Special Issue "Numerical Assessments of Tidal Stream and Wave Energy in Coastal Shelf Seas"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Coastal Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (12 April 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nicolas Guillou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Cerema (Centre d’études et d’expertise sur les risques, l’environnement, la mobilité et l’aménagement), DtecREM, Hydraulique et Aménagement, 155 rue Pierre Bouguer, Technopôle Brest-Iroise, BP 5, 29280 Plouzané, France
Interests: physical oceanography; wave energy; coastal dynamics; numerical modelling; in situ observations; data mining
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. George Lavidas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Maritime, Mechanical & Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
Interests: climate change; marine renewable energy; numerical wave modelling; wave propagation; energy economics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Georges Chapalain
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratoire de Génie Côtier et Environnement (LGCE), Direction Eau Mer et Fleuves, Département Environnement et Risques, Cerema, 155 rue Pierre Bouguer Technopôle Brest-Iroise, BP 5, 29280 Plouzané, France
Interests: physical oceanography; coastal dynamics; estuaries; sediment dynamics; in-situ observations

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The exploitation of marine renewable energies has attracted the interest of governments committed to reducing carbon dioxide emissions. Particular attention has thus been dedicated to tidal stream energy, which is predictable by nature, and the wave resource, which is particularly abundant in coastal shelf seas. However, prior to the commercial-scale deployment of energy converters, refined resource assessments are required to optimize the design and location of devices while improving the economic reliability of the project. As extensive in situ observations cannot encompass the available resources at regional scale, resource assessments most often rely on numerical modelling tools. This Special Issue aims at reviewing the most recent research studies and future challenges in numerical assessments of tidal stream and wave energy, addressing model calibration, resource variability, or the environmental effects of energy extraction over a wide range of spatio-temporal timescales (from turbulence to decade and from single device to shelf sea).

Dr. Nicolas Guillou
Dr. George Lavidas
Dr. Georges Chapalain
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wave and tidal stream energy
  • resource assessments
  • wave and current interactions
  • wave climate
  • resource variability
  • numerical modelling
  • energy extraction
  • array layout
  • continental shelf seas

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Two-Dimensional Modelling of a Quayside Floating System
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(11), 903; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8110903 - 11 Nov 2020
Viewed by 418
Abstract
This paper studies the behaviour of a quayside floater oscillating in front of a vertical dike. In order to study the floater motion and the impact of the dike on the floater, a linear analytical model based on 2D potential flow theory [...] Read more.
This paper studies the behaviour of a quayside floater oscillating in front of a vertical dike. In order to study the floater motion and the impact of the dike on the floater, a linear analytical model based on 2D potential flow theory in intermediate water depth conditions and a numerical model resolving 2D Navier–Stokes equations are developed. Physical tests performed for different floater dimensions in a wave tank are used as references for the analytical and numerical models. The comparison of the results obtained analytically, numerically and experimentally leads to the validity domain of the potential model. A correction of this model is proposed, based on the optimization of the radiated coefficients, and a quadratic drag term is added according to Morison equation. The impact of the different parameters of the system on floater behaviour is considered. Results show that the draft has the most important impact on floater motion. Full article
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Article
The Potential for Tidal Range Energy Systems to Provide Continuous Power: A UK Case Study
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(10), 780; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8100780 - 06 Oct 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1241
Abstract
The extraction of tidal energy from head differences represents a predictable and flexible option for generating electricity. Here, we investigate the generation potential of prospective tidal power plants in the UK. Originally conceived as separate projects, operating these schemes as a cooperative system [...] Read more.
The extraction of tidal energy from head differences represents a predictable and flexible option for generating electricity. Here, we investigate the generation potential of prospective tidal power plants in the UK. Originally conceived as separate projects, operating these schemes as a cooperative system could prove beneficial. Combined with the inherent operational flexibility of tidal range-based schemes, a notable tidal phase difference in selected sites allows for the system to spread power generation over a larger proportion of the day. Using depth-averaged modelling and gradient-based optimisation techniques, we explore how a flexible cumulative operation schedule could be applied to provide a degree of continuous supply if desirable. While fully continuous operation is not achieved, a number of different optimisation schedules deliver cumulative continuous supply for over half of the year. The average minimum cumulative power output on these days is consistently over 500 MW out of a total installed capacity of 6195.3 MW. Furthermore, by introducing financial incentives associated with reliable, baseload supply, we provide an economic assessment of the tidal power plant system. The daily minimum cumulative power output determines income in the modelled idealised baseload market, while excess supply is traded in an hourly variable wholesale energy market. Results indicate that subsidies would be required in order to make a pursuit of continuous generation financially advantageous over energy maximisation strategies. Full article
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Article
The Influence of the Chamber Configuration on the Hydrodynamic Efficiency of Oscillating Water Column Devices
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(10), 751; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8100751 - 26 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 767
Abstract
Based on the two-dimensional linear wave theory, the effects of the front wall thickness and the bottom profile of an Oscillating Water Column (OWC) device on its efficiency were analyzed. Using the potential flow approach, the solution of the associated boundary value problem [...] Read more.
Based on the two-dimensional linear wave theory, the effects of the front wall thickness and the bottom profile of an Oscillating Water Column (OWC) device on its efficiency were analyzed. Using the potential flow approach, the solution of the associated boundary value problem was obtained via the boundary element method (BEM). Numerical results for several physical parameters and configurations were obtained. The effects of the front wall thickness on the efficiency are discussed in detail, then, various configurations of the chamber bottom are presented. A wider efficiency band was obtained with a thinner front wall. In a real scenario having a thinner front wall means that such a structure could have less capacity to withstand the impact of storm waves. Applying the model for the case of the Mutriku Wave Energy Plant (MWEP), findings showed that the proposed bottom profiles alter the efficiency curve slightly; higher periods of the incoming water waves were found. This could increase the efficiency of the device in the long-wave regime. Finally, the numerical results were compared with those available in the literature, and were found to be in good agreement. Full article
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Review

