Special Issue "Antibacterial Biomaterials"

A special issue of Journal of Functional Biomaterials (ISSN 2079-4983). This special issue belongs to the section "Antibacterial Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2022 | Viewed by 1029

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Laurent Pieuchot
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse, Université de Haute-Alsace, 68057 Mulhouse, France
Interests: biomaterials; antimicrobial agents; functional zeolites; surface functionalization; mechanobiology; cell migration; tissue morphogenesis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microbial infections on biomaterials or implanted devices can lead to severe postoperative complications, and are therefore a prominent concern in the healthcare industry. For example, biofilm formation can strongly compromise the wound-healing process, device integration, and lead to the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Recent advances have been made to implement antimicrobial properties in the design of biomaterials in order to overcome these infection-related complications. Various techniques have been developed to modify the surface chemistry or topography, or to associate antimicrobial components such as metallic ions, natural extracts, or peptides that can be released over time and confer long-term antimicrobial properties. The goal of this Special Issue is to compile recent advances in antimicrobial biomaterial design and give a focused overview on new and trending research in the field.

Dr. Laurent Pieuchot
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Biomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobial agents
  • silver ion
  • metal-exchanged zeolite
  • polymer engineering
  • polymer synthesis
  • surface functionalization
  • antimicrobial peptide
  • antimicrobial agents immobilization
  • bactericidal additives
  • antimicrobial agents diffusion
  • new drug delivery systems
  • microbiocidal
  • infection control

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Cu2+ Release from Polylactic Acid Coating on Titanium Reduces Bone Implant-Related Infection
J. Funct. Biomater. 2022, 13(2), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb13020078 - 10 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Implant-related infection (IRI) is a major problem in orthopedics. Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element with strong bactericidal activity and, thus, presents potential for reducing IRI. The present study explored a straightforward strategy for releasing Cu2+ from titanium (Ti) implants, and [...] Read more.
Implant-related infection (IRI) is a major problem in orthopedics. Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element with strong bactericidal activity and, thus, presents potential for reducing IRI. The present study explored a straightforward strategy for releasing Cu2+ from titanium (Ti) implants, and we conducted a preliminary study to assess the feasibility of this approach in clinical translation. Polylactic acid (PLA) coatings containing different concentrations of copper ions were prepared on Ti discs. The antibacterial activity and biocompatibility of the copper ion-incorporated Ti implants were evaluated using Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and animal models. In vitro, the coatings produced burst release of Cu2+ in 12 h, and inhibited S. aureus growth in a dose-dependent manner. The coatings prepared from PLA solutions containing 0.5 or 1.0 mg/mL reduced the viability and osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs, but these effects were negated after the coatings were immersed in culture medium for 6 h. Four weeks after implantation, the Cu-free K-wires challenged with S. aureus had persistent infection and inferior fracture healing to the other three groups, while Cu-coated wires had no evidence of infection. Furthermore, the Cu-coated wires placed in rabbits without S. aureus challenge showed superior fracture healing to the other three groups. These results suggest that PLA coatings containing Cu2+ may be an effective design for reducing IRI without adversely affecting adjacent bone healing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial Biomaterials)
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Article
Rational Design and Characterisation of Novel Mono- and Bimetallic Antibacterial Linde Type A Zeolite Materials
J. Funct. Biomater. 2022, 13(2), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb13020073 - 02 Jun 2022
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Abstract
The development of antimicrobial devices and surfaces requires the setup of suitable materials, able to store and release active principles. In this context, zeolites, which are microporous aluminosilicate minerals, hold great promise, since they are able to serve as a reservoir for metal-ions [...] Read more.
The development of antimicrobial devices and surfaces requires the setup of suitable materials, able to store and release active principles. In this context, zeolites, which are microporous aluminosilicate minerals, hold great promise, since they are able to serve as a reservoir for metal-ions with antimicrobial properties. Here, we report on the preparation of Linde Type A zeolites, partially exchanged with combinations of metal-ions (Ag+, Cu2+, Zn2+) at different loadings (0.1–11.9 wt.%). We combine X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction to monitor the metal-ion contents, distribution, and conservation of the zeolite structure after exchange. Then, we evaluate their antimicrobial activity, using agar dilution and optical-density monitoring of Escherichia coli cultures. The results indicate that silver-loaded materials are at least 70-fold more active than the copper-, zinc-, and non-exchanged ones. Moreover, zeolites loaded with lower Ag+ concentrations remain active down to 0.1 wt.%, and their activities are directly proportional to the total Ag content. Sequential exchanges with two metal ions (Ag+ and either Cu2+, Zn2+) display synergetic or antagonist effects, depending on the quantity of the second metal. Altogether, this work shows that, by combining analytical and quantitative methods, it is possible to fine-tune the composition of bi-metal-exchanged zeolites, in order to maximise their antimicrobial potential, opening new ways for the development of next-generation composite zeolite-containing antimicrobial materials, with potential applications for the design of dental or bone implants, as well as biomedical devices and pharmaceutical products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibacterial Biomaterials)
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