Special Issue "Insecticide Resistance: The Genetic Basis and Underlying Mechanisms in Potato Pests"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450). This special issue belongs to the section "Insect Physiology, Reproduction and Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ian Scott
Website
Guest Editor
London Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON N5V 4T3, Canada
Interests: Insecticide Resistance; Biopesticides
Prof. Zsofia Szendrei
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
Interests: vegetable entomology; insect genomics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Insecticide resistance is a growing problem worldwide, with numerous pests rapidly developing resistance. Potato pests, such as the Colorado potato beetle and potato/peach aphid, are some of the prime examples of insects overcoming the effects of insecticides and their mode of actions. In order to delay the development of resistance, growers are advised to alternate insecticide use according to their different classes. This is becoming more challenging with an ever-decreasing number of insecticide classes and products. As a result, the use of reduced risk products—both synthetic pesticides and biopesticides—and the development of novel biotechnology (RNAi) is increasing. Therefore, the evolution of resistance to these products in potato insect pests should also be addressed. Research presented in this Special Issue should examine changes in the susceptibility to these technologies in both laboratory and field populations as well as mechanisms of resistance. Understanding the genetic basis of resistance will provide critical information for the resistance management of these new products.

Dr. Ian Scott
Prof. Zsofia Szendrei
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Potato
  • insect pests
  • insecticide resistance
  • genetic mechanisms

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication
Low Mismatch Rate between Double-Stranded RNA and Target mRNA Does Not Affect RNA Interference Efficiency in Colorado Potato Beetle
Insects 2020, 11(7), 449; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11070449 - 16 Jul 2020
Abstract
RNA interference (RNAi)-based technology has been proven as a novel approach for insect pest control. However, whether insects could evolve resistance to RNAi and the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. The target gene mutations were thought to be one of the potential ways [...] Read more.
RNA interference (RNAi)-based technology has been proven as a novel approach for insect pest control. However, whether insects could evolve resistance to RNAi and the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. The target gene mutations were thought to be one of the potential ways to develop the resistance. Here we predicted the effective siRNA candidates that could be derived from dsRNA against the Colorado potato beetle (CPB) β-Actin gene (dsACT). By site-directed mutagenesis, we synthesized the dsRNAs with the defect in generation of effective siRNAs (and thus were supposed to have comparable low RNAi efficacy). We showed that, with mismatches to the target gene, all the dsRNA variants caused similar levels of silencing of target gene, mortality and larval growth retardation of CPB. Our results suggest that when the mismatch rate of dsACT and target β-Actin mRNA is less than 3%, the RNAi efficiency is not impaired in CPB, which might imply the low possibility of RNAi resistance evolving through the sequence mismatches between dsRNA and the target gene. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The ABCB Multidrug Resistance Proteins Do Not Contribute to Ivermectin Detoxification in the Colorado Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say)
Insects 2020, 11(2), 135; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11020135 - 20 Feb 2020
Abstract
The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), is a significant agricultural pest that has developed resistance to many insecticides that are used to control it. Investigating the mechanisms of insecticide detoxification in this pest is important for ensuring its continued control, since they [...] Read more.
The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), is a significant agricultural pest that has developed resistance to many insecticides that are used to control it. Investigating the mechanisms of insecticide detoxification in this pest is important for ensuring its continued control, since they may be contributors to such resistance. Multidrug resistance (MDR) genes that code for the ABCB transmembrane efflux transporters are one potential source of insecticide detoxification activity that have not been thoroughly examined in L. decemlineata. In this study, we annotated the ABCB genes found in the L. decemlineata genome and then characterized the expression profiles across midgut, nerve, and Malpighian tubule tissues of the three full transporters identified. To investigate if these genes are involved in defense against the macrocyclic lactone insecticide ivermectin in this insect, each gene was silenced using RNA interference or MDR protein activity was inhibited using a chemical inhibitor, verapamil, before challenging the insects with a dose of ivermectin. Survival of the insects did not significantly change due to gene silencing or protein inhibition, suggesting that MDR transporters do not significantly contribute to defense against ivermectin in L. decemlineata. Full article
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