Special Issue "Dynamic Response of Marine Structures under Wave Action"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Alessandro Antonini
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands
Interests: wave-structure interaction; coastal and offshore structures; extreme events analysis; probabilistic design; CFD; physical modelling; wave mechanics; structural dynamics; wave energy
Dr. Bas Hofland
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Delft University of Technology, 2628CN Delft, The Netherlands
Interests: coastal structures like breakwaters (e.g. rubble mound, caissons, and floating); revetments; flood barriers; bed protections
Dr. Pedro Lomonaco
Website
Guest Editor
O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory, Oregon State University, School of Civil and Construction Engineering, 3550 SW Jefferson Way, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
Interests: physical and numerical modelling of wave generation and propagation; wave-structure interaction; stability of coastal and submarine structures; behaviour of floating structures; hydrodynamics; non-linear behaviour of long-waves in shallow waters

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The earth is experiencing climate change and as a result it is likely that the frequency and intensity of extreme waves will increase. This requires the design of new reliable and economically viable marine structures, as well as the assessment of the existing ones. Marine structures, in the broadest sense (i.e. coastal, offshore and renewable marine energy), are mainly designed to withstand wave action. However, common design approaches are based on a static assumption that might lead to a misleading estimation of the design stresses, especially when considering rigid (concrete, steel, or masonry) structures. It is, indeed, of great importance to properly assess the dynamic response of these structures exposed to the breaking and non-breaking wave action. Based on the findings of two recent ongoing research projects, the UK based STORMLAMP and the Dutch DynaHicS, as well as the ongoing research activities on the hydro-RTHS (hydrodynamic real-time simulation) carried out in the framework of the US NHERI Program (Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure), we identified the importance of disseminating the most update scientific knowledge about this topic that fuses two fascinating engineering sectors, hydraulics and structural engineering.

In accordance, this Special Issue aims to disseminate research articles, review articles and case studies on topics including:

  • Dynamic response of marine structures under wave loadings;
  • Dynamic characterization of marine structures;
  • Characterization of dynamic loads on rigid structures;
  • Characterization of the impulsive wave loadings;
  • Hydro-elastic numerical and physical modelling of marine structures;
  • Best practice on dynamic based structural health monitoring of marine structures.
  • Recent development in the aereo/hydro RTHS techniques for deformable floating structures modelling

Dr. Alessandro Antonini
Dr. Bas Hofland
Dr. Pedro Lomonaco
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Coastal structures
  • Offshore structures
  • Structural dynamics
  • Hydro-elastic numerical modelling
  • Hydro-elastic physical modelling
  • Aereo/hydro RTHS modelling
  • Marine structure monitoring
  • Wave loadings

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
SPH-FE-Based Numerical Simulation on Dynamic Characteristics of Structure under Water Waves
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(9), 630; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8090630 - 20 Aug 2020
Abstract
Offshore structures are prone to produce a dynamic response under the effect of large wave load. In this paper, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics coupled with finite element (SPH-FE) method is used to investigate the dynamic characteristics of structure induced by the water waves. [...] Read more.
Offshore structures are prone to produce a dynamic response under the effect of large wave load. In this paper, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics coupled with finite element (SPH-FE) method is used to investigate the dynamic characteristics of structure induced by the water waves. The dam break model is assumed to generate water wave. Firstly, the parameter of particle spacing included in the SPH method is examined and the appropriate value is proposed. Subsequently, the present numerical model is validated by comparing with the available results from the literature. Furthermore, the influence of several parameters on the wave load of the structure and the induced dynamic characteristics is studied, including the water column height, the distance between the water column and structure, and the structure stiffness. The results show that the amplification of the wave load on the bottom of structure is greater than that on the upper part of the structure. The increase of structure stiffness results in a decrease in the displacement at the top of structure, but an increase in the hydrodynamic force at the bottom of structure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamic Response of Marine Structures under Wave Action)
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Open AccessArticle
Image-Based Measurement of Wave Interactions with Rubble Mound Breakwaters
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(6), 472; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8060472 - 26 Jun 2020
Abstract
Over the past decade, the use of imaging devices to perform quantitative measurements has seen wide-scale adoption and has become integral to the emerging fields of research, such as computer vision and artificial intelligence. Recent studies, published across a wide variety of fields, [...] Read more.
Over the past decade, the use of imaging devices to perform quantitative measurements has seen wide-scale adoption and has become integral to the emerging fields of research, such as computer vision and artificial intelligence. Recent studies, published across a wide variety of fields, have demonstrated a vast number of ways through which image-based measurement systems can be used in their respective fields. A growing number of studies have demonstrated applications in coastal and ocean research. Edge detection methods have been used to measure water surface and bedform elevation from recorded video taken during wave flume experiments. The turbulent mixing of air and water, induced by the breaking waves and the runup processes, poses a particular problem for the edge-detection methods, since they rely on a sharp contrast between air and water. In this paper, an alternative method for tracking water surface, based on color segmentation, is presented. A set of experiments were conducted whereby the proposed method was used to detect water surface profiles for various types of breaking waves interacting with a rubble mound breakwater. The results were further processed to compute the surface velocity during runup. The time-history of surface velocity is shown to closely parallel the point measurements taken nearby the instrumented armor unit. These velocities can potentially serve as boundary conditions for determining the dynamic loads exerted on the armour units. Further, the image processing results are used to remove the time-varying buoyant force from the measured force acting on an individual armour unit, providing additional insight into how the forces develop over time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamic Response of Marine Structures under Wave Action)
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