Special Issue "Bark and Wood Boring Insects - Past, Present and the Future Knowledge We Need"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450). This special issue belongs to the section "Insect Ecology, Diversity and Conservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Dimitrios N. Avtzis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Forest Research Institute, Hellenic Agricultural Organization Demeter, 57006 Vassilika, Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: Conservation Biology PCR Biodiversity Climate Change Molecular Biology Ecology and Evolution Evolution Ecology Electrophoresis Species Diversity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ferenc Lakatos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Silviculture and Forest Protection, Faculty of Forestry, University of Sopron, Bajcsy-Zsilinszky u. 4, H–9400 Sopron, Hungary
Interests: bark and ambrosia beetles; biogeography; invasive/non-native species; pest monitoring and management; climate change and insects; population dynamics.

Special Issue Information

Bark and wood-boring beetles have long been considered one of the major regulating factors of forest ecosystems, with their impact covering multiple functions therein. However, their fingerprint has become more pronounced in the last few decades as population outbreaks become more frequent, long-lasting, and intense, resulting in tremendous ecological and economic damage all over the globe. In addition, the unintentional human-mediated translocation of these species to new regions has further exaggerated their detrimental impact. The aim of this Special Issue is to present a collection of state-of-the-art studies on bark and wood-boring beetles worldwide, focusing not only on their population dynamics and invasion pathways, but also on their management. In this context, we welcome manuscripts that deal with the population genetics and dynamics of bark and wood-boring beetles, the surveying of the pathways that invasive species have employed when expanding beyond their natural range, as well as the exploration of the most efficient approaches that can be applied to control their populations and mitigate the consequences of their outbreaks.

Dr. Dimitrios N. Avtzis
Prof. Dr. Ferenc Lakatos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bark beetles
  • wood-boring beetles
  • pest management.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Bark and Wood Boring Insects—Past, Present, and the Future Knowledge We Need
Insects 2021, 12(1), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12010028 - 04 Jan 2021
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Abstract
Bark and wood-boring insects represent a very diverse group of insects that includes bark and ambrosia beetles, cerambycids, weevils, jewel beetles, or even anobiids from the order of beetles (Coleoptera), but in the broader sense other insect orders like Lepidoptera (e [...] Full article

Research

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Article
Olean (1,7-dioxaspiro[5.5]undecane): A Novel Intraspecific Chemical Cue in Coraebus undatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)
Insects 2021, 12(12), 1085; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12121085 (registering DOI) - 03 Dec 2021
Viewed by 265
Abstract
The main aim of this work was to identify semiochemicals from the jewel beetle Coraebus undatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) that may aid in the improvement of current monitoring tools. First, HS-SPME collections revealed that individually sampled adults (>7 days old) of both sexes [...] Read more.
The main aim of this work was to identify semiochemicals from the jewel beetle Coraebus undatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) that may aid in the improvement of current monitoring tools. First, HS-SPME collections revealed that individually sampled adults (>7 days old) of both sexes release the spiroacetal 1,7-dioxaspiro[5.5]undecane (olean). Electroantennographic recordings from both sexes exposed to increasing amounts of olean followed a dose-dependent pattern, with females being more responsive than males to the highest amount of the compound (100 µg). In double-choice assays, adults older than seven days were significantly attracted to olean, whereas this attraction was not detected in insects aged less than seven days. Indeed, a repellent effect was observed in young females. Subsequent field trials employing sticky purple prism traps revealed that there were no differences among the number of insects caught in control and olean-baited traps at two different release rates (0.75 and 3.75 mg/day). Interestingly, all the trapped specimens were determined as mated females, regardless of the presence of olean. Overall, these findings provide a basis for unraveling the chemical ecology of the species, although further research is still needed to determine the specific role of this compound within the chemical communication of the species. Full article
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Article
Successful Eradication of the Asian Longhorn Beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, from North-Eastern Italy: Protocol, Techniques and Results
Insects 2021, 12(10), 877; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12100877 - 28 Sep 2021
Viewed by 343
Abstract
The Asian Longhorn Beetle (ALB), Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), is an important and extremely polyphagous wood-boring beetle native to Asia. In the 1990s, ALB was accidentally introduced into North America and Europe. In 2009, a large ALB infestation was found in the Veneto [...] Read more.
The Asian Longhorn Beetle (ALB), Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), is an important and extremely polyphagous wood-boring beetle native to Asia. In the 1990s, ALB was accidentally introduced into North America and Europe. In 2009, a large ALB infestation was found in the Veneto Region (north-eastern Italy), in the municipality of Cornuda (Treviso province). Eradication actions were immediately undertaken, based on delimitation of infested and buffer zones, tree visual inspections, felling and chipping of infested trees, trapping protocols, and citizen alerts. A total of 36,361 trees, belonging to 16 genera, were surveyed twice a year over an area of 7594 hectares. In 2020, after 11 years of eradication measures, the ALB population of Cornuda was declared eradicated. Overall, 2361 trees belonging to 8 genera were felled and destroyed, of which 1157 were found to be infested by ALB. This paper describes all the actions carried out and the procedures applied in order to eradicate ALB from north-eastern Italy, providing a useful example for current and future ALB eradication programs. Full article
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Review

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Review
The Bark Beetle Phloeotribus rhododactylus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Has a Stable Range in Europe
Insects 2020, 11(12), 856; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11120856 - 02 Dec 2020
Viewed by 802
Abstract
The bark beetle Phloeotribus rhododactylus feeds mainly on the shrub Cytisus scoparius. The range of P. rhododactylus extends from Spain in the south to southern Sweden, Denmark, and Scotland in the north. Its range to the east extends to Poland, Slovakia, and Hungary, [...] Read more.
The bark beetle Phloeotribus rhododactylus feeds mainly on the shrub Cytisus scoparius. The range of P. rhododactylus extends from Spain in the south to southern Sweden, Denmark, and Scotland in the north. Its range to the east extends to Poland, Slovakia, and Hungary, but single localities are known further east in Romania, Bulgaria, and Greece. It is clear that the range of the beetle matches that of its main host. C. scoparius is adapted to Mediterranean and coastal climates, and its range is limited by low winter temperatures. P. rhododactylus is, therefore, rare in Central Europe. It infests either individuals of C. scoparius that have been damaged by mammalian herbivores or snow or that are drought-stressed. Although C. scoparius is an invasive plant in agricultural and natural ecosystems, P. rhododactylus has not been found in any of the areas where C. scoparius has invaded. Full article
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