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Review
Numerical Assessment of Onshore Wave Energy in France: Wave Energy, Conversion and Cost
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(11), 947; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8110947 - 20 Nov 2020
Viewed by 683
Abstract
There are few general analyses of the interest of onshore wave energy converters (onshore WEC) in terms of resources, efficiency and cost. The case of The Channel on the Atlantic coast of France is chosen here to illustrate the issues related to onshore [...] Read more.
There are few general analyses of the interest of onshore wave energy converters (onshore WEC) in terms of resources, efficiency and cost. The case of The Channel on the Atlantic coast of France is chosen here to illustrate the issues related to onshore WEC development. The paper presents a list of potential sites with their characteristics and a more in-depth analysis of a few sites. For four onshore WEC families, the production is given with a method of calculating the efficiency and economic analysis is carried out to estimate the energy cost at two selected sites. Annual wave power levels are maximum in Bayonne with 24 kW/m, and the lengths of useful dikes vary from 60 m in Molène up to 4000 m in Cherbourg. Wave reflection on the dike is an advantage in terms of energy production. The oscillating flaps constitute the systems with the highest efficiency, and the float systems have the lowest levelized cost of energy (LCoE), followed closely by the oscillating flaps. Oscillating water columns and overtopping systems have nearly five times these LCoEs. With mass production, costs of oscillating floats and flaps will approach those of other renewable energies such as solar and wind power. Full article
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Review
Wave Energy Resource Assessment for Exploitation—A Review
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(9), 705; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8090705 - 11 Sep 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1284
Abstract
Over recent decades, the exploitation of wave energy resources has sparked a wide range of technologies dedicated to capturing the available power with maximum efficiency, reduced costs, and minimum environmental impacts. These different objectives are fundamental to guarantee the development of the marine [...] Read more.
Over recent decades, the exploitation of wave energy resources has sparked a wide range of technologies dedicated to capturing the available power with maximum efficiency, reduced costs, and minimum environmental impacts. These different objectives are fundamental to guarantee the development of the marine wave energy sector, but require also refined assessments of available resource and expected generated power to optimize devices designs and locations. We reviewed here the most recent resource characterizations starting from (i) investigations based on available observations (in situ and satellite) and hindcast databases to (ii) refined numerical simulations specifically dedicated to wave power assessments. After an overall description of formulations and energy metrics adopted in resource characterization, we exhibited the benefits, limitations and potential of the different methods discussing results obtained in the most energetic locations around the world. Particular attention was dedicated to uncertainties in the assessment of the available and expected powers associated with wave–climate temporal variability, physical processes (such as wave–current interactions), model implementation and energy extraction. This up-to-date review provided original methods complementing the standard technical specifications liable to feed advanced wave energy resource assessment. Full article
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