rpm curve to represent the actual propulsive performance of the ship. By comparing the derived curve against the nominal curve for engine design, it is possible to identify the deterioration of the ship’s condition, which is the key task in developing the identification capability that is needed in a proactive maintenance procedure. This methodology is expected to support the maritime sector in combating climate change by reducing the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions from ship operations. Full article
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20 pages, 3698 KiB  
Article
A Power Demand Analytical Model of Self-Propelled Vessels
by Javier Zamora
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(12), 1450; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9121450 - 18 Dec 2021
Viewed by 2564
Abstract
The article herein presents a closed-form mathematical equation by which it is possible to estimate the propulsion power demand of ships as a function of the propeller parameters and total Resistance. The validation of the derived model is conducted by use of the [...] Read more.
The article herein presents a closed-form mathematical equation by which it is possible to estimate the propulsion power demand of ships as a function of the propeller parameters and total Resistance. The validation of the derived model is conducted by use of the Series 60 Model data and of the Korea Research Institute of Ships and Ocean Engineering (KRISO) Very Large Crude-oil Carrier 2 (KVLCC2) data. In all the cases tested, the derived model explained more than 99.9% of the data variability. Furthermore, the paper describes a practical method for quantifying changes in hull and propeller performance and provides an application example. Full article
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19 pages, 14406 KiB  
Article
Development of Enhanced Two-Time-Scale Model for Simulation of Ship Maneuvering in Ocean Waves
by Jaehak Lee, Bo Woo Nam, Jae-Hoon Lee and Yonghwan Kim
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(7), 700; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9070700 - 25 Jun 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2312
Abstract
In this study, a modified two-time-scale model is proposed to overcome the limitations of the existing maneuvering analysis model. To this end, not only wave conditions but also all directions of ship operation velocities are considered in estimating wave drift force and moment. [...] Read more.
In this study, a modified two-time-scale model is proposed to overcome the limitations of the existing maneuvering analysis model. To this end, not only wave conditions but also all directions of ship operation velocities are considered in estimating wave drift force and moment. Subsequently, the increment of the drift force and moment induced by steady drift and yaw motion of a ship is imposed up to the first derivative of Taylor series expansion. By introducing this bilinear model, the burden of the drift force computation is reduced so that a more realistic and efficient seakeeping-maneuvering coupling analysis can be performed. A turning circle simulation in a regular short wave is carried out using the modified two-time-scale model. Then, the performance is validated by comparing its results with the direct coupling model. Moreover, quantitative improvement of the present numerical scheme and the influence of the operation velocities on ship maneuvering performance are discussed. Full article
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